473,381 Members | 1,464 Online
Bytes | Software Development & Data Engineering Community
Post Job

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Join Bytes to post your question to a community of 473,381 software developers and data experts.

replicating default constructor's "non-initializing state"

Situation:
I have a simple struct that, say, holds a color (R, G, and B). I
created my own constructors to ease its creation. As a result, I lose
the default constructor. I dislike this, but it's easy to solve: I
just make my own default constructor.

Problem:
My own default constructor is considered to be *initializing the
variable* (even though it doesn't), whereas the original one does
not. Thus, when I declare and use it before initializing it, the
compiler no longer warns me.

Question:
Are there any compiler settings (even compiler specific ones; I am
using MSVC++) that state MY default constructor behaves exactly like
the regular default constructor?

Thanks for your time,
Jason

P.S. My default constructor could initialize the variable to all 0's,
but this has two unwanted effects: 1. It slows down code in which
this initialization needn't occur. 2. It potentially hides bugs that
would show up if it were left uninitialized as it should be. (This is
similar to how MSVC++'s debugger initializes all variables to 0, which
is silly, since it should initialize them to randomness -- as will
happen in the release build -- to make bugs appear as quickly as
possible).
Apr 7 '08 #1
10 1864
Jason Doucette wrote:
Situation:
I have a simple struct that, say, holds a color (R, G, and B). I
created my own constructors to ease its creation. As a result, I lose
the default constructor. I dislike this, but it's easy to solve: I
just make my own default constructor.

Problem:
My own default constructor is considered to be *initializing the
variable* (even though it doesn't), whereas the original one does
not. Thus, when I declare and use it before initializing it, the
compiler no longer warns me.
That's your choice, isn't it? You've chosen to implement your c-tor
(which is supposed to initialise the members) in such a way that does
*not* do what it promises to do. So, why are you complaining? It is
not a problem, or at least it's very easy to solve, isn't it?
>
Question:
Are there any compiler settings (even compiler specific ones; I am
using MSVC++) that state MY default constructor behaves exactly like
the regular default constructor?
Not that I know of.
>
Thanks for your time,
Jason

P.S. My default constructor could initialize the variable to all 0's,
but this has two unwanted effects: 1. It slows down code in which
this initialization needn't occur.
Can you share the numbers, how much *does* it actually "slow down
the code"?
2. It potentially hides bugs that
would show up if it were left uninitialized as it should be.
Written *correctly* it _prevents_ bugs, not hides them.
(This is
similar to how MSVC++'s debugger initializes all variables to 0, which
is silly, since it should initialize them to randomness -- as will
happen in the release build -- to make bugs appear as quickly as
possible).
Not similar at all. When in the "debug" build variables are given
some values whereas in the "non-debug" they are not, you have a very
big problem if your code ever depends on this. When your default
c-tor initialises member variables (to 0 or whatever) *always*, there
is no randomness, and you can *rely* on the initialisation happening.

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
Apr 7 '08 #2
On Mon, 7 Apr 2008 12:07:03 -0700 (PDT), Jason Doucette
<jd*******@gmail.comwrote:
>Situation:
I have a simple struct that, say, holds a color (R, G, and B). I
created my own constructors to ease its creation. As a result, I lose
the default constructor. I dislike this, but it's easy to solve: I
just make my own default constructor.

Problem:
My own default constructor is considered to be *initializing the
variable* (even though it doesn't), whereas the original one does
not. Thus, when I declare and use it before initializing it, the
compiler no longer warns me.

Question:
Are there any compiler settings (even compiler specific ones; I am
using MSVC++) that state MY default constructor behaves exactly like
the regular default constructor?
No.
>P.S. My default constructor could initialize the variable to all 0's,
but this has two unwanted effects: 1. It slows down code in which
this initialization needn't occur.
Almost certainly by an imperceptible degree.
>2. It potentially hides bugs that
would show up if it were left uninitialized as it should be. (This is
similar to how MSVC++'s debugger initializes all variables to 0, which
is silly, since it should initialize them to randomness -- as will
happen in the release build -- to make bugs appear as quickly as
possible).
The debugger doesn't do that, and AFAIK, never has. (I've been hearing this
for many years, and I still don't know how this rumor got started.) When
certain debug options are in effect, the compiler will initialize locals to
certain non-zero patterns.

--
Doug Harrison
Visual C++ MVP
Apr 7 '08 #3
On 2008-04-07 15:19:10 -0400, "Victor Bazarov" <v.********@comAcast.netsaid:
Jason Doucette wrote:
>Question:
Are there any compiler settings (even compiler specific ones; I am
using MSVC++) that state MY default constructor behaves exactly like
the regular default constructor?

Not that I know of.
For the future, though, C++0x will let you do this:

struct S
{
S() = default;
S(int);
};

with the effect that the compiler will generate that default
constructor as if you hadn't declared the other one.

