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Game Programming for Beginners in C++

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1. How does having a widely adopted C++ standard help game
programmers?
2. What are the advantages ans disadvantages of employing the "using"
directive?
3. Why might you define a new name for an existing type?
4. Why are there two versions of the increment operator? What's the
difference between them?
5. How can you use constants to improve your code?
Jan 28 '08 #1
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19 Replies


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yltkhuu wrote:
1. How does having a widely adopted C++ standard help game
programmers?
2. What are the advantages ans disadvantages of employing the "using"
directive?
3. Why might you define a new name for an existing type?
4. Why are there two versions of the increment operator? What's the
difference between them?
5. How can you use constants to improve your code?
A: Do your own homework!
Jan 28 '08 #2

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yltkhuu wrote:
1. How does having a widely adopted C++ standard help game
programmers?
2. What are the advantages ans disadvantages of employing the "using"
directive?
3. Why might you define a new name for an existing type?
4. Why are there two versions of the increment operator? What's the
difference between them?
5. How can you use constants to improve your code?
What are the advantages of students doing their own homework?

Brian
Jan 28 '08 #3

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On Jan 28, 3:24 pm, yltkhuu <yltk...@gmail.comwrote:
1. How does having a widely adopted C++ standard help game
programmers?
2. What are the advantages ans disadvantages of employing the "using"
directive?
3. Why might you define a new name for an existing type?
4. Why are there two versions of the increment operator? What's the
difference between them?
5. How can you use constants to improve your code?
Please quit school and never take a job programming. I don't want to
rely on anymore peers that can't do their own work, can't read for
themselves, and don't know how to code beyond ctrl-c and ctrl-v, than
I have to already.
Jan 28 '08 #4

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yltkhuu wrote:
1. How does having a widely adopted C++ standard help game
programmers?
2. What are the advantages ans disadvantages of employing the "using"
directive?
3. Why might you define a new name for an existing type?
4. Why are there two versions of the increment operator? What's the
difference between them?
5. How can you use constants to improve your code?
This reads an awful lot like homework. Is it?
Rui Maciel
Jan 28 '08 #5

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yltkhuu wrote:
1. How does having a widely adopted C++ standard help game
programmers?
2. What are the advantages ans disadvantages of employing the "using"
directive?
3. Why might you define a new name for an existing type?
4. Why are there two versions of the increment operator? What's the
difference between them?
5. How can you use constants to improve your code?
The answers can be found here:

http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lit...t.html#faq-5.2
Jan 28 '08 #6

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"yltkhuu" <yl*****@gmail.comwrote in message
news:a3**********************************@c23g2000 hsa.googlegroups.com...
1. How does having a widely adopted C++ standard help game
programmers?
It helps orphans to create wide-screen games with C++.
2. What are the advantages ans disadvantages of employing the "using"
directive?
Advantage: The "using" directive would be earning a paycheck.
Disadvantage: Someone has to provide funds for the paycheck.
3. Why might you define a new name for an existing type?
If the type stops coming when you call it by its old name.
4. Why are there two versions of the increment operator? What's the
difference between them?
Two is better than one. The difference between them is one.
5. How can you use constants to improve your code?
If your code is constant, then nobody else can
change it while you're not looking.

-Mike
Jan 29 '08 #7

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On Jan 28, 2:56*pm, "Default User" <defaultuse...@yahoo.comwrote:
yltkhuu wrote:
1. How does having a widely adopted C++ standard help game
programmers?
2. What are the advantages ans disadvantages of employing the "using"
directive?
3. Why might you define a new name for an existing type?
4. Why are there two versions of the increment operator? What's the
difference between them?
5. How can you use constants to improve your code?

What are the advantages of students doing their own homework?
How do you know this is a homework?

