473,695 Members | 2,565 Online
Bytes | Software Development & Data Engineering Community
+ Post

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Problem with CSS Horizontal Dropdown Menu

Jim

Hi,

I have two questions/problems pertaining to CSS horizontal dropdown
menus and am hoping that someone here can help me out.

(1)

I'm having a problem centering the menu. I picked up the code for
this from a tutorial but that menu was flush-left justified. Not what
I want. Subsequent searches on google on how to center yielded a
varity of ways to center things but none have worked.

The only way I've been able to center the menu inside the enclosing
table is to set the margin-left property on the menu id to force the
menu to the right. It works but I don't like it because it is "hard
coded" centering. Any ideas on how to center the menu itself so that
it recenters itself automatically no matter what size table it's in?
Also, when I started out my text was left justified but in the course
of throwing in multitudes of centering options, the menu text is now
centered as well. Ideally I'd like the text to be left justified.

The test page I am working on can be found here:
URL=<http://www.nss.org/testmenu/news.htm>

(2)

If you take a look at the picture at
URL=<http://www.nss.org/testmenu/Firefox.jpgyou will see that in
Firefox the top level buttons are even and that the drop down
component appears immediately below its parent.

If you look at URL=<http://www.nss.org/testmenu/IE7.jpg>, you will see
that in Internet Explorer 7 the dropdown is shifted to the right and
that the last top level button on the right doesn't fill in properly.

Is there a way to get the menu to behave the same in both Firefox and
IE? Note that I don't have access to either IE5 or 6 so have no idea
how the code fairs there.

Thanks in advance for your help.


Best Regards, Jim
http://artsnova.com/blog
Jun 27 '08 #1
19 3680
On 2008-04-29, Jim <Fa*********@as trodigitalNOT.o rgwrote:
>
Hi,

I have two questions/problems pertaining to CSS horizontal dropdown
menus and am hoping that someone here can help me out.

(1)

I'm having a problem centering the menu. I picked up the code for
this from a tutorial but that menu was flush-left justified. Not what
I want. Subsequent searches on google on how to center yielded a
varity of ways to center things but none have worked.

The only way I've been able to center the menu inside the enclosing
table is to set the margin-left property on the menu id to force the
menu to the right. It works but I don't like it because it is "hard
coded" centering. Any ideas on how to center the menu itself so that
it recenters itself automatically no matter what size table it's in?
The problem here is you want centered shrink-to-fit. For that you want
display: table, but it won't work in IE.

See
http://netweaver.com.au/alt/shrinkTo...rinkToFit.html

It's no good setting width: 100% on that div (#menu)-- you want it wide
enough for the floats in it, not to set its content area to 100% the
width of its container.

Alternatively, since you're setting exact widths on most things, you can
work out the width #menu needs to be, set it to that width, and then
give it auto left and right margins. But that's not much better than
just setting the left margin to 15px.

Or leave it as width auto, make it text-align: center, and make the
items inside it display: inline or display: inline-block. This is a
bigger change though and may cause you more problems. Display:
inline-block is not supported in FF2.

So those are the options.

My recommendation: use display: table for decent browsers and just let
it align to the left in IE. It's not going to hurt anyone to have it on
the left.
Also, when I started out my text was left justified but in the course
of throwing in multitudes of centering options, the menu text is now
centered as well. Ideally I'd like the text to be left justified.

The test page I am working on can be found here:
URL=<http://www.nss.org/testmenu/news.htm>
Remove text-align: center from #menu and #menu ul and remove
align="center" from the table containing #menu.

I also saw float: center in your stylesheet. There's no such thing!

On the subject of centering, why not just go for an altogether less
centered design? It looks a bit outdated these days to centre
everything, probably because it's so much harder to do practically in
non-tables CSS so everyone gives up.
(2)

If you take a look at the picture at
URL=<http://www.nss.org/testmenu/Firefox.jpgyou will see that in
Firefox the top level buttons are even and that the drop down
component appears immediately below its parent.

