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database market share 2003

http://biz.yahoo.com/rc/040526/tech_...etshare_1.html

Interesting to see that database sales for windows is more than
Unix.
Nov 12 '05
346 16701
It's hard to believe you'd be seriously asking this question. I can
guarantee you that something you did within the past week (if not
multiple things) touched an OS/390 or Z/os application. Banking, credit
card, airline or car rental reservations system, the list goes on and on.

Larry Edelstein

Data Goob wrote:
"Mark A" <ma@switchboard .net> wrote in message news:ie******** ********@news.u swest.net...
"Data Goob" <da******@hotma il.com> wrote in message
news:S7****** ***********@fe4 2.usenetserver. com...
You guys got me thinking, what would I find on IBM's web site
about OS/390? Got my curiousity going, and so I went over to
IBM and did a search for OS/390. What did I find?

"IBM announces the end of service for OS/390 2.10, the last
release of OS/390, will be September 30, 2004. Customers on OS/390
2.10 should be making plans to complete their migrations to z/OS
1.4 by this date. IBM also announces the end of service for z/OS
1.2 will be October 31, 2004, and the end of service for z/OS 1.3
will be March 31, 2005, as planned. The end of service for z/OS 1.4
will be extended to March 31, 2007. This date is the same as the
end of service date planned for z/OS 1.5. "

Does Informix run on OS/390?

I would think this a match made in heaven...

:-)


Support service for OS/390 is being discontinued and is replaced by z/OS. It
is basically the same thing as OS/390, but with enhanced ability to perform
as a server to web clients.


OMG. Are you human? Just kidding! Seriously, is there something about
this platform that is compelling enough to consider it instead of doing things
on Linux or UNIX? Is z/OS a growth market or just something gradually
disappearing?


Nov 12 '05 #91
"Mark A" <ma@switchboard .net> wrote in message news:or******** ********@news.u swest.net...

The operating system and much of the system software on it is much more
stable than Linux or UNIX, which is why many large enterprises rely on it
for critical applications like banking, reservations, and other critical
applications. Actually the IBM mainframe boxes themselves run Linux or z/OS.
When did this occur? I thought mainframes ran VM.
I don't think it is a growth market, nor is it disappearing. The mainframe
prices keep decreasing, and UNIX boxes get more sophisticated and more
expensive. So eventually it will probably just come down to which operating
system you want to use.
Hmmm. Interesting.
People get too hung-up on the past, and on the names of things. An IBM
mainframe is just a box, that runs an operating system, and can run local
application or with remote clients (including web clients). Things change.

( runs around to catch him leaving and makes him stop )

Isn't VM considered one of the best OS's out there? Isn't that the OS
on OS/390, or is it another name--guess I'm too much away from mainframe
systems?

But imagine this for a moment, Dieing database product hooks up with
dieing hardware platform. I mean seriously, it would be interesting to see
Informix and z/OS come together in an Open Source project of some kind.
Like start out with just putting Informix SE on z/OS. WTF they're both
dying animals, give it a shot.

Nov 12 '05 #92
> "Mark A" <ma@switchboard .net> wrote in message
news:or******** ********@news.u swest.net...

The operating system and much of the system software on it is much more
stable than Linux or UNIX, which is why many large enterprises rely on it for critical applications like banking, reservations, and other critical
applications. Actually the IBM mainframe boxes themselves run Linux or z/OS.

When did this occur? I thought mainframes ran VM.
I don't think it is a growth market, nor is it disappearing. The mainframe prices keep decreasing, and UNIX boxes get more sophisticated and more
expensive. So eventually it will probably just come down to which operating system you want to use.

Hmmm. Interesting.
People get too hung-up on the past, and on the names of things. An IBM
mainframe is just a box, that runs an operating system, and can run local application or with remote clients (including web clients). Things change.

( runs around to catch him leaving and makes him stop )

Isn't VM considered one of the best OS's out there? Isn't that the OS
on OS/390, or is it another name--guess I'm too much away from mainframe
systems?

But imagine this for a moment, Dieing database product hooks up with
dieing hardware platform. I mean seriously, it would be interesting to see
Informix and z/OS come together in an Open Source project of some kind.
Like start out with just putting Informix SE on z/OS. WTF they're both
dying animals, give it a shot.

