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database market share 2003

http://biz.yahoo.com/rc/040526/tech_...etshare_1.html

Interesting to see that database sales for windows is more than
Unix.
Nov 12 '05
346 16674
"Daniel Morgan" <da******@x.was hington.edu> wrote in message
news:1086927557 .861975@yasure. ..
And please let me asset to you that code I have written in my 35+ years,
many of which were IBM DB2 on mainframes ... that code could not be
moved, without modification, to a Windows or other platform. Even
basic things like how many characters long is the name of a table
would/could change.

Is that no longer true?

I find it hard to believe that anyone would assert that DB2 on OS/390
where it is shared-everything can be put onto a different operating
system where the DB2 architecture is shared-nothing and think it will
run as is. Please tell me if I am incorrect.

You see the one nice thing about some of DB2's competitors is that
the code written is 100% compatible across operating systems ... not
even requiring a recompilation.

--
Daniel Morgan


No, that is not true. The OS/390 (MVS or whatever) COBOL compiler you might
have used with Oracle on OS/390 is not compatible with any Windows, Linux,
or UNIX COBOL compiler (assuming you even wanted to use COBOL on those
platforms).

Initially, there were many incompatibiliti es between DB2 on OS/2 (the
predecessor of DB2 for Linux, UNIX, and Windows). Those differences at the
DML level are very few now (especially with the release of DB2 version 8 for
z/OS).

The reason that Oracle uses the same code base for all platforms has nothing
to do with portability, it has to do getting a product out the door with a
few changes as possible to work on a particular OS. The fact that Oracle on
does not work very well on OS/390 is a testament to the fact that such a
strategy is mostly a marketing one, and did not produce excellent products
that customers want (at least not on OS/390).

The portability issue is mostly a red herring. Microsoft SQL Server is
selling quite well even though it only runs on Windows. On the platforms
that DB2 competes vigorously with Oracle (Linux, UNIX, and Windows) the DB2
code base is identical on all those platforms.
Nov 12 '05 #181
Mark A wrote:
"Daniel Morgan" <da******@x.was hington.edu> wrote in message
news:1086927557 .861975@yasure. ..
And please let me asset to you that code I have written in my 35+ years,
many of which were IBM DB2 on mainframes ... that code could not be
moved, without modification, to a Windows or other platform. Even
basic things like how many characters long is the name of a table
would/could change.

Is that no longer true?

I find it hard to believe that anyone would assert that DB2 on OS/390
where it is shared-everything can be put onto a different operating
system where the DB2 architecture is shared-nothing and think it will
run as is. Please tell me if I am incorrect.

You see the one nice thing about some of DB2's competitors is that
the code written is 100% compatible across operating systems ... not
even requiring a recompilation.

--
Daniel Morgan

No, that is not true. The OS/390 (MVS or whatever) COBOL compiler you might
have used with Oracle on OS/390 is not compatible with any Windows, Linux,
or UNIX COBOL compiler (assuming you even wanted to use COBOL on those
platforms).

Initially, there were many incompatibiliti es between DB2 on OS/2 (the
predecessor of DB2 for Linux, UNIX, and Windows). Those differences at the
DML level are very few now (especially with the release of DB2 version 8 for
z/OS).

The reason that Oracle uses the same code base for all platforms has nothing
to do with portability, it has to do getting a product out the door with a
few changes as possible to work on a particular OS. The fact that Oracle on
does not work very well on OS/390 is a testament to the fact that such a
strategy is mostly a marketing one, and did not produce excellent products
that customers want (at least not on OS/390).

The portability issue is mostly a red herring. Microsoft SQL Server is
selling quite well even though it only runs on Windows. On the platforms
that DB2 competes vigorously with Oracle (Linux, UNIX, and Windows) the DB2
code base is identical on all those platforms.


Thanks for the clarification.

The reason Oracle doesn't concentrate on OS/390, if that is the case,
might also relate to the difficulty of selling into a marketshare very
carefully managed by IBM. I know that was the case when I last worked
on that class of machine.

--
Daniel Morgan
http://www.outreach.washington.edu/e...ad/oad_crs.asp
http://www.outreach.washington.edu/e...oa/aoa_crs.asp
da******@x.wash ington.edu
(replace 'x' with a 'u' to reply)

Nov 12 '05 #182
"Daniel Morgan" <da******@x.was hington.edu> wrote in message
news:1086929808 .312585@yasure. ..

Thanks for the clarification.

The reason Oracle doesn't concentrate on OS/390, if that is the case,
might also relate to the difficulty of selling into a marketshare very
carefully managed by IBM. I know that was the case when I last worked
on that class of machine.

