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books for beginners c++ suggestions?

Gregor McAlen
P: 26
Recently I started to study c++ on my own and purchased a book c++ for dummies 5th edition.

Currently I had read half the book and now I have a better understanding of the language but also I was left with lots of unanswered questions.

Most of the examples use a code with no explanation and some of those examples really don't make any sense.

Just wanted to consult with forum members who also studied c++ from the beginning by them self. What books did you find the easiest to understand (clear examples,logical) or what other learning materials did you use?

Thank you in advance.
Gregor McAlen
Nov 16 '08 #1
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7 Replies


Expert 100+
P: 671
What books did you find the easiest to understand (clear examples,logical) or what other learning materials did you use?
There's a shortlist of books that are reliable and worth reading (or required reading). I consider Accelerated C++ to be one of them, and C++ Primer (by Lippman) to be the other. These two books are the starting points for a beginner.

Note that I don't consider C++ a suitable language for a complete beginner to programming. The two books I mentioned above are invaluable, but they may be a bit too advanced for you if you have never programmed before. Neither book holds your hand.
Nov 17 '08 #2

weaknessforcats
Expert Mod 5K+
P: 9,197
Almost certainly you will need to take C++ classes. In my case, I took 4 quarters of C followed by 4 quarters of C++.

That and reading a ka-jillion books got me to understand C++.

Learning C++ is more like learing a foreigh language. Books don't help that much. You jabe to talk woth native speakers. In the case of C++ you have to talk with C++ speakers. And that means classes at first and jobs later.

I started when I was 50 and by 54 was beginning to teach C++.
Nov 17 '08 #3

Gregor McAlen
P: 26
Almost certainly you will need to take C++ classes. In my case, I took 4 quarters of C followed by 4 quarters of C++.

That and reading a ka-jillion books got me to understand C++.

Learning C++ is more like learing a foreigh language. Books don't help that much. You jabe to talk woth native speakers. In the case of C++ you have to talk with C++ speakers. And that means classes at first and jobs later.

I started when I was 50 and by 54 was beginning to teach C++.
I understand that classes are much faster and preferred, but unfortunatly I'ts impossible in my situation for a few reasons that not worth mentioning.

It leaves me with only books, internet resources, and forums. Just trying to get the most out of those options.
Nov 17 '08 #4

Expert 10K+
P: 11,448
You could bite the bullet and read "the C++ Programming Language 3rd ed"
by Bjarne Stroustrup. He's the one who invented that moloch of a language,
It'll take about a year to read that book from cover to cover but when you've
understood what's all inside that book you've understood most of that language.

There's an old Dutch saying: "careful doctors make stinking wounds". Bjarne
is a tough doctor.

kind regards,

Jos
Nov 17 '08 #5

Gregor McAlen
P: 26
You could bite the bullet and read "the C++ Programming Language 3rd ed"
by Bjarne Stroustrup. He's the one who invented that moloch of a language,
It'll take about a year to read that book from cover to cover but when you've
understood what's all inside that book you've understood most of that language.

There's an old Dutch saying: "careful doctors make stinking wounds". Bjarne
is a tough doctor.

kind regards,

Jos
Thanks ill check his book in the store. Currently I'm a bit over half the book of c++ for dummies 5th edition... but I don't like this one too much (illogical and badly explained examples) :(

I believe there is hope with Bjarne, since he invented portion of the language he must have iron logic and it sound promising to me. thanks again for the tip.
Nov 18 '08 #6

Expert 100+
P: 671
I don't think Stroustrup's TC++PL book is a great idea for a new person to the language. The structure of the book and the way content is introduced is more suitable for someone who already has a good idea of the language. Certainly, Stroustrup himself thinks it's worth writing another book more suited for a beginner. It's not out yet, but if you look at the table of contents, you can see what I'm getting at.
Nov 18 '08 #7

Gregor McAlen
P: 26
I don't think Stroustrup's TC++PL book is a great idea for a new person to the language. The structure of the book and the way content is introduced is more suitable for someone who already has a good idea of the language. Certainly, Stroustrup himself thinks it's worth writing another book more suited for a beginner. It's not out yet, but if you look at the table of contents, you can see what I'm getting at.
Maybe there is a book with better-clearer explanation of coding examples (for dummies examples use a lot of code which were never explained, even tho they say its for non-programmers book)

Will appreciate any advice since there is so many books, but not too many good review so getting a book is like buying a cat in a bag.

p.s. "Programming -- Principles and Practice Using C++" seems that ill be hunting for this book as well, when it hit the shelves .
Nov 18 '08 #8

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