OS/390 (previously known as MVS) is the operations system, not the hardware.
I don't know what they call the boxes these days (which also run Linux).

Yes the mainframe boxes do also run VM, but usually not for critical
applications. VM (virtual machine) was originally created as operating
system that could logically partition a box and run multiple different
operating systems underneath it for testing purposes. Somehow it began to be
used for certain interactive applications, but is not considered to be
anywhere near the equal of MVS or OS/390.

VSE is another old operating system that may still be around (I am not sure)
that runs on mainframes. It was used by many small companies who did need
the sophistication of MVS/OS390.

Some airline reservation systems still run TPF operating system that was
specifically designed for extremely high volume transactions. I am sure it
being phased out, because it very expensive to find people to maintain the
applications, which are written in assembler code and a proprietary built-in
database product.

At one time IBM was selling PC's that ran MVS/OS390 for software developers.
It is perfectly conceivable that it could happen again.
Nov 12 '05 #93
Why would my question not be serious?

I find the whole IBM landscape somewhat comical yet
daunting. Lots of achievement and lots of angst
over appearing too proud. On the flip side there
is Oracle, with a lot of strutting around like a
peacock, with totally undeserving value run by a
pompous self-absorbed self-serving megalomaniac
full of arrogance. But I'm getting redundant, and
digress. There is a whole generation of computer
users who will never see a mainframe, AS/400, OS/390,
etc. etc. The fact that they won't know the value
of old, big iron systems doesn't make them bad, it
just means that a whole new generation of IT
professionals are going to solve business problems
outside the mainframe space, and would never even
begin to consider them, instead trying to make Linux
and Windows work faster and more efficiently. I'm
simply asking questions about mainframes because I
simply don't have a clue about that market, and find
it curious that those that do, think that counting DB2
on AS/400 is irrelevant or lies when it is clear that
they really don't know jack about the DB2 market.
Anyway, I remain curious about some kind of hidden
value in the mainframe space that cannot be found in
the Linux or Windows space. Enlighten me.
"Larry" <La***@nospam.n et> wrote in message news:dy******** *********@news4 .srv.hcvlny.cv. net...
It's hard to believe you'd be seriously asking this question. I can
guarantee you that something you did within the past week (if not
multiple things) touched an OS/390 or Z/os application. Banking, credit
card, airline or car rental reservations system, the list goes on and on.

Larry Edelstein

Data Goob wrote:
"Mark A" <ma@switchboard .net> wrote in message news:ie******** ********@news.u swest.net...
"Data Goob" <da******@hotma il.com> wrote in message
news:S7****** ***********@fe4 2.usenetserver. com...

You guys got me thinking, what would I find on IBM's web site
about OS/390? Got my curiousity going, and so I went over to
IBM and did a search for OS/390. What did I find?

"IBM announces the end of service for OS/390 2.10, the last
release of OS/390, will be September 30, 2004. Customers on OS/390
2.10 should be making plans to complete their migrations to z/OS
1.4 by this date. IBM also announces the end of service for z/OS
1.2 will be October 31, 2004, and the end of service for z/OS 1.3
will be March 31, 2005, as planned. The end of service for z/OS 1.4
will be extended to March 31, 2007. This date is the same as the
end of service date planned for z/OS 1.5. "

Does Informix run on OS/390?

I would think this a match made in heaven...

:-)

Support service for OS/390 is being discontinued and is replaced by z/OS. It
is basically the same thing as OS/390, but with enhanced ability to perform
as a server to web clients.


OMG. Are you human? Just kidding! Seriously, is there something about
this platform that is compelling enough to consider it instead of doing things
on Linux or UNIX? Is z/OS a growth market or just something gradually
disappearing?


Nov 12 '05 #94

"Data Goob" <da******@hotma il.com> wrote in message
news:BV******** ********@fe41.u senetserver.com ...
Why would my question not be serious?

