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Dev-C++ compiling problem

Installed this compiler on Vista; a simple
"hello world" after compiled and run would pop-up a window
"source file not compiled"

I've seen this question asked a few times on Internet groups and
noone seems to have figure it out.

What is going on?

Oct 15 '07 #1
81 11039
On Oct 15, 12:23 am, S Keith Chakotay von Carpati
<is_dat_right_Im_russ...@engineer.comwrote:
Installed this compiler on Vista; a simple
"hello world" after compiled and run would pop-up a window
"source file not compiled"

I've seen this question asked a few times on Internet groups and
noone seems to have figure it out.

What is going on?
Here is someone with the same problem as myself:
http://www.programmers-corner.com/forums/about113.html

Oct 15 '07 #2
On Oct 15, 12:26 am, S Keith Chakotay von Carpati
<is_dat_right_Im_russ...@engineer.comwrote:
On Oct 15, 12:23 am, S Keith Chakotay von Carpati

<is_dat_right_Im_russ...@engineer.comwrote:
Installed this compiler on Vista; a simple
"hello world" after compiled and run would pop-up a window
"source file not compiled"
I've seen this question asked a few times on Internet groups and
noone seems to have figure it out.
What is going on?

Here is someone with the same problem as myself:http://www.programmers-corner.com/forums/about113.html

This surely is retarded; the most basic C programming problem and here
is another dude
not able to find help:

http://www.dreamincode.net/forums/showtopic13795.htm

Oct 15 '07 #3
????? S Keith Chakotay von Carpati said:
Installed this compiler on Vista; a simple
"hello world" after compiled and run would pop-up a window
"source file not compiled"

I've seen this question asked a few times on Internet groups and
noone seems to have figure it out.
The fix is easy. Use a different operating system. I can't believe you
actually paid good money for Vista. It's like buying polio.
What is going on?
Linux, if you're lucky. Failing that, XP.

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Oct 15 '07 #4
On Oct 15, 12:46 am, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
????? S Keith Chakotay von Carpati said:
Installed this compiler on Vista; a simple
"hello world" after compiled and run would pop-up a window
"source file not compiled"
I've seen this question asked a few times on Internet groups and
noone seems to have figure it out.

The fix is easy. Use a different operating system. I can't believe you
actually paid good money for Vista. It's like buying polio.
What is going on?

Linux, if you're lucky. Failing that, XP.

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
I've never thought it was about the OS.

I see here someone talking about it,
"Hi
Can anybody tell me from where to download the free C++ Compiler
compatible with windows vista. I have downloaded DEV C++ one, but
after typing the program when I hit compile there is no result shown
anywhere...."
http://www.techsupportforum.com/conv...-compiler.html

Oct 15 '07 #5
On Oct 15, 12:54 am, S Keith Chakotay von Carpati
<is_dat_right_Im_russ...@engineer.comwrote:
On Oct 15, 12:46 am, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:


????? S Keith Chakotay von Carpati said:
Installed this compiler on Vista; a simple
"hello world" after compiled and run would pop-up a window
"source file not compiled"
I've seen this question asked a few times on Internet groups and
noone seems to have figure it out.
The fix is easy. Use a different operating system. I can't believe you
actually paid good money for Vista. It's like buying polio.
What is going on?
Linux, if you're lucky. Failing that, XP.
--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999

I've never thought it was about the OS.

I see here someone talking about it,
"Hi
Can anybody tell me from where to download the free C++ Compiler
compatible with windows vista. I have downloaded DEV C++ one, but
after typing the program when I hit compile there is no result shown
anywhere...."http://www.techsupportforum.com/conversation-pit/programming/68384-re...- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


That's odd... Windows Vista was supposed to make things easier to use
and
this OS doesn't even have "Windows Help" anymore

"Why can't I get Help from this program?
The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which
was used in previous versions of Windows and it is not supported in
Windows Vista.
For more information, see Windows Help program (WinHlp32.exe) is no
longer included with Windows on the Microsoft support website."

