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c++ Newton-Raphson problem

P: n/a
Let double NR( double x, double(*)(const double&) f ) be the
signature of a Newton-Raphson function NR.

Here, f is a function which returns a double and accepts a const
double&. The aim of the game is to find a zero of this function f
(the point at which f crosses the x-axis). This zero-of-f which
solves our problem is the double which NR returns. It remains to
explain what the "double x" represents. This is the starting-guess
that is required in Newton-Raphson implementations.

In my case, I have the following amended Newton-Raphson situation. I
have a function of the form

double MyFunc(double x1, double x2, double x3, double x4, double x5)

I want to solve the following problem: Fix x1, x2, x3, and x4. Then
use Newton Raphson to return the double y such that MyFunc(x1, x2, x3,
x4, y) = 0.

I was unable to find a way of using the ready-made function NR because
it assumes f accepts 1 double and returns 1 double, whereas My Func
accepts 5 doubles and returns 1 double.

My very-inelegant solution was to copy-paste the NR code and adapt it
so that the pointer-to-function parameter was of the type I needed.

Is there a more elegant approach that calls on the NR function already
present?

Thank for your help.

Paul Epstein
Nov 15 '08 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
pa**********@att.net wrote:
Let double NR( double x, double(*)(const double&) f ) be the
signature of a Newton-Raphson function NR.

Here, f is a function which returns a double and accepts a const
double&. The aim of the game is to find a zero of this function f
(the point at which f crosses the x-axis). This zero-of-f which
solves our problem is the double which NR returns. It remains to
explain what the "double x" represents. This is the starting-guess
that is required in Newton-Raphson implementations.

In my case, I have the following amended Newton-Raphson situation. I
have a function of the form

double MyFunc(double x1, double x2, double x3, double x4, double x5)

I want to solve the following problem: Fix x1, x2, x3, and x4. Then
use Newton Raphson to return the double y such that MyFunc(x1, x2, x3,
x4, y) = 0.

I was unable to find a way of using the ready-made function NR because
it assumes f accepts 1 double and returns 1 double, whereas My Func
accepts 5 doubles and returns 1 double.

My very-inelegant solution was to copy-paste the NR code and adapt it
so that the pointer-to-function parameter was of the type I needed.

Is there a more elegant approach that calls on the NR function already
present?
I would change NR into a template:

template < typename Float, typename Func >
Float find_zero ( Float initial_guess, Func f );

Then, you could use bind() from c++0x or Boost to fix the first four
arguments and pass the resulting function object into the template.
Best

Kai-Uwe Bux
Nov 15 '08 #2

P: n/a
On Nov 15, 9:53*am, pauldepst...@att.net wrote:
Let double NR( double x, double(*)(const double&) f ) *be the
signature of a Newton-Raphson function NR.
Here, f is a function which returns a double and accepts a
const double&. The aim of the game is to find a zero of
this function f (the point at which f crosses the x-axis).
This zero-of-f which solves our problem is the double which NR
returns. It remains to explain what the *"double x"
represents. This is the starting-guess that is required in
Newton-Raphson implementations.
In my case, I have the following amended Newton-Raphson
situation. *I have a function of the form
double MyFunc(double x1, double x2, double x3, double x4, double x5)
I want to solve the following problem: *Fix x1, x2, x3, and
x4. *Then use Newton Raphson to return the double y such that
MyFunc(x1, x2, x3, x4, y) = 0.
I was unable to find a way of using the ready-made function NR
because it assumes f accepts 1 double and returns 1 double,
whereas My Func accepts 5 doubles and returns 1 double.
That's because the interface to the existing NR function is very
poorly designed. In C++, the "standard" solution for any
callback would be:

class NRCallBack
{
public:
virtual ~NRCallBack() {}
virtual double operator()( double ) const = 0 ;
} ;

So the signature of NR would be:

double NR( double x, NRCallBack const& f ) ;

Rather than providing a function, you then derive from
NRCallBack, and define the appropriate operator.

