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C++ features in LINUX?

P: n/a
Hey,
I have developed a project on C++, but under windows. But we have got
to run it in an open source (LINUX). Can anyone tell me what features
of C++ are not supported in Linux ? Like i have heard Linux doesn't
support esception handling and destructors. Similarly what about
strings and other C++ features (say class, inheritance etc.) ?
Thank you
Jul 12 '08 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
an********@gmail.com wrote:
Hey,
I have developed a project on C++, but under windows. But we have got
to run it in an open source (LINUX). Can anyone tell me what features
of C++ are not supported in Linux ? Like i have heard Linux doesn't
support esception handling and destructors. Similarly what about
strings and other C++ features (say class, inheritance etc.) ?
What utter nonsense.

The OS has nothing to do with C++ language support.

--
Ian Collins.
Jul 12 '08 #2

P: n/a
an********@gmail.com wrote:
Hey,
I have developed a project on C++, but under windows. But we have got
to run it in an open source (LINUX). Can anyone tell me what features
of C++ are not supported in Linux ? Like i have heard Linux doesn't
support esception handling and destructors. Similarly what about
strings and other C++ features (say class, inheritance etc.) ?
If anything, people insist on using VC6 under Windows and calling it "C++".

C++ is C++. The default compiler on Linux is the Gnu g++ compiler,
which is standard compliant (with the exception of "export", but
almost nobody except the people using the EDG front end supports that).

Jul 12 '08 #3

P: n/a
On Jul 12, 5:28 am, anchitg...@gmail.com wrote:
I have developed a project on C++, but under windows. But we
have got to run it in an open source (LINUX). Can anyone tell
me what features of C++ are not supported in Linux ? Like i
have heard Linux doesn't support esception handling and
destructors. Similarly what about strings and other C++
features (say class, inheritance etc.) ?
Linux (like Windows) doesn't support any "language", per se
(although it has a net preference for C). C++, like just about
every other language I know, is defined independently of the OS.
Whether a particular C++ feature is supported depends on the
compiler, not the OS, and off hand, the latest versions of VC++
and g++ seem more or less equal here, with probably a slight
edge for g++.

The real problem today in porting applications is that there are
very few applications written to use just the language. C++
makes it very easy to call a C API, and both Linux and Windows
use a C API, which means that in both languages, it is very easy
to use native OS features. And the language doesn't support a
number of very useful functionalities, like threads, windowing,
sockets, etc.; which means that programs using these do have
some system dependencies at places.

--
James Kanze (GABI Software) email:ja*********@gmail.com
Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
Jul 12 '08 #4

P: n/a
Use Cygwin to test
Jul 12 '08 #5

P: n/a
an********@gmail.com wrote:
Like i have heard Linux doesn't
support esception handling and destructors.
Thanks for the ROTFL moment. It really made my day.
Jul 12 '08 #6

P: n/a
Ian Collins wrote:
an********@gmail.com wrote:
>Hey,
I have developed a project on C++, but under windows. But we have got
to run it in an open source (LINUX). Can anyone tell me what features
of C++ are not supported in Linux ? Like i have heard Linux doesn't
support esception handling and destructors. Similarly what about
strings and other C++ features (say class, inheritance etc.) ?

What utter nonsense.
Actually, that's not true, if by Linux you mean what Linux actually is (an
operation system kernel, and _only_ the kernel).
If you want to do Linux kernel programming, like writing a device driver,
some C++ features like exceptions might indeed not work correctly, since
C++ is not supported for kernel programming.

Jul 12 '08 #7

P: n/a
Juha Nieminen wrote:
an********@gmail.com wrote:
>Like i have heard Linux doesn't
support esception handling and destructors.

Thanks for the ROTFL moment. It really made my day.
I wonder how much of such nonsense is circulating and influencing
decision making...
Jul 14 '08 #8

P: n/a
On Jul 14, 6:53*pm, Matthias Buelow <m...@incubus.dewrote:
Juha Nieminen wrote:
anchitg...@gmail.com wrote:
Like i have heard Linux doesn't
support esception handling and destructors.
* Thanks for the ROTFL moment. It really made my day.

I wonder how much of such nonsense is circulating and influencing
decision making...
As far as i know there is no Linux C++ standard or Windows C++
Standard. But C++ as language has a standard which not dependent to OS
i think. No matter what Operating System you use C++ has its own
standard, which means language features remain same no matter what
operating system you use.

I believe the problem that you face is related to the working of
functionality of your library.

Correct me if anything is wrong in what i stated!
Jul 14 '08 #9

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