If you look at URL=<http://www.nss.org/testmenu/IE7.jpg>, you will see
that in Internet Explorer 7 the dropdown is shifted to the right and
that the last top level button on the right doesn't fill in properly.

Is there a way to get the menu to behave the same in both Firefox and
IE? Note that I don't have access to either IE5 or 6 so have no idea
how the code fairs there.
I don't have (or want) access to any version of IE so can't help you
with this one. But bear in mind also that your menus are not accessible
to people who don't have a mouse or pointing device.

That's no way to build a thriving extraterrestria l community.
Jun 27 '08 #2
Jim
Hi Ben,

On Tue, 29 Apr 2008 16:27:28 -0500, Ben C <sp******@spam. eggswrote:
>On 2008-04-29, Jim <Fa*********@as trodigitalNOT.o rgwrote:
>>
(1)

I'm having a problem centering the menu. I picked up the code for
this from a tutorial but that menu was flush-left justified. Not what
I want. Subsequent searches on google on how to center yielded a
varity of ways to center things but none have worked.

The only way I've been able to center the menu inside the enclosing
table is to set the margin-left property on the menu id to force the
menu to the right. It works but I don't like it because it is "hard
coded" centering. Any ideas on how to center the menu itself so that
it recenters itself automatically no matter what size table it's in?

The problem here is you want centered shrink-to-fit. For that you want
display: table, but it won't work in IE.

Great. Most of the traffic to the site is from folks using IE. So
whatever I do it has to work in IE back to v5. For my personal sites,
I don't care if it doesn't work in IE - I just make sure my code
passes the W3c validation.

>
See
http://netweaver.com.au/alt/shrinkTo...rinkToFit.html

It's no good setting width: 100% on that div (#menu)-- you want it wide
enough for the floats in it, not to set its content area to 100% the
width of its container.

Okay. I dropped that code. No change so no harm.

>
Alternativel y, since you're setting exact widths on most things, you can
work out the width #menu needs to be, set it to that width, and then
give it auto left and right margins. But that's not much better than
just setting the left margin to 15px.
Tried the auto options but no luck there.

>
Or leave it as width auto, make it text-align: center, and make the
items inside it display: inline or display: inline-block. This is a
bigger change though and may cause you more problems. Display:
inline-block is not supported in FF2.

So those are the options.

Ugh. Looks like I'm going to be stuck using the margin-left.

>
My recommendation: use display: table for decent browsers and just let
it align to the left in IE. It's not going to hurt anyone to have it on
the left.

But it will look like crud.

I've confirmed that the display:table works like a charm in FF but is
ignored in IE7.
>Also, when I started out my text was left justified but in the course
of throwing in multitudes of centering options, the menu text is now
centered as well. Ideally I'd like the text to be left justified.

The test page I am working on can be found here:
URL=<http://www.nss.org/testmenu/news.htm>

Remove text-align: center from #menu and #menu ul and remove
align="cente r" from the table containing #menu.
Thanks. Yeah, I was adding "centers" everywhere trying to find some
combination that would result in a centered nav bar.
>I also saw float: center in your stylesheet. There's no such thing!
Now removed.

>On the subject of centering, why not just go for an altogether less
centered design? It looks a bit outdated these days to centre
everything, probably because it's so much harder to do practically in
non-tables CSS so everyone gives up.

Because the existing design is centered and I am looking for a way to
replace the current menu - which is not only kind of ugly but very
limited in scope. The problem is everyone wants their stuff to appear
on the main site nav bar. I suggested a CSS only dropdown menu as a
way of reducing the spatial overhead while increasing the number of
links available. CSS only (no javascript) because the site is
supported by all volunteers so the less background knowledge required
the better.

>
>(2)

If you take a look at the picture at
URL=<http://www.nss.org/testmenu/Firefox.jpgyou will see that in
Firefox the top level buttons are even and that the drop down
component appears immediately below its parent.

If you look at URL=<http://www.nss.org/testmenu/IE7.jpg>, you will see
that in Internet Explorer 7 the dropdown is shifted to the right and
that the last top level button on the right doesn't fill in properly.