--
Daniel Morgan


You make it sound like IBM has the power of the mafia. I don't think so.

Actually, a surprising number of companies have purchased Oracle for OS/390.
Oracle gave me 5 references in the Fortune top 25 companies in the US. I
checked all 5 out, and all 5 purchased it, but not one was using it for a
production system.
Nov 12 '05 #183
If one submitts an article to IDUG or DBM Tech it is _mandatory_ to
clarify the applicability in the title if a talk is not cross-platform.


Here are session titles from this years IDUG Conferences - very few of
them cross platform, and not a single one with any sign of platform
applicability. I guess we need to differ of what _mandatory_ means as well.

2PC: DB2 is from Mars & WebServers are from Venus
60 DB2 UDB Tips in 60 Minutes
A List of DB2 Top Ten Lists In which we ponder numerouse DB2 topics for
learning
Amaze Your Friends and Impress Your Family: More Details of DB2 UDB
Internals
An insider's look at the next version of DB2
And I Thought I Knew all There Was to Know about DB2
Archiving Data into an “Offline” DB2 Database
Are your DB2 Tools ready for the latest version of DB2 ?
Automated DB2 Release Migrations
Automated Statistics Collection with DB2 V8.2
Automating DB2 Structure Changes
Autonomic DB2-simplicity/performance, availability
Availability 101 for DB2
Benchmarking a DB2 Application
Best practices for managing DB2 Large Objects
Building and Maintaining DB2 UDB Data Warehouses
Considering "Dipsies" - New Indexes for DB2 V8
Continuous Data Protection in DB2 Environments
DB2 - Ready for Java
DB2 and the Internet – 17 Performance Tips
DB2 And Workload Manager: Setting Optimal Goals
DB2 and XML
DB2 Application Development - v8 update
DB2 Application Development; Triggers / Stored Procedures / UDF’s
DB2 Application Development; XML / .NET / JAVA / Web Services
DB2 B&R Speed is still the most critical demand
DB2 Catalog and Migration: past, present & future
DB2 Cube Views: the OLAP-aware RDBMS
DB2 Design Advisor: More than just index selection
DB2 HA with VERITAS Cluster Products
DB2 in a .NET World
DB2 Kernel - The Inside Tour
DB2 Memory: Impacts on Application Performance.
DB2 Stored Procedures Masterclass
DB2 UDB and Grid Computing
DB2 UDB High Performance Design
DB2 UDB in 2004. A Technology Update!
DB2 UDB Internals : Indepth (In 2-days)
DB2 UDB Internals for Administrators : Complete with V8 Details
DB2 UDB V8 : Exploiting it's New Advancements in High Availability
DB2 UDB V8 Database Administration Certification Preparation
DB2 V8 SQL and Performance Enhancements
DB2 V8 Stored Procedures and WLM – Get Ready Now!
DB2 V8 System Point-in-Time Recovery for ERP
DB2 Version 8 - Partitioning Changes
DB2 Version 8 for Application Developers
Designing and building a 24X7 database using DB2
End-to-End DB2 UDB Performance and Management Solutions
Enterprise DB2 Monitoring On The Cheap
Fast Track To Optimal DB2 Performance
Get Ready for DB2 V8 – Improving Access Paths without Risk
Get the Latest on DB2 V8 Straight From the Source – IBM’s DB2 Lead
Strategist
Getting More Kicks out of DB2 Performance Data
Getting the Most out of UDB Monitoring and Tuning
Hands-on programming - DB2 Application Development
Health Checking Your DB2 System
High Availability and Disaster Recovery in DB2 UDB
HOW DB2 HAS FACED A DISASTER RECOVERY SIMULATION
How To Avoid Common DB2 Implementation Mistakes
How to compare instances of DB2 Objects.
IBM DB2 Administration and Performance Tools
IBM DB2 Cube Views -- Large Customer Case Study
Implementing and Monitoring DB2 UDB replication
Inside DB2's Backup and Recovery
Integrating EMC Storage Technologies into DB2 UDB Database Solutions
JDBC Best Practices for DB2 Programmers
Key design in DB2
Managing Query Workload with your DB2 UDB Database
Memory Management in DB2 UDB - V8 Updates
Monitoring and Tracking Availability with UDB
OLAP in DB2: MDCs, MQTs, and Cube Views
Performance Tuning in Large DB2 Environments
Practical Techniques for DB2 Application Tuning
Recovery Management for DB2
SAP and DB2 : Mission Impossible or Pretty Woman ?
SQL in DB2 UDB V8: Changes, Challenges and Quirks
Test Data Privacy and DB2 Application Testing Solutions
The Doctor is In! Advanced Performance Diagnostics in DB2
The Frugal Data Warehouse - Doing more with DB2
The Ties That BIND DB2
Time-Delayed Log-Based DB2 UDB Replication with Aivant DBShadow
Too Much Data in my DB2! What is Active Archiving?
Tuning DB2 for the New Galaxy
Tuning your DB2 Pools How much memory do you Really Need?
Unicode and DB2 V8, what you need to know
Ways to access DB2 from a Java/web application
What's new (and coming) in DB2 UDB in 2004.