--
Pete
Roundhouse Consulting, Ltd. (www.versatilecoding.com) Author of "The
Standard C++ Library Extensions: a Tutorial and Reference
(www.petebecker.com/tr1book)

Apr 7 '08 #4
P.S. *My default constructor could initialize the variable to all 0's,
but this has two unwanted effects: *1. It slows down code in which
this initialization needn't occur.

Almost certainly by an imperceptible degree.
Agreed.

2. It potentially hides bugs that
would show up if it were left uninitialized as it should be. *(This is
similar to how MSVC++'s debugger initializes all variables to 0, which
is silly, since it should initialize them to randomness -- as will
happen in the release build -- to make bugs appear as quickly as
possible).

The debugger doesn't do that, and AFAIK, never has. (I've been hearing this
for many years, and I still don't know how this rumor got started.) When
certain debug options are in effect, the compiler will initialize locals to
certain non-zero patterns.
You are quite right. MSVC++ sets them all to C's in hex, so you can
easily see that they are uninitialized in the debugger window. I
already knew this, as I tested it with a function I made to show the
bits of any data type, so I don't know why I keep thinking they are
set to 0.

Jason
Apr 8 '08 #5
For the future, though, C++0x will let you do this:
>
struct S
{
S() = default;
S(int);
};

with the effect that the compiler will generate that default
constructor as if you hadn't declared the other one.
Wow, Pete, that's cool. C++0x is the planned new C++ standard, so, I
guess I'm not the only one who wants this functionality.

Jason
Apr 8 '08 #6
Jason Doucette wrote:
>>P.S. My default constructor could initialize the variable to all 0's,
but this has two unwanted effects: 1. It slows down code in which
this initialization needn't occur.
Almost certainly by an imperceptible degree.

Agreed.

>>2. It potentially hides bugs that
would show up if it were left uninitialized as it should be. (This is
similar to how MSVC++'s debugger initializes all variables to 0, which
is silly, since it should initialize them to randomness -- as will
happen in the release build -- to make bugs appear as quickly as
possible).
The debugger doesn't do that, and AFAIK, never has. (I've been hearing this
for many years, and I still don't know how this rumor got started.) When
certain debug options are in effect, the compiler will initialize locals to
certain non-zero patterns.

You are quite right. MSVC++ sets them all to C's in hex, so you can
easily see that they are uninitialized in the debugger window. I
already knew this, as I tested it with a function I made to show the
bits of any data type, so I don't know why I keep thinking they are
set to 0.
The reason that MSVC sets them to all 0xcc is not for easy visibility
(though that's a nice side-benefit). It's because 0xcc is the INT3
opcode in x86, which breaks to the debugger.
Apr 8 '08 #7
The reason that MSVC sets them to all 0xcc is not for easy visibility
(though that's a nice side-benefit). *It's because 0xcc is the INT3
opcode in x86, which breaks to the debugger.
Ah! Thanks! :)

Jason
Apr 8 '08 #8
red floyd wrote:
Jason Doucette wrote:
>>>P.S. My default constructor could initialize the variable to all
0's, but this has two unwanted effects: 1. It slows down code in
which this initialization needn't occur.
Almost certainly by an imperceptible degree.

Agreed.

>>>2. It potentially hides bugs that
would show up if it were left uninitialized as it should be. (This is
similar to how MSVC++'s debugger initializes all
variables to 0, which is silly, since it should initialize them to
randomness -- as will happen in the release build -- to make bugs
appear as quickly as possible).
The debugger doesn't do that, and AFAIK, never has. (I've been
hearing this for many years, and I still don't know how this rumor
got started.) When certain debug options are in effect, the
compiler will initialize locals to certain non-zero patterns.

You are quite right. MSVC++ sets them all to C's in hex, so you can
easily see that they are uninitialized in the debugger window. I
already knew this, as I tested it with a function I made to show the
bits of any data type, so I don't know why I keep thinking they are
set to 0.

The reason that MSVC sets them to all 0xcc is not for easy visibility
(though that's a nice side-benefit). It's because 0xcc is the INT3
opcode in x86, which breaks to the debugger.
As well as being an invalid pointer (it's in the top 1GB of address space
which is reserved for the kernel, attempts to access it from user-mode will
cause an access violation).
Apr 9 '08 #9
On Apr 8, 3:04 pm, red floyd <no.s...@here.dudewrote:
Jason Doucette wrote:
>P.S. My default constructor could initialize the variable to all 0's,
but this has two unwanted effects: 1. It slows down code in which
this initialization needn't occur.
Almost certainly by an imperceptible degree.
Agreed.
>2. It potentially hides bugs that
would show up if it were left uninitialized as it should be. (This is
similar to how MSVC++'s debugger initializes all variables to 0, which
is silly, since it should initialize them to randomness -- as will
happen in the release build -- to make bugs appear as quickly as
possible).
The debugger doesn't do that, and AFAIK, never has. (I've been hearing this
for many years, and I still don't know how this rumor got started.) When
certain debug options are in effect, the compiler will initialize locals to
certain non-zero patterns.
You are quite right. MSVC++ sets them all to C's in hex, so you can
easily see that they are uninitialized in the debugger window. I
already knew this, as I tested it with a function I made to show the
bits of any data type, so I don't know why I keep thinking they are
set to 0.