I find the whole IBM landscape somewhat comical yet
daunting. Lots of achievement and lots of angst
over appearing too proud. On the flip side there
is Oracle, with a lot of strutting around like a
peacock, with totally undeserving value run by a
pompous self-absorbed self-serving megalomaniac
full of arrogance. But I'm getting redundant, and
digress. There is a whole generation of computer
users who will never see a mainframe, AS/400, OS/390,
etc. etc. The fact that they won't know the value
of old, big iron systems doesn't make them bad, it
just means that a whole new generation of IT
professionals are going to solve business problems
outside the mainframe space, and would never even
begin to consider them, instead trying to make Linux
and Windows work faster and more efficiently. I'm
simply asking questions about mainframes because I
simply don't have a clue about that market, and find
it curious that those that do, think that counting DB2
on AS/400 is irrelevant or lies when it is clear that
they really don't know jack about the DB2 market.
Anyway, I remain curious about some kind of hidden
value in the mainframe space that cannot be found in
the Linux or Windows space. Enlighten me.

Obviously UNIX, Linux, and Windows server technology, including the
databases that run on them, have come a long way in a short time.

I think that one reason most IT people will never develop on a mainframe is
that you can't run it your PC at home. Also, the scope of IT has increased
exponentially, so even if mainframes remain stable in terms of workload, the
rest of IT is growing extremely fast.

But I think most people would be amazed at how close they really are to
mainframes in their everyday life. Telephone, gas, electric, oil companies,
banks, brokerage houses, airlines, governments, etc. They are more pervasive
than you would realize in your own life, albeit as a consumer.

Whether mainframes survive is partially going to be whether they become
price competitive with UNIX boxes. People are starting to realize that it
takes a lot of personnel to maintain lots of small UNIX survivors in an
enterprise. UNIX servers are becoming more larger and more consolidated,
more like mainframes. Is a $5 million UNIX cluster a mainframe? Why not?
Nov 12 '05 #95
People are starting to realize that it
takes a lot of personnel to maintain lots of small UNIX survivors in an
enterprise. UNIX servers are becoming more larger and more consolidated,
more like mainframes.
So by a zSeries, put Linux on it and put IDS on top of that!

Works like a dream!!
I think that one reason most IT people will never develop on a mainframe is
that you can't run it your PC at home.
But as everyone gets ADSL, and can "tunnel" into their companies
internal network from the house, people can use their PC at home as if
it was on their desk in the office. So again this perhaps start to
change. I now have a PDA running a web browser, which has a desk top
on it, and all my files are stored in my Informix database. Can access
them all on my PC at work, at home, or on my PDA if I am "on the
road". Not that far off Larry's thin client vision, except its a PDA
and and Informix database, not a net computer and "O"

"Mark A" <ma@switchboard .net> wrote in message news:<F4******* *********@news. uswest.net>... "Data Goob" <da******@hotma il.com> wrote in message
news:BV******** ********@fe41.u senetserver.com ...
Why would my question not be serious?

I find the whole IBM landscape somewhat comical yet
daunting. Lots of achievement and lots of angst
over appearing too proud. On the flip side there
is Oracle, with a lot of strutting around like a
peacock, with totally undeserving value run by a
pompous self-absorbed self-serving megalomaniac
full of arrogance. But I'm getting redundant, and
digress. There is a whole generation of computer
users who will never see a mainframe, AS/400, OS/390,
etc. etc. The fact that they won't know the value
of old, big iron systems doesn't make them bad, it
just means that a whole new generation of IT
professionals are going to solve business problems
outside the mainframe space, and would never even
begin to consider them, instead trying to make Linux
and Windows work faster and more efficiently. I'm
simply asking questions about mainframes because I
simply don't have a clue about that market, and find
it curious that those that do, think that counting DB2
on AS/400 is irrelevant or lies when it is clear that
they really don't know jack about the DB2 market.
Anyway, I remain curious about some kind of hidden
value in the mainframe space that cannot be found in
the Linux or Windows space. Enlighten me.

Obviously UNIX, Linux, and Windows server technology, including the
databases that run on them, have come a long way in a short time.

I think that one reason most IT people will never develop on a mainframe is
that you can't run it your PC at home. Also, the scope of IT has increased
exponentially, so even if mainframes remain stable in terms of workload, the
rest of IT is growing extremely fast.