Oct 15 '07 #6
On Oct 15, 1:07 am, S Keith Chakotay von Carpati
<is_dat_right_Im_russ...@engineer.comwrote:
On Oct 15, 12:54 am, S Keith Chakotay von Carpati

<is_dat_right_Im_russ...@engineer.comwrote:
On Oct 15, 12:46 am, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
????? S Keith Chakotay von Carpati said:
Installed this compiler on Vista; a simple
"hello world" after compiled and run would pop-up a window
"source file not compiled"
I've seen this question asked a few times on Internet groups and
noone seems to have figure it out.
The fix is easy. Use a different operating system. I can't believe you
actually paid good money for Vista. It's like buying polio.
What is going on?
Linux, if you're lucky. Failing that, XP.
--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
I've never thought it was about the OS.
I see here someone talking about it,
"Hi
Can anybody tell me from where to download the free C++ Compiler
compatible with windows vista. I have downloaded DEV C++ one, but
after typing the program when I hit compile there is no result shown
anywhere...."http://www.techsupportforum.com/conversation-pit/programming/68384-re...Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -

That's odd... Windows Vista was supposed to make things easier to use
and
this OS doesn't even have "Windows Help" anymore

"Why can't I get Help from this program?
The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which
was used in previous versions of Windows and it is not supported in
Windows Vista.
For more information, see Windows Help program (WinHlp32.exe) is no
longer included with Windows on the Microsoft support website."- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
Here is a follow-up story
Working with Vista
By: Nobody/Anonymous (nobody) - 2007-04-14 05:14
I know that there are other related threads but I thought that I
should start one showing Bloodshed Dev C working successfully under
Windows Vista

I have been a happy user of Bloodshed Dev C under Windows XP, but my
attempts to use it with Vista had always ended in failure. I had seen
forum postings where others had similar problems and where a few had
posted solutions - however their instructions didn't seem to work for
me.

This is possibly because I was trying to install the Bloodshed Dev C
with it's own builtin MinGW GCC environment (which apparently has path
related bugs). When Bloodshed was installed under Vista it seemed that
the MinGW files got put in the wrong places. Even when I manually
corrected this I couldn't make GCC find all the files it needed.

So I decided to try installing the latest candidate MinGW first and
then Install Bloodshed Dev C to use this instead of its own built in
compiler. This also has the advantage of allowing a much newer MinGW -
in fact I ended up installing GCC 4.1.2 instead of using the built in
GCC 3.4.2

Here is what I did:-
Step 1 - Install the latest candidate MinGW

Go to http://prdownloads.sourceforge.net/mingw

Download and run the current MinGW installer:- MinGW-5.1.3.exe

For installation I selected:-
Download and install
Candidate
Install MinGW base tools & MinGW Make
to
C:\MinGW

This installed the following components:-
W32api-3.9
mingw-runtime-3.12
mingw32-make-3.81
binutils-2.17.50
gcc-core-3.4.5
Step 2 - Install Bloodshed Dev C WITHOUT MinGW

Go to http://www.bloodshed.net/dev/devcpp.html

Download and run Dev-C++ 5.0 beta 9.2 (4.9.9.2), executable only (2.4
MB)

The link will get devcpp-4.9.9.2_nomingw_setup.exe from sourceforge:-
http://sourceforge.net/project/downl...ingw_setup.exe

I installed using the defaults (to C:\Dev-Cpp)
Step 3 - Configure Bloodshed Dev C to use the already installed MinGW

Run Bloodshed Dev C

(You may end up allowing Bloodshed Dev C to use MinGW Make instead of
GNU Make)

Select the Tools -Compiler Options menu item

Under the Directories -Binaries tab add two new paths (for MinGW and
GCC libexec components):-

C:\MinGW\bin
C:\MinGW\libexec\gcc\mingw32\3.4.5

And voila - now you should be able to compile programs!
P.S. and voila - still not working ;-)

http://sourceforge.net/forum/forum.p...forum_id=48211

Oct 15 '07 #7
On Oct 15, 1:46 am, S Keith Chakotay von Carpati
<is_dat_right_Im_russ...@engineer.comwrote:
On Oct 15, 1:07 am, S Keith Chakotay von Carpati

