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Expected Impact of Changing Logging Type

P: n/a
I have a production database that I need to change the logging type
from circular to archived so that I can do online backups. The
database is not particularly large, but is used by many people. What
impact from the users perspective can I expect? Is the only impact
behind the scenes in the db manager? Thanks in advance for any help.
Matt

Mar 16 '06 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
Matt wrote:
I have a production database that I need to change the logging type
from circular to archived so that I can do online backups. The
database is not particularly large, but is used by many people. What
impact from the users perspective can I expect? Is the only impact
behind the scenes in the db manager? Thanks in advance for any help.


There will be no impact no the user. DB2 has to manage the log files now
and as long as there is enough disk space (or a proper user exit archiving
the completed log files away), you don't have to worry.

--
Knut Stolze
DB2 Information Integration Development
IBM Germany
Mar 16 '06 #2

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Thanks for the quick response. I appreciate it very much. Matt

Mar 16 '06 #3

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In article <dv**********@lc03.rz.uni-jena.de>, st****@de.ibm.com says...
Matt wrote:
I have a production database that I need to change the logging type
from circular to archived so that I can do online backups. The
database is not particularly large, but is used by many people. What
impact from the users perspective can I expect? Is the only impact
behind the scenes in the db manager? Thanks in advance for any help.


There will be no impact no the user. DB2 has to manage the log files now
and as long as there is enough disk space (or a proper user exit archiving
the completed log files away), you don't have to worry.


But after changing the logging type a full offline backup is needed,
which means no users are allowed to connect. So the right time for
changing the logging type is just before creating a full backup.
Mar 16 '06 #4

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In general database logging affects performance of bulk data
modifications from SQL (INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE) because the default
behaviour is to log table data updates. However, if your database is
fairly small it may not be an issue. After you turned on the logging
you would need to monitor performance anyways to see whether
performance degrades.

-Eugene

Mar 16 '06 #5

P: n/a
Ian
Eugene F wrote:
In general database logging affects performance of bulk data
modifications from SQL (INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE) because the default
behaviour is to log table data updates. However, if your database is
fairly small it may not be an issue. After you turned on the logging
you would need to monitor performance anyways to see whether
performance degrades.


Yes, but this is irrelevant when comparing circular to archive logging.
DB2 always uses the transaction log for recovery. It's just a matter of
whether we want to keep the old log files or not.

Mar 16 '06 #6

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Agreed... sorry for the confusion... :-(
-Eugene

Mar 16 '06 #7

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