Is there a way to get the menu to behave the same in both Firefox and
IE? Note that I don't have access to either IE5 or 6 so have no idea
how the code fairs there.

I don't have (or want) access to any version of IE so can't help you
with this one.
Rats. Not only the above problems but with IE7 when the page first
loads, the right-most button is invisible until you actually
mouse-over the button immediately to its left.
But bear in mind also that your menus are not accessible
to people who don't have a mouse or pointing device.
Are there such? I've never accessed a link without using a mouse or
stylus. Can I assume that this is an issue for folks who are blind
and use some sort of reader? Is it that it's a drop-down menu that
creates the problem?

>That's no way to build a thriving extraterrestria l community.

Right but we need to start somewhere.

Check out this video of Stephen Hawking we just added to the site:
http://www.nss.org/resources/library...cy/hawking.htm
Thanks for your help Ben.



Best Regards, Jim
http://artsnova.com/blog
Jun 27 '08 #3
In article <sl************ *********@bowse r.marioworld>,
Ben C <sp******@spam. eggswrote:
I also saw float: center in your stylesheet. There's no such thing!
Now and then, I wonder about the usefulness of such a possibility!
Perhaps it would just complicate design work for no big gain.

On the subject of centering, why not just go for an altogether less
centered design?
Hear hear...
It looks a bit outdated these days to centre
everything, probably because it's so much harder to do practically in
non-tables CSS so everyone gives up.
To centre a whole website is one thing, but to centre a lot within the
main frame does not look good to my eye.

Rather than being old fashioned, I think it is just a naive aesthetic
and for this reason: it is the one simple design principle anyone can
come up with no matter how inexperienced, 'make things nice and
symmetrical".

Symmetry of *this* kind is obvious and generally easy to do. So it tends
to be something inexperienced people do (children do this a lot) - what
else can they do, given their experience and desire to make it 'nicely
laid out'.

--
dorayme
Jun 27 '08 #4
On 2008-04-29, Jim <Fa*********@as trodigitalNOT.o rgwrote:
Hi Ben,

On Tue, 29 Apr 2008 16:27:28 -0500, Ben C <sp******@spam. eggswrote:
[...]
>But bear in mind also that your menus are not accessible
to people who don't have a mouse or pointing device.

Are there such? I've never accessed a link without using a mouse or
stylus. Can I assume that this is an issue for folks who are blind
and use some sort of reader?
Could be, but also for situations like a browser running on a TV set
being controlled with a TV remote control.
Is it that it's a drop-down menu that creates the problem?
It's the fact that you need a mouse to make it drop it down.

If you make every link visible on the page then you can get around them
with TAB. The TV browser may have something smarter than TAB (i.e. 2D
rather than 1D) but it will be navigating between the same locations.

You could also do a menu with keypress handlers, but that would require
JS, and that's already considered poor for accessibility since people
turn it off.
>>That's no way to build a thriving extraterrestria l community.


Right but we need to start somewhere.

Check out this video of Stephen Hawking we just added to the site:
http://www.nss.org/resources/library...cy/hawking.htm
Interesting, thanks for the link.

I didn't realize SETI had more or less ruled out technological life
within 100 light-years. That's quite a few thousand stars to have
checked.

Now, Hawking says: "Personally , I favour the second possibility, that
primitive life is relatively common but that intelligent life is very
rare."

Intelligent but non-technological seems likely to be relatively common
if you extend the idea of ranking the probability of events in our own
history by how long it took for them to occur.
Jun 27 '08 #5
Jim
Hello dorayme,

On Wed, 30 Apr 2008 09:10:34 +1000, dorayme
<do************ @optusnet.com.a uwrote:
>In article <sl************ *********@bowse r.marioworld>,
Ben C <sp******@spam. eggswrote:
>It looks a bit outdated these days to centre
everything, probably because it's so much harder to do practically in
non-tables CSS so everyone gives up.