In your precise case, it's probably a bit wordy, because we
don't have lambda classes, and you'd have to do something like:

double
NRforMyFunc( double x1, double x2, double x3, double x4 )
{
class F : public NRCallBack
{
public:
NRCallBack( double x1, double x2, double x3, double x4 )
: x1( x1 )
, x2( x2 )
, x3( x3 )
, x4( x4 )
{
}
virtual double operator()( double x ) const
{
return MyFunc( x1, x2, x3, x4, x ) ;
}

private:
double x1 ;
double x2 ;
double x3 ;
double x4 ;
} ;
return NR( 0.0, F() ) ;
}

If (as may be the case), NR is in fact a C function, and must be
callable from C, the established convention is to pass an
additional void* with user data, i.e.:
double NR( double x, double (*f)( double, void* ), void* ) ;
Again, you have to write a wrapper function which takes the
additional, fixed values as a void*, move these values into an
array, and pass the address of the array to NR.
My very-inelegant solution was to copy-paste the NR code and
adapt it so that the pointer-to-function parameter was of the
type I needed.
You may end up having to do this, if it's interface is broken.
Is there a more elegant approach that calls on the NR function
already present?
Depending on the context of what you're doing, you may be able
to use static variables and a wrapper function. IMHO, it's
playing with fire, however, and you'd be better off rewriting
the function to use one of the above interfaces, depending on
whether it is pure C++, or it must be callable from C as well.

--
James Kanze (GABI Software) email:ja*********@gmail.com
Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
Nov 15 '08 #3

P: n/a
On Nov 15, 10:26*am, Kai-Uwe Bux <jkherci...@gmx.netwrote:
pauldepst...@att.net wrote:
Let double NR( double x, double(*)(const double&) f ) *be the
signature of a Newton-Raphson function NR.
Here, f is a function which returns a double and accepts a
const double&. * * *The aim of the game is to find a zero of
this function f (the point at which f crosses the x-axis).
*This zero-of-f which solves our problem is the double which
NR returns. * It remains to explain what the *"double x"
represents. * This is the starting-guess that is required in
Newton-Raphson implementations.
In my case, I have the following amended Newton-Raphson situation. *I
have a function of the form
double MyFunc(double x1, double x2, double x3, double x4, double x5)
I want to solve the following problem: *Fix x1, x2, x3, and x4. *Then
use Newton Raphson to return the double y such that MyFunc(x1, x2, x3,
x4, y) = 0.
I was unable to find a way of using the ready-made function NR because
it assumes f accepts 1 double and returns 1 double, whereas My Func
accepts 5 doubles and returns 1 double.
My very-inelegant solution was to copy-paste the NR code and adapt it
so that the pointer-to-function parameter was of the type I needed.
Is there a more elegant approach that calls on the NR function already
present?
I would change NR into a template:
* template < typename Float, typename Func >
* Float find_zero ( Float initial_guess, Func f );
Then, you could use bind() from c++0x or Boost to fix the
first four arguments and pass the resulting function object
into the template.
This is a very elegant solution for a few special cases, but it
results in an infection template; if the call to this function
is in a function which receives the callback function as an
argument, that function must be a template as well. And so on,
add infitum; depending on the use pattern, you can very quickly
end up with an unmanageable mess, where all of your functions
are templates. (This might be workable if your compiler
supports export, but not many do.)

--
James Kanze (GABI Software) email:ja*********@gmail.com
Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
Nov 15 '08 #4

P: n/a
James Kanze wrote:
On Nov 15, 10:26*am, Kai-Uwe Bux <jkherci...@gmx.netwrote:
>pauldepst...@att.net wrote:
Let double NR( double x, double(*)(const double&) f ) *be the
signature of a Newton-Raphson function NR.
Here, f is a function which returns a double and accepts a
const double&. * * *The aim of the game is to find a zero of
this function f (the point at which f crosses the x-axis).
This zero-of-f which solves our problem is the double which
NR returns. * It remains to explain what the *"double x"
represents. * This is the starting-guess that is required in
Newton-Raphson implementations.
In my case, I have the following amended Newton-Raphson situation. *I
have a function of the form
double MyFunc(double x1, double x2, double x3, double x4, double x5)
I want to solve the following problem: *Fix x1, x2, x3, and x4. *Then
use Newton Raphson to return the double y such that MyFunc(x1, x2, x3,
x4, y) = 0.
I was unable to find a way of using the ready-made function NR because
it assumes f accepts 1 double and returns 1 double, whereas My Func
accepts 5 doubles and returns 1 double.
My very-inelegant solution was to copy-paste the NR code and adapt it
so that the pointer-to-function parameter was of the type I needed.
Is there a more elegant approach that calls on the NR function already
present?
>I would change NR into a template:
>template < typename Float, typename Func >
Float find_zero ( Float initial_guess, Func f );
>Then, you could use bind() from c++0x or Boost to fix the
first four arguments and pass the resulting function object
into the template.

This is a very elegant solution for a few special cases, but it
results in an infection template; if the call to this function
is in a function which receives the callback function as an
argument, that function must be a template as well.
Huh? I admit that this sentence has too many "this" and "that" for me to get
references straight. So, I do not really understand what you mean. Anyway,
I also do not see any reason why this template could not be called from
ordinary functions:

template < typename Float, typename Func >
Float find_zero ( Float initial_guess, Func f ) {
return ( 1 );
}

double caller ( double x, double(*f)(double) ) {
return ( find_zero( x, f ) );
}

double id ( double x ) {
return (x);
}

#include <iostream>
#include <ostream>

int main ( void ) {
std::cout << caller( 1.0, &id ) << '\n';
}
(BTW: a Google search for "infection template" only yield medical stuff.)