Nov 12 '05 #184
Jean-David Beyer wrote:

I am not pining for IBM IMS/DB and CICS, or IBM IMS/DB and IMS/DC.
Is anyone?


hmmm - i also forgot to allow for the cross-posting. I'm talking about the
steady stream of nay-sayers that are still having panic attacks after the
IBM takeover of Informix.

Although I agree that IBM is a major player in the IT Axis of Evil, I also
believe that IBM is the bestest thing that could have happened to Informix,
apart, perhaps, from Informix itself keeping it's shit together over the
last few years instead of being abused by corporate raiders etc.

Some people are still remembering the Alamo a little too much.
Nov 12 '05 #185
Captain Pedantic wrote:
"Andrew Hamm" <ah***@mail.com > wrote in message
news:2i******** ****@uni-berlin.de...
Is c.d.i destined to become a desolate wasteland of pointless
arguments and whingers pining for the good old days?

Did you answer your own question there ...?


Never let irony stand in the way of a good story.
Nov 12 '05 #186
>
Actually, a surprising number of companies have purchased Oracle for OS/390.
Oracle gave me 5 references in the Fortune top 25 companies in the US. I
checked all 5 out, and all 5 purchased it, but not one was using it for a
production system.


Oracle for OS/390 was more widely used 5-10 years ago when we saw a lot
of migration of applications from mainframes to open system platforms -
typically deployed as an aid to migration supporting parallel
testing/development etc. They tended to get "switched off" once the
migration was complete.

Some OS/390 customers also used Oracle on the mainframe as an "in
memory" gateway to their DB2 data for their downstream systems etc. In
some situations the performance of Oracle (Unix) <-> Oracle (OS/390) <->
TG4DB2 (OS/390) <-> DB2 could be better configured than Oracle (Unix)
<-> TG4DB2 (OS/390) <-> DB2 (OS/390) (better control of the join
shipping, for one).

So it's entirely possible that companies have simply stopped using
Oracle OS/390, or only use it as an aid to striping data from the MF
environment. Let me know who the references were and I'll make sure we
stop giving them out.

Nov 12 '05 #187
> The OS/390 (MVS or whatever) COBOL compiler you might
have used with Oracle on OS/390 is not compatible with any Windows, Linux,
or UNIX COBOL compiler (assuming you even wanted to use COBOL on those
platforms).


I seem to remember (from faded memory) that Microfocus had a compiler
that was (reasonably) compatible. Or was that just to the OS/2 ? I know
we moved a swag of Cobol FinServs apps onto HP a decade ago without
significant rewrite. Is microfocs even around anymore - CA-Microfocus ?

Nov 12 '05 #188
> > The OS/390 (MVS or whatever) COBOL compiler you might
have used with Oracle on OS/390 is not compatible with any Windows, Linux, or UNIX COBOL compiler (assuming you even wanted to use COBOL on those
platforms).

"Mark Townsend" <ma***********@ comcast.net> wrote in message
news:HIbyc.2608 1$HG.7386@attbi _s53... I seem to remember (from faded memory) that Microfocus had a compiler
that was (reasonably) compatible. Or was that just to the OS/2 ? I know
we moved a swag of Cobol FinServs apps onto HP a decade ago without
significant rewrite. Is microfocs even around anymore - CA-Microfocus ?


Yes MicroFocus is still around, and it was reasonably compatible. But Danny
boy only allows 100% compatibility for DB2, so applying the same standard,
MicroFocus was not 100% compatible with mainframe COBOL.
Nov 12 '05 #189
Madison Pruet allegedly said,on my timestamp of 11/06/2004 1:09 PM:
Then we can all get back to postings about things of import such as
Pink Floyd vs. Bach.

I'm a Mozart fan myself... ;-)


and brother Ray Charles passed away today.
A minute of silence, boys and girls.
The world is now a smaller place, as far as I'm concerned...
:(

--
Cheers
Nuno Souto
wi*******@yahoo .com.au.nospam
Nov 12 '05 #190

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