Rather than being old fashioned, I think it is just a naive aesthetic
and for this reason: it is the one simple design principle anyone can
come up with no matter how inexperienced, 'make things nice and
symmetrical" .

Symmetry of *this* kind is obvious and generally easy to do. So it tends
to be something inexperienced people do (children do this a lot) - what
else can they do, given their experience and desire to make it 'nicely
laid out'.

I have to take issue with your statements. For example, how many
framed pictures do you have hanging on your walls at home? Okay, now
in how many of those frames do you have the picture off-center?
Frankly I have never seen anyone frame a picture off-center. The
browser window is the picture frame and your content is the picture.
You can think of the white space on either side as being the matting.
To my eye, web sites that hug the left border of the "frame" with lots
of dead white space to the right look terrible.

Alternatively you could make your "picture" extend from one side of
the frame to the other. So, why don't newspapers or magazines or books
exhibit this feature? Because it is bad for readability. So to make a
web page more readable you don't want a line of text that extends from
one side of the screen to the other: you confine it to a narrower
space. Since we are confining our content to a narrower space, it
makes all the sense in the world to center that space within its
container.

As regarding easy, the only thing easier than centering is not
bothering to center - after all that takes no work whatsoever.

Best Regards, Jim
http://artsnova.com/blog
Jun 27 '08 #6
Jim wrote:
Hello dorayme,

On Wed, 30 Apr 2008 09:10:34 +1000, dorayme
<do************ @optusnet.com.a uwrote:
>In article <sl************ *********@bowse r.marioworld>,
Ben C <sp******@spam. eggswrote:
>>It looks a bit outdated these days to centre
everything, probably because it's so much harder to do practically in
non-tables CSS so everyone gives up.

Rather than being old fashioned, I think it is just a naive aesthetic
and for this reason: it is the one simple design principle anyone can
come up with no matter how inexperienced, 'make things nice and
symmetrical" .

Symmetry of *this* kind is obvious and generally easy to do. So it tends
to be something inexperienced people do (children do this a lot) - what
else can they do, given their experience and desire to make it 'nicely
laid out'.


I have to take issue with your statements. For example, how many
framed pictures do you have hanging on your walls at home? Okay, now
in how many of those frames do you have the picture off-center?

Actually when matting watercolors cutting the mat with all side equal
is, well, the sign of an amateur. Typically placing the image *above*
dead-center is more visually pleasing and appears "stable". Playing with
this balance intentionally can have interesting effects...
Frankly I have never seen anyone frame a picture off-center. The
browser window is the picture frame and your content is the picture.
You can think of the white space on either side as being the matting.
To my eye, web sites that hug the left border of the "frame" with lots
of dead white space to the right look terrible.
No one said you had to constrain your page's width! Folks who insist on
the world being bilaterally symmetrical! Always love the idiot architect
in the '60s that thought having a doorknob on the left or right was sooo
asymmetrical! Just loved watching visitors struggle as they tried to
figure out how to open the damn door!

--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
Jun 27 '08 #7
Jim wrote:
On Wed, 30 Apr 2008 09:10:34 +1000, dorayme
<do************ @optusnet.com.a uwrote:
>Rather than being old fashioned, I think it is just a naive aesthetic
and for this reason: it is the one simple design principle anyone can
come up with no matter how inexperienced, 'make things nice and
symmetrical" .

Symmetry of *this* kind is obvious and generally easy to do. So it tends
to be something inexperienced people do (children do this a lot) - what
else can they do, given their experience and desire to make it 'nicely
laid out'.

I have to take issue with your statements. For example, how many
framed pictures do you have hanging on your walls at home? Okay, now
in how many of those frames do you have the picture off-center?
Frankly I have never seen anyone frame a picture off-center.
I have - particularly when the picture is part of a framed collage.
Collages rarely have symmetry about the vertical axis (and if they do,
they tend to look forced and artificial).