And so on,
add infitum; depending on the use pattern, you can very quickly
end up with an unmanageable mess, where all of your functions
are templates. (This might be workable if your compiler
supports export, but not many do.)
I don't see that. Could you please elaborate?
Best

Kai-Uwe Bux
Nov 15 '08 #5

P: n/a
On Nov 15, 11:48*am, Kai-Uwe Bux <jkherci...@gmx.netwrote:
James Kanze wrote:
On Nov 15, 10:26*am, Kai-Uwe Bux <jkherci...@gmx.netwrote:
pauldepst...@att.net wrote:
Let double NR( double x, double(*)(const double&) f ) *be the
signature of a Newton-Raphson function NR.
Here, f is a function which returns a double and accepts
a const double&. * * *The aim of the game is to find a
zero of this function f (the point at which f crosses the
x-axis). This zero-of-f which solves our problem is the
double which NR returns. * It remains to explain what the
*"double x" represents. * This is the starting-guess that
is required in Newton-Raphson implementations.
In my case, I have the following amended Newton-Raphson
situation. *I have a function of the form
double MyFunc(double x1, double x2, double x3, double x4, double x5)
I want to solve the following problem: *Fix x1, x2, x3,
and x4. *Then use Newton Raphson to return the double y
such that MyFunc(x1, x2, x3, x4, y) = 0.
I was unable to find a way of using the ready-made
function NR because it assumes f accepts 1 double and
returns 1 double, whereas My Func accepts 5 doubles and
returns 1 double.
My very-inelegant solution was to copy-paste the NR code
and adapt it so that the pointer-to-function parameter
was of the type I needed.
Is there a more elegant approach that calls on the NR
function already present?
I would change NR into a template:
template < typename Float, typename Func >
Float find_zero ( Float initial_guess, Func f );
Then, you could use bind() from c++0x or Boost to fix the
first four arguments and pass the resulting function object
into the template.
This is a very elegant solution for a few special cases, but
it results in an infection template; if the call to this
function is in a function which receives the callback
function as an argument, that function must be a template as
well.
Huh? I admit that this sentence has too many "this" and "that"
for me to get references straight. So, I do not really
understand what you mean. Anyway, I also do not see any reason
why this template could not be called from ordinary functions:
The problem is that the fact that it is a template, and is not
resolved dynamically, propagates. If the ordinary function
calls it with a known callback, fine; the propagation stops
there. But if the ordinary function calls it with a functor
that is passed in, then if templates are used, the ordinary
function has to be a template too. And so on; imagine what
would happen if iostream used templates, rather than virtual
functions, in streambuf.
template < typename Float, typename Func >
Float find_zero ( Float initial_guess, Func f ) {
* return ( 1 );
}
double caller ( double x, double(*f)(double) ) {
* return ( find_zero( x, f ) );
}
In this case, I fail to see what you've gained with respect to
the initial problem.
double id ( double x ) {
* return (x);
}
#include <iostream>
#include <ostream>
int main ( void ) {
* std::cout << caller( 1.0, &id ) << '\n';
}
(BTW: a Google search for "infection template" only yield
medical stuff.)
Yes. I'm not really sure what the appropriate word should be.
The closest analogy I can think of is the GNU license, but of
course, templates aren't that infectious. The fact remains that
any time you implement genericity with a template, it means that
any client code which wants to maintain that genericity neads to
be a template as well. Anytime you have a real choice, you
should prefer inheritance with virtual functions to templates.
(Of course, most of the time you don't have a real choice;
templates are designed to solve a different set of problems than
virtual functions.)

--
James Kanze (GABI Software) email:ja*********@gmail.com
Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
Nov 15 '08 #6

