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SQL0289 when Alter table space

P: n/a
I am trying to resize a DMS tablespace container in a database.
There is only one table in this tablespace and it is at 89% full
currently. The command executes successfully but still the size
doesn't change (trying both through the alter TS GUI screen and typing
the alter command in the Command Center).
I read in this group that I needed to perform a reorg on the table for
the change to take effect--that is when I get the 289 error. So I
tried to add an additional container but that didn't work either as I
got the SQL0289 error again. What is the problem?

I have plenty of disk space (75.7 gb). Using WSE DB2 v8.1 FP5 on Win2K.

Nov 12 '05 #1
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P: n/a
It would help if you mentioned the error code you get when you either try to
alter and/or add a container???
Regards, Pierre.
--
Pierre Saint-Jacques
SES Consultants Inc.
514-737-4515
<ra***********@ins.state.il.us> a écrit dans le message de news:
11**********************@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups. com...
I am trying to resize a DMS tablespace container in a database.
There is only one table in this tablespace and it is at 89% full
currently. The command executes successfully but still the size
doesn't change (trying both through the alter TS GUI screen and typing
the alter command in the Command Center).
I read in this group that I needed to perform a reorg on the table for
the change to take effect--that is when I get the 289 error. So I
tried to add an additional container but that didn't work either as I
got the SQL0289 error again. What is the problem?

I have plenty of disk space (75.7 gb). Using WSE DB2 v8.1 FP5 on Win2K.


Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
Don't know whether this can help or not... but you can keep this in
mind.

1) if you do "list tablespaces show detail", you should see a "status"
field. If the tablespace is in the "rebalancing" state, you need to
wait until the tablespace is in the "normal" state.

2) in UNIX, there is a 2gb file size limitation (I think this can be
controlled by ulimit command). to get around this limitation, I think
you can add container. This should not happen in windows.

3) if your index is created in a different DMS tablespace, you can
check whether the index tablespace is running out of space or not.

4) if your index is create in the same DMS tablespace, (caution) you
can consider dropping the index first, hopefully, to get around the
existing 289 problem. Then you can increase the size of the
tablespace. Then you can recreate the index.

5) all of the containers' size should be the same. If your containers
have different size, as soon as one container runs out of space, you
will see SQL0289.

6) if you can read db2 traces, you should be able to pinpoint the
origin of SQL0289.

Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
Don't know whether this can help or not... but you can keep this in
mind.

1) if you do "list tablespaces show detail", you should see a "status"
field. If the tablespace is in the "rebalancing" state, you need to
wait until the tablespace is in the "normal" state.

2) in UNIX, there is a 2gb file size limitation (I think this can be
controlled by ulimit command). to get around this limitation, I think
you can add container. This should not happen in windows.

3) if your index is created in a different DMS tablespace, you can
check whether the index tablespace is running out of space or not.

4) if your index is create in the same DMS tablespace, (caution) you
can consider dropping the index first, hopefully, to get around the
existing 289 problem. Then you can increase the size of the
tablespace. Then you can recreate the index.

5) all of the containers' size should be the same. If your containers
have different size, as soon as one container runs out of space, you
will see SQL0289.

6) if you can read db2 traces, you should be able to pinpoint the
origin of SQL0289.

Nov 12 '05 #4

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