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DB2 Client Access Licensing Question

P: n/a
DB2
Hello, everyone.

Our developers are wondering if their swing Java-based application
connecting to a DB2 server through JDBC requires the DB2 client access
license (CAL) per user.
They've got the Java app installed on PCs connecting a DB2 server.

They believe that the above scenario does not requires DB2 CALs.

I think as long as an application connects to a DB2 server requires a
DB2 CAL whethere it is a ODBC or JDBC connection.
Furthermore, there are also web-based connections to the DB2 via Tomcat
from the same PCs where the swing-based apps are.
Is my belief wrong?
Can some licensing experts give their opinions please?

Thanks.

Nov 12 '05 #1
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9 Replies


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"DB2" <pi****@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@c13g2000cwb.googlegro ups.com...
Hello, everyone.

Our developers are wondering if their swing Java-based application
connecting to a DB2 server through JDBC requires the DB2 client access
license (CAL) per user.
They've got the Java app installed on PCs connecting a DB2 server.

They believe that the above scenario does not requires DB2 CALs.

I think as long as an application connects to a DB2 server requires a
DB2 CAL whethere it is a ODBC or JDBC connection.
Furthermore, there are also web-based connections to the DB2 via Tomcat
from the same PCs where the swing-based apps are.
Is my belief wrong?
Can some licensing experts give their opinions please?

Thanks.

If you are connecting to DB2 server on Linux, UNIX, or Windows, you do not
need any license. You can connect directly without a client with a type 2
driver (and some 3rd party drivers).

If you are connecting to DB2 on mainframe or AS/400 you need a license for
DB2 Connect.

Please mention your OS and DB2 release of your DB server in future posts.
Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
DB2
Thanks for your quick reply.
The OS platform will be strictly Windows-based.
New deployments will be using DB2 v 8.x. There might be some existing
DB2 v.7.x

So why a ODBC connection requires a CAL while a JDBC does not?

Thanks.

Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
"DB2" <pi****@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@c13g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Thanks for your quick reply.
The OS platform will be strictly Windows-based.
New deployments will be using DB2 v 8.x. There might be some existing
DB2 v.7.x

So why a ODBC connection requires a CAL while a JDBC does not?

Thanks.

I don't know what a CAL is (my ignorance). DB2 clients are free. The type 2
driver is just another type of DB2 client.
Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
To clarify, you can use ODBC, JDBC, JDBC type-4 if you wish to access
DB2 on Linux, UNIX, Windows. There are, however, two different types of
server licenses: Enterprise Standard Edition and Workgroup Edition. ESE
is licensed on a processor basis ... and processors on that server must
be licensed for ESE ... no matter how many client connections you have.
WE is different, however, as it has a per-user license option. If you
have that option, then you must license each DB2 client connection that
comes into that server.

Hope this helps.

Larry Edelstein

DB2 wrote:
Thanks for your quick reply.
The OS platform will be strictly Windows-based.
New deployments will be using DB2 v 8.x. There might be some existing
DB2 v.7.x

So why a ODBC connection requires a CAL while a JDBC does not?

Thanks.


Nov 12 '05 #5

P: n/a
"Larry" <la***@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:Pt*******************@fe09.lga...
To clarify, you can use ODBC, JDBC, JDBC type-4 if you wish to access
DB2 on Linux, UNIX, Windows. There are, however, two different types of
server licenses: Enterprise Standard Edition and Workgroup Edition. ESE
is licensed on a processor basis ... and processors on that server must
be licensed for ESE ... no matter how many client connections you have.
WE is different, however, as it has a per-user license option. If you
have that option, then you must license each DB2 client connection that
comes into that server.

Hope this helps.

Larry Edelstein

But you can use connection pooling to limit the number of simultaneous
connections, without worrying about how many clients think they are
connected.

Right?
Nov 12 '05 #6

P: n/a
Mark,

I think you must still license the # of clients that connect into the
db. If you have 100 clients and pool them into 50 connections, you pay
for 100 clients.

Larry Edelstein

Mark A wrote:
"Larry" <la***@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:Pt*******************@fe09.lga...
To clarify, you can use ODBC, JDBC, JDBC type-4 if you wish to access
DB2 on Linux, UNIX, Windows. There are, however, two different types of
server licenses: Enterprise Standard Edition and Workgroup Edition. ESE
is licensed on a processor basis ... and processors on that server must
be licensed for ESE ... no matter how many client connections you have.
WE is different, however, as it has a per-user license option. If you
have that option, then you must license each DB2 client connection that
comes into that server.

Hope this helps.

Larry Edelstein


But you can use connection pooling to limit the number of simultaneous
connections, without worrying about how many clients think they are
connected.

Right?


Nov 12 '05 #7

P: n/a
"Larry" <la***@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:Zw*******************@fe09.lga...
Mark,

I think you must still license the # of clients that connect into the
db. If you have 100 clients and pool them into 50 connections, you pay
for 100 clients.

Larry Edelstein

Hmmm. I may have to bet you an Anthony's Pizza on that one.
Nov 12 '05 #8

P: n/a
There is also a Workgroup Edition unlimited users version. If you have more than about 20 users this is the way to go. It is a per processor license with a maximum number of processors.(4 I think)

Jeff
Mark A<no****@nowhere.com> 01/02/2005 12:35:23 am >>>
"Larry" <la***@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:Zw*******************@fe09.lga... Mark,

I think you must still license the # of clients that connect into the
db. If you have 100 clients and pool them into 50 connections, you pay
for 100 clients.

Larry Edelstein

Hmmm. I may have to bet you an Anthony's Pizza on that one.


Nov 12 '05 #9

P: n/a
DB2
Thank you everyone.

I really appreciate everyone's input.

Nov 12 '05 #10

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