Jan 29 '08 #8

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On Jan 28, 3:03*pm, Christopher <cp...@austin.rr.comwrote:
On Jan 28, 3:24 pm, yltkhuu <yltk...@gmail.comwrote:
1. How does having a widely adopted C++ standard help game
programmers?
2. What are the advantages ans disadvantages of employing the "using"
directive?
3. Why might you define a new name for an existing type?
4. Why are there two versions of the increment operator? What's the
difference between them?
5. How can you use constants to improve your code?

Please quit school and never take a job programming.
What would be so bad about him NOT quitting, but then changing and
deciding to do his own work? Furthermore, how do you know this is some
sort of homework?

Jan 29 '08 #9

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mike3 wrote:
On Jan 28, 2:56 pm, "Default User" <defaultuse...@yahoo.comwrote:
>yltkhuu wrote:
>>1. How does having a widely adopted C++ standard help game
programmers?
2. What are the advantages ans disadvantages of employing the "using"
directive?
3. Why might you define a new name for an existing type?
4. Why are there two versions of the increment operator? What's the
difference between them?
5. How can you use constants to improve your code?
What are the advantages of students doing their own homework?

How do you know this is a homework?
1. The questions don't have anything to do with the subject line
(except for #1).

2. The remaining items, especially 3 and 5 are things that any C++
programmer should know.

Jan 29 '08 #10

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"mike3" <mi******@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:95**********************************@k2g2000h se.googlegroups.com...
On Jan 28, 3:03 pm, Christopher <cp...@austin.rr.comwrote:
On Jan 28, 3:24 pm, yltkhuu <yltk...@gmail.comwrote:
1. How does having a widely adopted C++ standard help game
programmers?
2. What are the advantages ans disadvantages of employing the "using"
directive?
3. Why might you define a new name for an existing type?
4. Why are there two versions of the increment operator? What's the
difference between them?
5. How can you use constants to improve your code?

Please quit school and never take a job programming.
What would be so bad about him NOT quitting, but then changing and
deciding to do his own work? Furthermore, how do you know this is some
sort of homework?

Lol! I think it is pretty obvious. 5 totally unrelated questions easily
covering the contents of a intro course curriculum. I've done enough
homework myself to decern what cut and pasted homework looks like. I've also
tutored enough students to know popular ways to get thier homework done.
I've also had the un-pleasure of working with such people after they've cut
and pasted thier way to a degree. The latter is something I would rather not
ever be responsible for promoting.

Homework aside, the format here show an obvious unwillingness to research
the answers at all before posting. It also was not posted in relation to any
attempt to code, rationalize possible answers, or offer any kind of thought
whatsoever. Such questions do not warrant answers.

Furthermore, how do we know you aren't the OP trying to convice us it isn't
homework ;) Not that it would matter. Like I said, the format warrants no
answers.
Jan 29 '08 #11

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On Jan 28, 8:32 pm, mike3 <mike4...@yahoo.comwrote:
On Jan 28, 2:56 pm, "Default User" <defaultuse...@yahoo.comwrote:
yltkhuu wrote:
1. How does having a widely adopted C++ standard help game
programmers?
2. What are the advantages ans disadvantages of employing the "using"
directive?
3. Why might you define a new name for an existing type?
4. Why are there two versions of the increment operator? What's the
difference between them?
5. How can you use constants to improve your code?
What are the advantages of students doing their own homework?

How do you know this is a homework?
Because there are no answers attempted or any attempts to think.
The worst possible act would be to supply solutions.
Obviously, he/she won't bother reading them.
Jan 29 '08 #12

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hihi, so busted xD.

Jan 29 '08 #13

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Hahahahaha you've all made my day :)
Jan 29 '08 #14

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This is just one more evidence the newest games suck much more than
ever :(

We will never see again the energy, skill and creativity used in the
Activision games made for Atari 2600 like Pitfall or Keystone Kapers
or Pressure Cooker or Frostbite...
Jan 29 '08 #15

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yltkhuu wrote:
This is not my homework. My homework involves programming. These
were the discussion questions in my book, which are not part of my
homework.
If you'd use a real name now, and give some better excuses, I might even
be willing to believe you. The least you could've done was to give your
own answers to the questions and ask about other opinions.

