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Universal JDBC Driver ....

P: n/a
Read this about the Universal JDBC Driver....

"In a Type 2 mode, the Universal JDBC driver provides local
application performance gains (because it avoids using TCP/IP protocol
to communicate to the DB2 server). "

Wht does it mean by "local" application performance? In type 2 mode,
it is a pre-requisite that all the databases that the application
running at the client need to be cataloged (through CCA or otherwise)
on the client; Most of the installations I have seen using TCPIP
'nodes' for cataloging (with CATALOG TCPIP NODE... command); so how
does the driver avoid using TCP/IP protocol?

TIA
Raquel.
Nov 12 '05 #1
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P: n/a
aj
A type 2 jdbc driver (app driver) requires, at a minimum, a
DB2 runtime client to be installed at the client. The
application talks thru the runtime client directly to the
DB2 server.

A type 3 jdbc driver (net driver) does not require any
local runtime client, but does require a daemon at the
server. The application talks across the network thru
the daemon at the server to the DB2 server. The daemon
is called db2jd, btw. You start it w/ db2jstrt.

A type 4 jdbc driver (universal) does not require any
additional s/w on either the client or the server. The
application talks directly to the DB2 server using native
DB2 protocol. Because there is not an extra layer to go
thru on the client or the server, things are faster.

I'm not sure if its completely accurate to say that the type
4 jdbc driver avoids using the TCP/IP protocol - a better
was to think of it is that the type 4 driver operates
lower on the OSI stack - it is lower level..

HTH

allen
Raquel wrote:
Read this about the Universal JDBC Driver....

"In a Type 2 mode, the Universal JDBC driver provides local
application performance gains (because it avoids using TCP/IP protocol
to communicate to the DB2 server). "

Wht does it mean by "local" application performance? In type 2 mode,
it is a pre-requisite that all the databases that the application
running at the client need to be cataloged (through CCA or otherwise)
on the client; Most of the installations I have seen using TCPIP
'nodes' for cataloging (with CATALOG TCPIP NODE... command); so how
does the driver avoid using TCP/IP protocol?

TIA
Raquel.

Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
Only *remote* nodes need to be cataloged using CATALOG TCPIP NODE. Your
local system automatically qualifies as a node. When you create a database,
it will be created on the local node. Do a "db2 list db directory" with a
local and a remote database cataloged and you'll see it looks like:

System Database Directory

Number of entries in the directory = 2

Database 1 entry:

Database alias = RMTSAMP
Database name = SAMPLE
Node name = RMTNODE
Database release level = a.00
Comment =
Directory entry type = Remote
Catalog database partition number = -1
Alternate server hostname =
Alternate server port number =

Database 2 entry:

Database alias = SAMPLE
Database name = SAMPLE
Database drive = D:\DB2
Database release level = a.00
Comment =
Directory entry type = Indirect
Catalog database partition number = 0
Alternate server hostname =
Alternate server port number =

Note the different "Directory entry type".

Since you could (if you wanted to) use a T4 driver to connect to a local
database, the doc is saying that in that case you'd get better performance
from a T2 driver.
--
Larry Menard
IBM Workstation Database (DB2) Information Development, Samples Coordinator
Defender of Geese and of All Things Natural
"Raquel" <ra****************@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:9a**************************@posting.google.c om...
Read this about the Universal JDBC Driver....

"In a Type 2 mode, the Universal JDBC driver provides local
application performance gains (because it avoids using TCP/IP protocol
to communicate to the DB2 server). "

Wht does it mean by "local" application performance? In type 2 mode,
it is a pre-requisite that all the databases that the application
running at the client need to be cataloged (through CCA or otherwise)
on the client; Most of the installations I have seen using TCPIP
'nodes' for cataloging (with CATALOG TCPIP NODE... command); so how
does the driver avoid using TCP/IP protocol?

TIA
Raquel.

Nov 12 '05 #3

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