<is_dat_right_Im_russ...@engineer.comwrote:
On Oct 15, 12:54 am, S Keith Chakotay von Carpati
<is_dat_right_Im_russ...@engineer.comwrote:
On Oct 15, 12:46 am, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
????? S Keith Chakotay von Carpati said:
Installed this compiler on Vista; a simple
"hello world" after compiled and run would pop-up a window
"source file not compiled"
I've seen this question asked a few times on Internet groups and
noone seems to have figure it out.
The fix is easy. Use a different operating system. I can't believe you
actually paid good money for Vista. It's like buying polio.
What is going on?
Linux, if you're lucky. Failing that, XP.
--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
I've never thought it was about the OS.
I see here someone talking about it,
"Hi
Can anybody tell me from where to download the free C++ Compiler
compatible with windows vista. I have downloaded DEV C++ one, but
after typing the program when I hit compile there is no result shown
anywhere...."http://www.techsupportforum.com/conversation-pit/programming/68384-re...quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
That's odd... Windows Vista was supposed to make things easier to use
and
this OS doesn't even have "Windows Help" anymore
"Why can't I get Help from this program?
The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which
was used in previous versions of Windows and it is not supported in
Windows Vista.
For more information, see Windows Help program (WinHlp32.exe) is no
longer included with Windows on the Microsoft support website."- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -

Here is a follow-up story
Working with Vista
By: Nobody/Anonymous (nobody) - 2007-04-14 05:14
I know that there are other related threads but I thought that I
should start one showing Bloodshed Dev C working successfully under
Windows Vista

I have been a happy user of Bloodshed Dev C under Windows XP, but my
attempts to use it with Vista had always ended in failure. I had seen
forum postings where others had similar problems and where a few had
posted solutions - however their instructions didn't seem to work for
me.

This is possibly because I was trying to install the Bloodshed Dev C
with it's own builtin MinGW GCC environment (which apparently has path
related bugs). When Bloodshed was installed under Vista it seemed that
the MinGW files got put in the wrong places. Even when I manually
corrected this I couldn't make GCC find all the files it needed.

So I decided to try installing the latest candidate MinGW first and
then Install Bloodshed Dev C to use this instead of its own built in
compiler. This also has the advantage of allowing a much newer MinGW -
in fact I ended up installing GCC 4.1.2 instead of using the built in
GCC 3.4.2

Here is what I did:-

Step 1 - Install the latest candidate MinGW

Go tohttp://prdownloads.sourceforge.net/mingw

Download and run the current MinGW installer:- MinGW-5.1.3.exe

For installation I selected:-
Download and install
Candidate
Install MinGW base tools & MinGW Make
to
C:\MinGW

This installed the following components:-
W32api-3.9
mingw-runtime-3.12
mingw32-make-3.81
binutils-2.17.50
gcc-core-3.4.5

Step 2 - Install Bloodshed Dev C WITHOUT MinGW

Go tohttp://www.bloodshed.net/dev/devcpp.html

Download and run Dev-C++ 5.0 beta 9.2 (4.9.9.2), executable only (2.4
MB)

The link will get devcpp-4.9.9.2_nomingw_setup.exe from sourceforge:-http://sourceforge.net/project/downloading.php?groupname=dev-cpp&file...

I installed using the defaults (to C:\Dev-Cpp)

Step 3 - Configure Bloodshed Dev C to use the already installed MinGW

Run Bloodshed Dev C

(You may end up allowing Bloodshed Dev C to use MinGW Make instead of
GNU Make)

Select the Tools -Compiler Options menu item

Under the Directories -Binaries tab add two new paths (for MinGW and
GCC libexec components):-

C:\MinGW\bin
C:\MinGW\libexec\gcc\mingw32\3.4.5

And voila - now you should be able to compile programs!