....

Lars
Jan 29 '08 #16

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This was my actual homework, which wasn't difficult. I find the
discussion questions more difficult.

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

int main()
{
using namespace std;
int scoreOne, scoreTwo, scoreThree;
int total;
int average;
// getting the information
cout << "If you give me your three scores, I'll tell you how good
you are";
cout << " ...on average.\n\n";
cout << "What's your first score? Type it here: ";
cin >scoreOne;
cout << "Your first score:" << scoreOne << endl;
cout << "What's your second score? Type that here, too: ";
cin >scoreTwo;
cout << "Your second score:" << scoreTwo << endl;
cout << "Last, but not least, your third score: ";
cin >scoreThree;
cout << "Your third score:" << scoreThree << endl;
// displaying results
total = scoreOne + scoreTwo + scoreThree;
cout << "Your score total is " << total << endl;
average = total / 3;
cout << "Your score average is " << average << endl;
system("PAUSE");
return 0;
}
On Jan 29, 8:37 am, Lars Uffmann <a...@nurfuerspam.dewrote:
yltkhuu wrote:
This is not my homework. My homework involves programming. These
were the discussion questions in my book, which are not part of my
homework.

If you'd use a real name now, and give some better excuses, I might even
be willing to believe you. The least you could've done was to give your
own answers to the questions and ask about other opinions.

...

Lars
Jan 29 '08 #17

P: n/a
I can understand, now, why everyone thought that I was posting my
homework and I am sorry if it was inappropriate. I don't think the
level of rudeness to my post was necessary.
On Jan 29, 8:50 am, yltkhuu <yltk...@gmail.comwrote:
This was my actual homework, which wasn't difficult. I find the
discussion questions more difficult.

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

int main()
{
using namespace std;
int scoreOne, scoreTwo, scoreThree;
int total;
int average;
// getting the information
cout << "If you give me your three scores, I'll tell you how good
you are";
cout << " ...on average.\n\n";
cout << "What's your first score? Type it here: ";
cin >scoreOne;
cout << "Your first score:" << scoreOne << endl;
cout << "What's your second score? Type that here, too: ";
cin >scoreTwo;
cout << "Your second score:" << scoreTwo << endl;
cout << "Last, but not least, your third score: ";
cin >scoreThree;
cout << "Your third score:" << scoreThree << endl;
// displaying results
total = scoreOne + scoreTwo + scoreThree;
cout << "Your score total is " << total << endl;
average = total / 3;
cout << "Your score average is " << average << endl;
system("PAUSE");
return 0;

}

On Jan 29, 8:37 am, Lars Uffmann <a...@nurfuerspam.dewrote:
yltkhuu wrote:
This is not my homework. My homework involves programming. These
were the discussion questions in my book, which are not part of my
homework.
If you'd use a real name now, and give some better excuses, I might even
be willing to believe you. The least you could've done was to give your
own answers to the questions and ask about other opinions.
...
Lars
Jan 29 '08 #18

P: n/a
On 2008-01-29 17:16, yltkhuu wrote:
This is not my homework. My homework involves programming. These
were the discussion questions in my book, which are not part of my
homework. If they were, I would not post them here. This is a
discussion group on programming in C++ for BEGINNERS.
Actually, for beginners I would recommend alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++.
Also see the FAQ, it was many good entries for beginners and more
experienced people alike: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/

--
Erik Wikström
Jan 29 '08 #19

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yltkhuu wrote:
This is not my homework.
Please don't top-post. Your replies belong following or interspersed
with properly trimmed quotes. See the majority of other posts in the
newsgroup, or the group FAQ list:
<http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/how-to-post.html>
Jan 29 '08 #20

This discussion thread is closed

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