But I think most people would be amazed at how close they really are to
mainframes in their everyday life. Telephone, gas, electric, oil companies,
banks, brokerage houses, airlines, governments, etc. They are more pervasive
than you would realize in your own life, albeit as a consumer.

Whether mainframes survive is partially going to be whether they become
price competitive with UNIX boxes. People are starting to realize that it
takes a lot of personnel to maintain lots of small UNIX survivors in an
enterprise. UNIX servers are becoming more larger and more consolidated,
more like mainframes. Is a $5 million UNIX cluster a mainframe? Why not?

Nov 12 '05 #96
"scottishpo et" <dr*******@yaho o.com> wrote in message
news:81******** *************** ***@posting.goo gle.com...
But as everyone gets ADSL, and can "tunnel" into their companies
internal network from the house, people can use their PC at home as if
it was on their desk in the office. So again this perhaps start to
change. I now have a PDA running a web browser, which has a desk top
on it, and all my files are stored in my Informix database. Can access
them all on my PC at work, at home ...


You don't have NTL at home then?!
Nov 12 '05 #97
Basically ... one places an application on the mainframe (vs. on
Intel/AMD/UNIX) when one needs the bullet-proof reliability,
availability, security, and performance that the mainframe has had the
time to attain as it is the most mature of all the platforms. There are
companies like BMC and CA that have made billions of dollars developing
and selling tools for monitoring and administering the mainframe
environment. Every day, something you do touches a mainframe. Most
banks, brokerage firms, airlines, car rental agencies, etc. use
mainframes for their critical applications.

While the Intel/AMD/UNIX platforms have made tremendous strides over the
years, they just do not yet approach what the mainframe can offer in the
above areas. Yes, they are more expensive to manage and administer. But
that cost is justified by the "protection " that they offer, or else
customers wouldn't pay it.

Larry Edelstein

Data Goob wrote:
Why would my question not be serious?

I find the whole IBM landscape somewhat comical yet
daunting. Lots of achievement and lots of angst
over appearing too proud. On the flip side there
is Oracle, with a lot of strutting around like a
peacock, with totally undeserving value run by a
pompous self-absorbed self-serving megalomaniac
full of arrogance. But I'm getting redundant, and
digress. There is a whole generation of computer
users who will never see a mainframe, AS/400, OS/390,
etc. etc. The fact that they won't know the value
of old, big iron systems doesn't make them bad, it
just means that a whole new generation of IT
professionals are going to solve business problems
outside the mainframe space, and would never even
begin to consider them, instead trying to make Linux
and Windows work faster and more efficiently. I'm
simply asking questions about mainframes because I
simply don't have a clue about that market, and find
it curious that those that do, think that counting DB2
on AS/400 is irrelevant or lies when it is clear that
they really don't know jack about the DB2 market.
Anyway, I remain curious about some kind of hidden
value in the mainframe space that cannot be found in
the Linux or Windows space. Enlighten me.
"Larry" <La***@nospam.n et> wrote in message news:dy******** *********@news4 .srv.hcvlny.cv. net...
It's hard to believe you'd be seriously asking this question. I can
guarantee you that something you did within the past week (if not
multiple things) touched an OS/390 or Z/os application. Banking, credit
card, airline or car rental reservations system, the list goes on and on.

Larry Edelstein

Data Goob wrote:
"Mark A" <ma@switchboard .net> wrote in message news:ie******** ********@news.u swest.net...
"Data Goob" <da******@hotma il.com> wrote in message
news:S7**** *************@f e42.usenetserve r.com...
>You guys got me thinking, what would I find on IBM's web site
>about OS/390? Got my curiousity going, and so I went over to
>IBM and did a search for OS/390. What did I find?
>
>"IBM announces the end of service for OS/390 2.10, the last
>release of OS/390, will be September 30, 2004. Customers on OS/390
>2.10 should be making plans to complete their migrations to z/OS
>1.4 by this date. IBM also announces the end of service for z/OS
>1.2 will be October 31, 2004, and the end of service for z/OS 1.3
>will be March 31, 2005, as planned. The end of service for z/OS 1.4
>will be extended to March 31, 2007. This date is the same as the
>end of service date planned for z/OS 1.5. "
>
>Does Informix run on OS/390?
>
>I would think this a match made in heaven...
>
>:-)

Support service for OS/390 is being discontinued and is replaced by z/OS. It
is basically the same thing as OS/390, but with enhanced ability to perform
as a server to web clients.