P.S. and voila - still not working ;-)

http://sourceforge.net/forum/forum.p...orum_id=48211- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


What do I do now?
I get these:

Compiler: Default compiler
Building Makefile: "C:\Dev-Cpp\Makefile.win"
Executing make...
make.exe -f "C:\Dev-Cpp\Makefile.win" all
gcc.exe -c test21.c -o test21.o -I"C:/Dev-Cpp/include"

gcc.exe: installation problem, cannot exec `cc1': No such file or
directory

make.exe: *** [test21.o] Error 1

Execution terminated

Oct 15 '07 #8
S Keith Chakotay von Carpati wrote:
What do I do now?
I get these:

Compiler: Default compiler
Building Makefile: "C:\Dev-Cpp\Makefile.win"
Executing make...
make.exe -f "C:\Dev-Cpp\Makefile.win" all
gcc.exe -c test21.c -o test21.o -I"C:/Dev-Cpp/include"

gcc.exe: installation problem, cannot exec `cc1': No such file or
directory

make.exe: *** [test21.o] Error 1

Execution terminated
Please call DevCpp help desk. We are not DevCpp help desk, this
group is about the C language.

Thanks in advance for your understanding.

--
jacob navia
jacob at jacob point remcomp point fr
logiciels/informatique
http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32
Oct 15 '07 #9
On Oct 15, 2:30 am, jacob navia <ja...@nospam.orgwrote:
S Keith Chakotay von Carpati wrote:


What do I do now?
I get these:
Compiler: Default compiler
Building Makefile: "C:\Dev-Cpp\Makefile.win"
Executing make...
make.exe -f "C:\Dev-Cpp\Makefile.win" all
gcc.exe -c test21.c -o test21.o -I"C:/Dev-Cpp/include"
gcc.exe: installation problem, cannot exec `cc1': No such file or
directory
make.exe: *** [test21.o] Error 1
Execution terminated

Please call DevCpp help desk. We are not DevCpp help desk, this
group is about the C language.

Thanks in advance for your understanding.

--
jacob navia
jacob at jacob point remcomp point fr
logiciels/informatiquehttp://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
Of course; however, how can someone talk about the C language without
having a working compiler? You tell me.
It's like going on a battlefield without a rifle.

Oct 15 '07 #10
" S Keith Chakotay von Carpati" <is*********************@engineer.com>
schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:11*********************@q3g2000prf.googlegrou ps.com...
On Oct 15, 2:30 am, jacob navia <ja...@nospam.orgwrote:
S Keith Chakotay von Carpati wrote:
>Of course; however, how can someone talk about the C language without
having a working compiler? You tell me.
It's like going on a battlefield without a rifle.
If in a battle your riffle jams, would you tell the General responsible for
tactics/strategie of the battle, or take it to a weapon shop for repair?

Bye, Jojo
Oct 15 '07 #11
On Oct 15, 2:51 am, "Joachim Schmitz" <nospam.j...@schmitz-digital.de>
wrote:
" S Keith Chakotay von Carpati" <is_dat_right_Im_russ...@engineer.com>
schrieb im Newsbeitragnews:11*********************@q3g2000prf .googlegroups.com...
On Oct 15, 2:30 am, jacob navia <ja...@nospam.orgwrote:
S Keith Chakotay von Carpati wrote:
Of course; however, how can someone talk about the C language without
having a working compiler? You tell me.
It's like going on a battlefield without a rifle.

If in a battle your riffle jams, would you tell the General responsible for
tactics/strategie of the battle, or take it to a weapon shop for repair?

Bye, Jojo

Depends on the army, I guess.
It shouldn't be a problem to ask a comerade soldier
to give your rifle a kick or two in a proper way.
By the time you get to the weapon shop it may be too late...

Oct 15 '07 #12
" S Keith Chakotay von Carpati" <is*********************@engineer.com>
schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:11**********************@q3g2000prf.googlegro ups.com...
On Oct 15, 2:51 am, "Joachim Schmitz" <nospam.j...@schmitz-digital.de>
wrote:
>" S Keith Chakotay von Carpati" <is_dat_right_Im_russ...@engineer.com>
schrieb im
Newsbeitragnews:11*********************@q3g2000pr f.googlegroups.com...
On Oct 15, 2:30 am, jacob navia <ja...@nospam.orgwrote:
S Keith Chakotay von Carpati wrote:
Of course; however, how can someone talk about the C language without
having a working compiler? You tell me.
It's like going on a battlefield without a rifle.
If in a battle your riffle jams, would you tell the General responsible
for
tactics/strategie of the battle, or take it to a weapon shop for repair?
Depends on the army, I guess.
It shouldn't be a problem to ask a comerade soldier
to give your rifle a kick or two in a proper way.
By the time you get to the weapon shop it may be too late...
Then ask your comrade soldier over in a newsgroup dealing with rifles, erh,
dev-cc 8-)