And most web pages are collages: they contain multiple heterogeneous
visual elements.
The
browser window is the picture frame and your content is the picture.
I don't believe that's how users typically perceive web pages.
(Indeed, for a presentation at an academic conference in the fall, my
coauthor and I will be displaying some screenshots of web pages that
we've blurred, flipped about the vertical axis, and otherwise
distorted, precisely to encourage users to look at them as wholes
rather than visually traversing the various parts.)
You can think of the white space on either side as being the matting.
To my eye, web sites that hug the left border of the "frame" with lots
of dead white space to the right look terrible.
You probably want *some* margin, rather than putting content right
against window decoration, but I think asymmetric layouts with
reasonable whitespace often look as or more appealing than centered ones.
So to make a
web page more readable you don't want a line of text that extends from
one side of the screen to the other: you confine it to a narrower
space.
Do you believe the user is incapable of setting a comfortable column
width? *My* browser rarely occupies the whole screen - generally only
when I want to view a page that some nitwit designer has made too wide.
--
Michael Wojcik
Micro Focus
Jun 27 '08 #8
Jim
Hi Jonathan,

On Wed, 30 Apr 2008 10:31:03 -0400, "Jonathan N. Little"
<lw*****@centra l.netwrote:
>Jim wrote:
>I have to take issue with your statements. For example, how many
framed pictures do you have hanging on your walls at home? Okay, now
in how many of those frames do you have the picture off-center?


Actually when matting watercolors cutting the mat with all side equal
is, well, the sign of an amateur.
Not just watercolors.

>Typically placing the image *above*
dead-center is more visually pleasing and appears "stable". Playing with
this balance intentionally can have interesting effects...

We're not talking about vertical centering - it's horizontal centering
that's the issue. In matting artwork, you do center horizontally and
generally vertically as well but somtimes you raise your art
vertically so there is more matting at the bottom. However, you do
not lower your art so that there is more matting at the top.
>Frankly I have never seen anyone frame a picture off-center. The
browser window is the picture frame and your content is the picture.
You can think of the white space on either side as being the matting.
To my eye, web sites that hug the left border of the "frame" with lots
of dead white space to the right look terrible.

No one said you had to constrain your page's width!
Generally web sites do have textual content. Readability says you want
to limit your line width. Assuming that you are going to be reasonable
and limit your design to 2-3 reasonablly wide columns means that your
design will likely be narrower than the available screen width. So
what do you do with that extra horizontal space? Do you let it all
congregate on the right, on the left, or do you evenly distribute it?
>Folks who insist on
the world being bilaterally symmetrical! Always love the idiot architect
in the '60s that thought having a doorknob on the left or right was sooo
asymmetrical ! Just loved watching visitors struggle as they tried to
figure out how to open the damn door!

That's not a good analogy because the placement of a doorknob is based
on functionality. Graphic design is aesthetics and usability driven
and symmetry is a part of that.


Best Regards, Jim
http://artsnova.com/blog
Jun 27 '08 #9
Jim
Hi Michael ,

On Wed, 30 Apr 2008 11:45:49 -0400, Michael Wojcik
<mw*****@newsgu y.comwrote:
>Jim wrote:
>I have to take issue with your statements. For example, how many
framed pictures do you have hanging on your walls at home? Okay, now
in how many of those frames do you have the picture off-center?
Frankly I have never seen anyone frame a picture off-center.

I have - particularly when the picture is part of a framed collage.
Collages rarely have symmetry about the vertical axis (and if they do,
they tend to look forced and artificial).

The issue is not vertical symmetry but horizontal symmetry.
The
browser window is the picture frame and your content is the picture.

I don't believe that's how users typically perceive web pages.
Right but as a designer your are creating a coherent "image" within
the confines of a browser's window.

>(Indeed, for a presentation at an academic conference in the fall, my
coauthor and I will be displaying some screenshots of web pages that
we've blurred, flipped about the vertical axis, and otherwise
distorted, precisely to encourage users to look at them as wholes
rather than visually traversing the various parts.)
That's interesting. But how does that help a user navigate or use a
page? My "driver" has been to try and create web pages that are first
useable with attractiveness taking second.