The reason that MSVC sets them to all 0xcc is not for easy visibility
(though that's a nice side-benefit). It's because 0xcc is the INT3
opcode in x86, which breaks to the debugger.
Since this is usually stack or heap memory, why would INT 3 be
significant? It's not likely to be executed. Deleted memory is set to
0xdd in memory and I've also seen 0xcd used for other states. Here's a
link:
http://www.docsultant.com/site2/arti...bug_codes.html

--
Paul
Apr 9 '08 #10
As well as being an invalid pointer (it's in the top 1GB of address space
which is reserved for the kernel, attempts to access it from user-mode will
cause an access violation).
Very true! I remember hearing about this some time ago...

Thanks for all your replies, Ben Voigt!

Jason
Apr 9 '08 #11

This thread has been closed and replies have been disabled. Please start a new discussion.

Similar topics

2
by: Adrian Parker | last post by:
For some reason when I call validateFields before .Update (see below), I get this error: "Consumer's even handler called a non-reentrant method in the provider" However if I comment out the...
14
by: mirnazim | last post by:
Hi, There are great Python Web Application Framework. But most of them are meant for content oriented web apps. Is there something that can ease the development of application that are not...
1
by: JKop | last post by:
Would you classify the following code as "Undefined Behaviour" or as "Non- portable"? signed main() { signed char chedder = 130; } Relevant information:
1
by: Mat DeLong | last post by:
Can someone explain this error to me? : main.cpp:9: instantiated from `void show(const LIST::List<T>&) ' main.cpp:23: instantiated from here list.cpp:58: error: dependent-name...
15
by: Sander Tekelenburg | last post by:
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 The HTML specs speak of "replaced" and "non-replaced" elements, yet for the life of me I can't find an explanation of what "replaced" is supposed...
0
by: Robert Oschler | last post by:
I have a database table with a field that is indexed as a "full-text" search, since I want the capabiity. However, I also want the ability to quickly retrieve records from that table that are ins...
2
by: thorax | last post by:
I'm having problems running a release build of an application. The application is a native C++ .NET 2003 MFC application which links to a number of other DLLs, one of which is mixed (SLGSE.dll)...
7
by: Benton | last post by:
Hi there, I have a text box which will receive its value from a pop-up date picker. The user should not be able to edit this field with the keyboard or mouse. I am using ASP.NET. If I set the...
3
by: Pierre Barbier de Reuille | last post by:
Hi, after reading the article " The Standard Librarian : Defining Iterators and Const Iterators" from Matt Austern:...
1
by: =?Utf-8?B?QWxleCBNYWdoZW4=?= | last post by:
Hi. I have Mobile site that I'm building. My problem is that all of my pages are built as Mobile ASPX pages, but occasionally, I need to use controls which are not mobile. Most specifically, the...
1
by: CloudSolutions | last post by:
Introduction: For many beginners and individual users, requiring a credit card and email registration may pose a barrier when starting to use cloud servers. However, some cloud server providers now...
0
isladogs
by: isladogs | last post by:
The next Access Europe User Group meeting will be on Wednesday 3 Apr 2024 starting at 18:00 UK time (6PM UTC+1) and finishing by 19:30 (7.30PM). In this session, we are pleased to welcome former...
0
by: taylorcarr | last post by:
A Canon printer is a smart device known for being advanced, efficient, and reliable. It is designed for home, office, and hybrid workspace use and can also be used for a variety of purposes. However,...
0
by: Charles Arthur | last post by:
How do i turn on java script on a villaon, callus and itel keypad mobile phone
0
by: aa123db | last post by:
Variable and constants Use var or let for variables and const fror constants. Var foo ='bar'; Let foo ='bar';const baz ='bar'; Functions function $name$ ($parameters$) { } ...
0
by: ryjfgjl | last post by:
In our work, we often receive Excel tables with data in the same format. If we want to analyze these data, it can be difficult to analyze them because the data is spread across multiple Excel files...
0
by: emmanuelkatto | last post by:
Hi All, I am Emmanuel katto from Uganda. I want to ask what challenges you've faced while migrating a website to cloud. Please let me know. Thanks! Emmanuel
1
by: nemocccc | last post by:
hello, everyone, I want to develop a software for my android phone for daily needs, any suggestions?
0
by: Hystou | last post by:
There are some requirements for setting up RAID: 1. The motherboard and BIOS support RAID configuration. 2. The motherboard has 2 or more available SATA protocol SSD/HDD slots (including MSATA, M.2...

By using Bytes.com and it's services, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

To disable or enable advertisements and analytics tracking please visit the manage ads & tracking page.