Bye, Jojo
Oct 15 '07 #13

"Richard Heathfield" <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrote in message
news:5o*********************@bt.com...
????? S Keith Chakotay von Carpati said:
>Installed this compiler on Vista; a simple
"hello world" after compiled and run would pop-up a window
"source file not compiled"

I've seen this question asked a few times on Internet groups and
noone seems to have figure it out.

The fix is easy. Use a different operating system. I can't believe you
actually paid good money for Vista. It's like buying polio.
some of us ended up getting a computer that came with vista, and feel too
uncertain to switch away from this, errm, big pile of crap of an OS...

>What is going on?

Linux, if you're lucky. Failing that, XP.
yes.

otherwise, I use mingw on vista, and it works ok...

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Oct 15 '07 #14
On Oct 15, 6:08 am, "cr88192" <cr88...@nospam.hotmail.comwrote:
"Richard Heathfield" <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote in message

news:5o*********************@bt.com...
????? S Keith Chakotay von Carpati said:
Installed this compiler on Vista; a simple
"hello world" after compiled and run would pop-up a window
"source file not compiled"
I've seen this question asked a few times on Internet groups and
noone seems to have figure it out.
The fix is easy. Use a different operating system. I can't believe you
actually paid good money for Vista. It's like buying polio.

some of us ended up getting a computer that came with vista, and feel too
uncertain to switch away from this, errm, big pile of crap of an OS...
What is going on?
Linux, if you're lucky. Failing that, XP.

yes.

otherwise, I use mingw on vista, and it works ok...
--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
cr88, if you don't mind, can you share some of the
steps in your way of using mingw on vista?
Provided you've read my way of dealing with these, at the above,
where would I have possibly missed smth?

Oct 15 '07 #15
On Oct 15, 5:34 am, "Joachim Schmitz" <nospam.j...@schmitz-digital.de>
wrote:
" S Keith Chakotay von Carpati" <is_dat_right_Im_russ...@engineer.com>
schrieb im Newsbeitragnews:11**********************@q3g2000pr f.googlegroups.com...
On Oct 15, 2:51 am, "Joachim Schmitz" <nospam.j...@schmitz-digital.de>
wrote:
" S Keith Chakotay von Carpati" <is_dat_right_Im_russ...@engineer.com>
schrieb im
Newsbeitragnews:11*********************@q3g2000prf .googlegroups.com...
On Oct 15, 2:30 am, jacob navia <ja...@nospam.orgwrote:
S Keith Chakotay von Carpati wrote:
Of course; however, how can someone talk about the C language without
having a working compiler? You tell me.
It's like going on a battlefield without a rifle.
If in a battle your riffle jams, would you tell the General responsible
for
tactics/strategie of the battle, or take it to a weapon shop for repair?
Depends on the army, I guess.
It shouldn't be a problem to ask a comerade soldier
to give your rifle a kick or two in a proper way.
By the time you get to the weapon shop it may be too late...

Then ask your comrade soldier over in a newsgroup dealing with rifles, erh,
dev-cc 8-)

Bye, Jojo- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
I don't think there are such newsgroups, where they talk about dev-cc
That's why I've posted it in here.

Oct 15 '07 #16
S Keith Chakotay von Carpati wrote:

[...]
Of course; however, how can someone talk about the C language without
having a working compiler? You tell me.
A co-worker of mine, wrote programs for a period of ca. 3 years, without
a single compile error.

--
Tor <torust [at] online [dot] no>

C-FAQ: http://c-faq.com/
Oct 16 '07 #17
Well... ehm... okay... I think this question doesn't belong here, as
everybody else thinks it too...

But just to help you a bit.

Vista has some new bugs^H^H^H^Hfeatures about how to handle the security
level of the actual user.

By RTFM and "trial and failure", I've found out that even if you are an
administrator, all the programs run by default in normal user mode, till
you run them as "administrator".