In this case I am trying to create a better horizontal nav bar to
improve the existing site's functionality. The existing page design
for the site is centered. Therefore I need the nav bar to be centered.
To have the nav bar as the only element on the page that is left
justified would be totally (_fill_in_the_b lank_).
>You can think of the white space on either side as being the matting.
To my eye, web sites that hug the left border of the "frame" with lots
of dead white space to the right look terrible.

You probably want *some* margin, rather than putting content right
against window decoration,
Definitely.
>but I think asymmetric layouts with
reasonable whitespace often look as or more appealing than centered ones.

One of the guys own our team advanced that argument. I initially
agreed with him but after looking around at other sites and reading a
number of articles on the subject (courtesy of Google), I came to the
conclusion that centered did look better. Note that here I am talking
about the web page layout itself - a separate issue from that of the
nav bar.
>
>So to make a
web page more readable you don't want a line of text that extends from
one side of the screen to the other: you confine it to a narrower
space.

Do you believe the user is incapable of setting a comfortable column
width?
No but why should they have to. I use tabbed browsing. I would hate to
have to resize my browser each and every time I switched to a
different web page.

>*My* browser rarely occupies the whole screen - generally only
when I want to view a page that some nitwit designer has made too wide.

I always have my browser at full length but agree 100% about the
annoyance of too-wide web pages.
PS. Do you have any plans to put your presentation online? I would
like to know more about it.

Thanks.


Best Regards, Jim
http://artsnova.com/blog
Jun 27 '08 #10

This thread has been closed and replies have been disabled. Please start a new discussion.