P: n/a
James Kanze wrote:
On Nov 15, 11:48*am, Kai-Uwe Bux <jkherci...@gmx.netwrote:
>James Kanze wrote:
On Nov 15, 10:26*am, Kai-Uwe Bux <jkherci...@gmx.netwrote:
pauldepst...@att.net wrote:
Let double NR( double x, double(*)(const double&) f ) *be the
signature of a Newton-Raphson function NR.
Here, f is a function which returns a double and accepts
a const double&. * * *The aim of the game is to find a
zero of this function f (the point at which f crosses the
x-axis). This zero-of-f which solves our problem is the
double which NR returns. * It remains to explain what the
"double x" represents. * This is the starting-guess that
is required in Newton-Raphson implementations.
In my case, I have the following amended Newton-Raphson
situation. *I have a function of the form
double MyFunc(double x1, double x2, double x3, double x4, double x5)
I want to solve the following problem: *Fix x1, x2, x3,
and x4. *Then use Newton Raphson to return the double y
such that MyFunc(x1, x2, x3, x4, y) = 0.
I was unable to find a way of using the ready-made
function NR because it assumes f accepts 1 double and
returns 1 double, whereas My Func accepts 5 doubles and
returns 1 double.
My very-inelegant solution was to copy-paste the NR code
and adapt it so that the pointer-to-function parameter
was of the type I needed.
Is there a more elegant approach that calls on the NR
function already present?
>I would change NR into a template:
>template < typename Float, typename Func >
Float find_zero ( Float initial_guess, Func f );
>Then, you could use bind() from c++0x or Boost to fix the
first four arguments and pass the resulting function object
into the template.
This is a very elegant solution for a few special cases, but
it results in an infection template; if the call to this
function is in a function which receives the callback
function as an argument, that function must be a template as
well.
>Huh? I admit that this sentence has too many "this" and "that"
for me to get references straight. So, I do not really
understand what you mean. Anyway, I also do not see any reason
why this template could not be called from ordinary functions:

The problem is that the fact that it is a template, and is not
resolved dynamically, propagates. If the ordinary function
calls it with a known callback, fine; the propagation stops
there. But if the ordinary function calls it with a functor
that is passed in, then if templates are used, the ordinary
function has to be a template too. And so on; imagine what
would happen if iostream used templates, rather than virtual
functions, in streambuf.
You keep using pronouns and terms like "ordinary function" whose reference
is not clear to me. Maybe, I am just dense.

So for concreteness, here is a simple template implementation of find_zero
using the Newton method:

template < typename Float, typename Func >
Float find_zero ( Func f,
Float initial_guess,
Float eps = std::numeric_limits<Float>::epsilon() * 1000,
Float h = std::numeric_limits<Float>::epsilon() * 1000,
unsigned int iteration_limit = 50 ) {
Float x = initial_guess;
for ( unsigned int n = 0; n < iteration_limit; ++n ) {
Float y = f(x);
if ( std::abs(y) < eps ) {
return (x);
}
x = x - y * h / ( f(x+h/2) - f(x-h/2) );
}
throw( std::invalid_argument( "iteration limit exceeded" ) );
}

I fail to see any problem with that. Clearly, there is no requirement that
the call back function f has to be a template or that this function can
only be called from templates. If one uses the signature

template < typename Float, typename Func >
Float find_zero ( Func const & f,
Float initial_guess,
Float eps = std::numeric_limits<Float>::epsilon() * 1000,
Float h = std::numeric_limits<Float>::epsilon() * 1000,
unsigned int iteration_limit = 50 );

one can even support the inheritance based solution you suggested
elsethread.
If you could provide code that illustrates the propagation of templates with
this example, it would be highly appreciated.

>template < typename Float, typename Func >
Float find_zero ( Float initial_guess, Func f ) {
return ( 1 );
}
>double caller ( double x, double(*f)(double) ) {
return ( find_zero( x, f ) );
}

In this case, I fail to see what you've gained with respect to
the initial problem.
Nothing: the code is just meant to illustrate why I don't see that something
propagates. That why the function is called "caller". Clearly, I am still
missing your point.

>double id ( double x ) {
return (x);
}
>#include <iostream>
#include <ostream>
>int main ( void ) {
std::cout << caller( 1.0, &id ) << '\n';
}
>(BTW: a Google search for "infection template" only yield
medical stuff.)

Yes. I'm not really sure what the appropriate word should be.
The closest analogy I can think of is the GNU license, but of
course, templates aren't that infectious. The fact remains that
any time you implement genericity with a template, it means that
any client code which wants to maintain that genericity neads to
be a template as well.
Here the key phrase is "wants to maintain that genericity". There is no
reason for client code to always be like that. All algorithms is the
standard library are templates and they are used in non-templated code. I
do not see the infectious trait you mention.

Anytime you have a real choice, you
should prefer inheritance with virtual functions to templates.
I disagree. In my codebase, that would be utterly inappropriate. More to the
point: finding roots of functions clearly seems like a task for a template
and forcing clients to inherit from some call back just to fit the
interface is clearly wrong.

(Of course, most of the time you don't have a real choice;
templates are designed to solve a different set of problems than
virtual functions.)
Agreed.
Best

Kai-Uwe Bux
Nov 16 '08 #7

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