OMG. Are you human? Just kidding! Seriously, is there something about
this platform that is compelling enough to consider it instead of doing things
on Linux or UNIX? Is z/OS a growth market or just something gradually
disappearing ?



Nov 12 '05 #98
What's the price for a zSeries z990?

I've been perusing the z990 webpages over at ibm.com
but no prices. It's intriguing to see mainframes in
vogue running Linux, but no context of how fast these
things are and how much they cost to implement. The
jargon is also completely opaque unless you grew up
in a mainframe environment, which I did not.

"Larry" <La***@nospam.n et> wrote in message news:SB******** ************@ne ws4.srv.hcvlny. cv.net...
Basically ... one places an application on the mainframe (vs. on
Intel/AMD/UNIX) when one needs the bullet-proof reliability,
availability, security, and performance that the mainframe has had the
time to attain as it is the most mature of all the platforms. There are
companies like BMC and CA that have made billions of dollars developing
and selling tools for monitoring and administering the mainframe
environment. Every day, something you do touches a mainframe. Most
banks, brokerage firms, airlines, car rental agencies, etc. use
mainframes for their critical applications.

While the Intel/AMD/UNIX platforms have made tremendous strides over the
years, they just do not yet approach what the mainframe can offer in the
above areas. Yes, they are more expensive to manage and administer. But
that cost is justified by the "protection " that they offer, or else
customers wouldn't pay it.

Larry Edelstein

Data Goob wrote:
Why would my question not be serious?

I find the whole IBM landscape somewhat comical yet
daunting. Lots of achievement and lots of angst
over appearing too proud. On the flip side there
is Oracle, with a lot of strutting around like a
peacock, with totally undeserving value run by a
pompous self-absorbed self-serving megalomaniac
full of arrogance. But I'm getting redundant, and
digress. There is a whole generation of computer
users who will never see a mainframe, AS/400, OS/390,
etc. etc. The fact that they won't know the value
of old, big iron systems doesn't make them bad, it
just means that a whole new generation of IT
professionals are going to solve business problems
outside the mainframe space, and would never even
begin to consider them, instead trying to make Linux
and Windows work faster and more efficiently. I'm
simply asking questions about mainframes because I
simply don't have a clue about that market, and find
it curious that those that do, think that counting DB2
on AS/400 is irrelevant or lies when it is clear that
they really don't know jack about the DB2 market.
Anyway, I remain curious about some kind of hidden
value in the mainframe space that cannot be found in
the Linux or Windows space. Enlighten me.
"Larry" <La***@nospam.n et> wrote in message news:dy******** *********@news4 .srv.hcvlny.cv. net...
It's hard to believe you'd be seriously asking this question. I can
guarantee you that something you did within the past week (if not
multiple things) touched an OS/390 or Z/os application. Banking, credit
card, airline or car rental reservations system, the list goes on and on.

Larry Edelstein

Data Goob wrote:

"Mark A" <ma@switchboard .net> wrote in message news:ie******** ********@news.u swest.net...
>"Data Goob" <da******@hotma il.com> wrote in message
>news:S7**** *************@f e42.usenetserve r.com...
>
>
>>You guys got me thinking, what would I find on IBM's web site
>>about OS/390? Got my curiousity going, and so I went over to
>>IBM and did a search for OS/390. What did I find?
>>
>>"IBM announces the end of service for OS/390 2.10, the last
>>release of OS/390, will be September 30, 2004. Customers on OS/390
>>2.10 should be making plans to complete their migrations to z/OS
>>1.4 by this date. IBM also announces the end of service for z/OS
>>1.2 will be October 31, 2004, and the end of service for z/OS 1.3
>>will be March 31, 2005, as planned. The end of service for z/OS 1.4
>>will be extended to March 31, 2007. This date is the same as the
>>end of service date planned for z/OS 1.5. "
>>
>>Does Informix run on OS/390?
>>
>>I would think this a match made in heaven...
>>
>>:-)
>
>Support service for OS/390 is being discontinued and is replaced by z/OS. It
>is basically the same thing as OS/390, but with enhanced ability to perform
>as a server to web clients.
>
>

OMG. Are you human? Just kidding! Seriously, is there something about
this platform that is compelling enough to consider it instead of doing things
on Linux or UNIX? Is z/OS a growth market or just something gradually
disappearing ?