Similar topics

4
3838
by: JesusFreak | last post by:
From: us_traveller@yahoo.com (JesusFreak) Newsgroups: microsoft.public.scripting.jscript Subject: toolbar script problem NNTP-Posting-Host: 192.92.126.136 Recently, I downloaded the following beautiful script "http://javascript.internet.com/navigation/toolbar-menu.html". It works like a charm. I made my webpage in frames, where the nav-frame shows the menubar, so whenever I click a link in the menubar, it opens in the frame below. But...
4
13271
by: Papa Legba | last post by:
I'm looking for a Seeking pure CSS horizontal menu with sub-menus which drop down on mouse over. Compatible with as many browsers as possible. Any ideas?
0
1598
by: Lucas, Todd | last post by:
Hello everyone! I'm having a problem with a WebControl that I'm designing for a Menu. I've been at it for about 3 weeks now, and can't seem to get around this problem. So I'm hoping that someone can help me ... My environment: VS 2003 v7.1.3088, Win2K v5.0.2195 SP3, IE6 v6.0.2800.1106 browser. I have a class (C3Menu) derived from WebControl, with a property (MenuItems) that is a collection of menu items. The collection property is...
0
1277
by: Randy Smith | last post by:
Hi All, My menu control doesn't "dropdown". The "Home" menu item doesn't appear, nor does the "Jobs" item. And, the 2nd group (Labor and Materials) in web.sitemap doesn't appear at all. The Here's what web.sitemap looks like: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <siteMap xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/AspNet/SiteMap-File-1.0" > <siteMapNode title="Home" url="ShowAllJobs.aspx">
2
9321
by: Sergio E. | last post by:
Hi group, I write this post with the following question: How can I to build an absolutely horizontal menu?, This is because I can't find how can I configure the menu component of asp.net 2.0 in vs2005. I need somthing like this: the root menu in this form
1
6614
by: camphor | last post by:
hi, I have a single column webpage with a horizontal dropdown menu and am trying to make the nav bar fit across the page, the column is 800px, it looks ok in dreamweaver 8 but when I test it in firefox, the nav bar which is a horizontal blue stripe with the links written inside it doesn't stretch the whole 800px, also how would you align the words in the submenu to the main menu, currently the submenus are centered html <body> <div...
5
5842
by: jerry101 | last post by:
Hi, I've been working on a horizontal drop down menu today, and I can get it to display perfectly in everything bar IE6. Basically instead of them lining up horizontally, they line up vertically instead. And this only happens when I don't give the LI in the menu list and fixed width, which I don't want because if I have a fixed width the menu list get's too long due to some words being longer than others and then it doesn't fit on the...
1
3143
by: paulyXvpf | last post by:
Hello javascript folks, PROBLEM: Javascript dropdown problem in IE 6 and IE7 DESCRIPTION: menu falls behind a container box on web page COMMENTS: It works fine in Firefox but not in IE 6/7 versions Notice this URL using IE6/7: http://iimaaconference.com.yourtempsite.com/
0
8619
marktang
by: marktang | last post by:
ONU (Optical Network Unit) is one of the key components for providing high-speed Internet services. Its primary function is to act as an endpoint device located at the user's premises. However, people are often confused as to whether an ONU can Work As a Router. In this blog post, we’ll explore What is ONU, What Is Router, ONU & Router’s main usage, and What is the difference between ONU and Router. Let’s take a closer look ! Part I. Meaning of...
0
8559
by: Hystou | last post by:
Most computers default to English, but sometimes we require a different language, especially when relocating. Forgot to request a specific language before your computer shipped? No problem! You can effortlessly switch the default language on Windows 10 without reinstalling. I'll walk you through it. First, let's disable language synchronization. With a Microsoft account, language settings sync across devices. To prevent any complications,...
0
9112
Oralloy
by: Oralloy | last post by:
Hello folks, I am unable to find appropriate documentation on the type promotion of bit-fields when using the generalised comparison operator "<=>". The problem is that using the GNU compilers, it seems that the internal comparison operator "<=>" tries to promote arguments from unsigned to signed. This is as boiled down as I can make it. Here is my compilation command: g++-12 -std=c++20 -Wnarrowing bit_field.cpp Here is the code in...
1
8826
by: Hystou | last post by:
Overview: Windows 11 and 10 have less user interface control over operating system update behaviour than previous versions of Windows. In Windows 11 and 10, there is no way to turn off the Windows Update option using the Control Panel or Settings app; it automatically checks for updates and installs any it finds, whether you like it or not. For most users, this new feature is actually very convenient. If you want to control the update process,...
0
8818
tracyyun
by: tracyyun | last post by:
Dear forum friends, With the development of smart home technology, a variety of wireless communication protocols have appeared on the market, such as Zigbee, Z-Wave, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, etc. Each protocol has its own unique characteristics and advantages, but as a user who is planning to build a smart home system, I am a bit confused by the choice of these technologies. I'm particularly interested in Zigbee because I've heard it does some...
1
6487
isladogs
by: isladogs | last post by:
The next Access Europe User Group meeting will be on Wednesday 1 May 2024 starting at 18:00 UK time (6PM UTC+1) and finishing by 19:30 (7.30PM). In this session, we are pleased to welcome a new presenter, Adolph Dupré who will be discussing some powerful techniques for using class modules. He will explain when you may want to use classes instead of User Defined Types (UDT). For example, to manage the data in unbound forms. Adolph will...
0
5832
by: conductexam | last post by:
I have .net C# application in which I am extracting data from word file and save it in database particularly. To store word all data as it is I am converting the whole word file firstly in HTML and then checking html paragraph one by one. At the time of converting from word file to html my equations which are in the word document file was convert into image. Globals.ThisAddIn.Application.ActiveDocument.Select();...
0
4575
by: adsilva | last post by:
A Windows Forms form does not have the event Unload, like VB6. What one acts like?
3
1971
bsmnconsultancy
by: bsmnconsultancy | last post by:
In today's digital era, a well-designed website is crucial for businesses looking to succeed. Whether you're a small business owner or a large corporation in Toronto, having a strong online presence can significantly impact your brand's success. BSMN Consultancy, a leader in Website Development in Toronto offers valuable insights into creating effective websites that not only look great but also perform exceptionally well. In this comprehensive...

By using Bytes.com and it's services, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

To disable or enable advertisements and analytics tracking please visit the manage ads & tracking page.