Nov 12 '05 #99
Honestly? I don't know. They have become less and less expensive ...
especially the entry-level models. Remember though what your paying for.
Yes for certain apps, one only needs the RAS profile of the
Intel/AMD/UNIX environment. We have many of those, as does Sun, HP,
Oracle, Sybase, etc. But the mainframe offers other things, and that's
what you pay for.

Anybody else know?

Larry Edelstein

Data Goob wrote:
What's the price for a zSeries z990?

I've been perusing the z990 webpages over at ibm.com
but no prices. It's intriguing to see mainframes in
vogue running Linux, but no context of how fast these
things are and how much they cost to implement. The
jargon is also completely opaque unless you grew up
in a mainframe environment, which I did not.

"Larry" <La***@nospam.n et> wrote in message news:SB******** ************@ne ws4.srv.hcvlny. cv.net...
Basically ... one places an application on the mainframe (vs. on
Intel/AMD/UNIX) when one needs the bullet-proof reliability,
availabilit y, security, and performance that the mainframe has had the
time to attain as it is the most mature of all the platforms. There are
companies like BMC and CA that have made billions of dollars developing
and selling tools for monitoring and administering the mainframe
environment . Every day, something you do touches a mainframe. Most
banks, brokerage firms, airlines, car rental agencies, etc. use
mainframes for their critical applications.

While the Intel/AMD/UNIX platforms have made tremendous strides over the
years, they just do not yet approach what the mainframe can offer in the
above areas. Yes, they are more expensive to manage and administer. But
that cost is justified by the "protection " that they offer, or else
customers wouldn't pay it.

Larry Edelstein

Data Goob wrote:
Why would my question not be serious?

I find the whole IBM landscape somewhat comical yet
daunting. Lots of achievement and lots of angst
over appearing too proud. On the flip side there
is Oracle, with a lot of strutting around like a
peacock, with totally undeserving value run by a
pompous self-absorbed self-serving megalomaniac
full of arrogance. But I'm getting redundant, and
digress. There is a whole generation of computer
users who will never see a mainframe, AS/400, OS/390,
etc. etc. The fact that they won't know the value
of old, big iron systems doesn't make them bad, it
just means that a whole new generation of IT
professional s are going to solve business problems
outside the mainframe space, and would never even
begin to consider them, instead trying to make Linux
and Windows work faster and more efficiently. I'm
simply asking questions about mainframes because I
simply don't have a clue about that market, and find
it curious that those that do, think that counting DB2
on AS/400 is irrelevant or lies when it is clear that
they really don't know jack about the DB2 market.
Anyway, I remain curious about some kind of hidden
value in the mainframe space that cannot be found in
the Linux or Windows space. Enlighten me.
"Larry" <La***@nospam.n et> wrote in message news:dy******** *********@news4 .srv.hcvlny.cv. net...
It's hard to believe you'd be seriously asking this question. I can
guarantee you that something you did within the past week (if not
multiple things) touched an OS/390 or Z/os application. Banking, credit
card, airline or car rental reservations system, the list goes on and on.

Larry Edelstein

Data Goob wrote:
>"Mark A" <ma@switchboard .net> wrote in message news:ie******** ********@news.u swest.net...
>
>
>
>>"Data Goob" <da******@hotma il.com> wrote in message
>>news:S7** *************** @fe42.usenetser ver.com...
>>
>>
>>
>>>You guys got me thinking, what would I find on IBM's web site
>>>about OS/390? Got my curiousity going, and so I went over to
>>>IBM and did a search for OS/390. What did I find?
>>>
>>>"IBM announces the end of service for OS/390 2.10, the last
>>>releas e of OS/390, will be September 30, 2004. Customers on OS/390
>>>2.10 should be making plans to complete their migrations to z/OS
>>>1.4 by this date. IBM also announces the end of service for z/OS
>>>1.2 will be October 31, 2004, and the end of service for z/OS 1.3
>>>will be March 31, 2005, as planned. The end of service for z/OS 1.4
>>>will be extended to March 31, 2007. This date is the same as the
>>>end of service date planned for z/OS 1.5. "
>>>
>>>Does Informix run on OS/390?
>>>
>>>I would think this a match made in heaven...
>>>
>>>:-)
>>
>>Support service for OS/390 is being discontinued and is replaced by z/OS. It
>>is basically the same thing as OS/390, but with enhanced ability to perform
>>as a server to web clients.
>>
>>
>
>OMG. Are you human? Just kidding! Seriously, is there something about
>this platform that is compelling enough to consider it instead of doing things
>on Linux or UNIX? Is z/OS a growth market or just something gradually
>disappeari ng?
>
>
>
>



Nov 12 '05 #100

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http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1820667,00.asp The database market grew by 10.3 percent in 2004, fueled largely by hunger for business intelligence and analytics, according to numbers released by the Gartner Group on Monday. With 34.1 percent of the overall market, IBM holds a slim margin over its closest competitor, Oracle Corp., which maintains 33.7 percent of the overall market. Microsoft Corp. follows up with 20 percent of...
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In today's digital age, having a compelling online presence is paramount for businesses aiming to thrive in a competitive landscape. At the heart of this digital strategy lies an intricately woven tapestry of website design and digital marketing. It's not merely about having a website; it's about crafting an immersive digital experience that captivates audiences and drives business growth. The Art of Business Website Design Your website is...
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Overview: Windows 11 and 10 have less user interface control over operating system update behaviour than previous versions of Windows. In Windows 11 and 10, there is no way to turn off the Windows Update option using the Control Panel or Settings app; it automatically checks for updates and installs any it finds, whether you like it or not. For most users, this new feature is actually very convenient. If you want to control the update process,...
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Let's talk about the concept of autonomous AI software engineers and no-code agents. These AIs are designed to manage the entire lifecycle of a software development project—planning, coding, testing, and deployment—without human intervention. Imagine an AI that can take a project description, break it down, write the code, debug it, and then launch it, all on its own.... Now, this would greatly impact the work of software developers. The idea...
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isladogs
by: isladogs | last post by:
The next Access Europe User Group meeting will be on Wednesday 1 May 2024 starting at 18:00 UK time (6PM UTC+1) and finishing by 19:30 (7.30PM). In this session, we are pleased to welcome a new presenter, Adolph Dupré who will be discussing some powerful techniques for using class modules. He will explain when you may want to use classes instead of User Defined Types (UDT). For example, to manage the data in unbound forms. Adolph will...
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by: conductexam | last post by:
I have .net C# application in which I am extracting data from word file and save it in database particularly. To store word all data as it is I am converting the whole word file firstly in HTML and then checking html paragraph one by one. At the time of converting from word file to html my equations which are in the word document file was convert into image. Globals.ThisAddIn.Application.ActiveDocument.Select();...
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by: TSSRALBI | last post by:
Hello I'm a network technician in training and I need your help. I am currently learning how to create and manage the different types of VPNs and I have a question about LAN-to-LAN VPNs. The last exercise I practiced was to create a LAN-to-LAN VPN between two Pfsense firewalls, by using IPSEC protocols. I succeeded, with both firewalls in the same network. But I'm wondering if it's possible to do the same thing, with 2 Pfsense firewalls...
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Hai team i want code for transfer the data from one system to another through IP address by using C# our system has to for every 5mins then we have to update the data what the data is updated we have to send another system
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How can i add a mobile payment intergratation into php mysql website.
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In today's digital era, a well-designed website is crucial for businesses looking to succeed. Whether you're a small business owner or a large corporation in Toronto, having a strong online presence can significantly impact your brand's success. BSMN Consultancy, a leader in Website Development in Toronto offers valuable insights into creating effective websites that not only look great but also perform exceptionally well. In this comprehensive...

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