To install a program, vista almost always switches in administrator mode.

After that... if you execute the program you've installed in normal user
mode (as you and others did), vista will create an empty folder with the
program's name under eg. "C:\Users\UserX\AppData".

It's a kind of a fake root directory for the application (trying to copy
chroot from Un*x?). If the program has configuration files under
"C:\Program Files\ProgramX", it won't read them if you run it as normal
user. It will try to read configuration files from the created fake
directory under "C:\Users\UserX\AppData\ProgramX", where it actually won't
find them, until you create them. This must produce the failure "file not
found" (at least I think so).

But the problem with an IDE like Dev-C++ (it is an *IDE*, not a compiler)
is, that it has to call some other programs like the c pre-processor and
the compiler (call it gcc via cygwin in your situation) too.

As you can see, a program called by another program in vista, doesn't
necessarily mean that it will run under the same user privileges the
caller-program (Dev-C++ or something else) called it.

Maybe to get Dev-C++ working, try *running it as administrator* (for more
information google it by yourself. If this doesn't work, then you should
better change your OS to Linux or Opensolaris or even WinXP (if you don't
play games with your Computer, then you will probably not need this crappy
piece of OS).

On the other side... Even the Microsoft Visual Studio(TM) (*laugh*)
doesn't run properly under vista, why should Dev-C++ run the way it
should?!? (These guys have to make their own programs to run correctly on
their own platform first!)

At the end...

If this would be a forum I would say:

<quote>
Administrator could not decide whether to move this thread under
microsoft.public.windows.vista.general or
microsoft.public.windows.vista.security !?!
</quote>

Personally I would never use vista to develop c or even c++ programs.

Greets,
Andy

PS: I'm still in exercise with my English. And sorry about my typos, I was
in a hurry!
Oct 16 '07 #18
S Keith Chakotay von Carpati wrote:
jacob navia <ja...@nospam.orgwrote:
>S Keith Chakotay von Carpati wrote:
.... snip ...
>>
>>gcc.exe: installation problem, cannot exec `cc1': No such file
or directory

make.exe: *** [test21.o] Error 1

Execution terminated

Please call DevCpp help desk. We are not DevCpp help desk, this
group is about the C language.

Thanks in advance for your understanding.
.... snip ...
>
Of course; however, how can someone talk about the C language
without having a working compiler? You tell me.
It's like going on a battlefield without a rifle.
Please snip signatures. You go to the manufacture/distributor/ or
issuers web-page or office etc. Not here, where we discuss the C
language.

--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Oct 19 '07 #19
CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
S Keith Chakotay von Carpati wrote:
Of course; however, how can someone talk about the C language
without having a working compiler? You tell me.
It's like going on a battlefield without a rifle.

Please snip signatures.
That is...
--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
....not something _you_ should be telling him.

Richard
Oct 19 '07 #20
rl*@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl (Richard Bos) writes:
CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
[...]
>Please snip signatures.
[...]
...not something _you_ should be telling him.
Why not? Sure, Chuck's signature is too long, and it happens to have
an embedded "-- "; that has no bearing on whether signatures should be
snipped when posting followups.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <* <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
"We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
-- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
Oct 19 '07 #21
Keith Thompson said:
rl*@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl (Richard Bos) writes:
>CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
[...]
>>Please snip signatures.
[...]
>...not something _you_ should be telling him.

Why not? Sure, Chuck's signature is too long, and it happens to have
an embedded "-- "; that has no bearing on whether signatures should be
snipped when posting followups.
It's called "hypocrisy", Keith. Chuck is telling people to observe
netiquette conventions, even though his signature block violates those
same conventions.

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Oct 19 '07 #22
Keith Thompson <ks***@mib.orgwrites:
rl*@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl (Richard Bos) writes:
>CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
[...]
>>Please snip signatures.
[...]
>...not something _you_ should be telling him.

Why not? Sure, Chuck's signature is too long, and it happens to have
an embedded "-- "; that has no bearing on whether signatures should be
snipped when posting followups.
How many times do you have to be reminded that "Chuck" posts with two
signatures thus not allowing some major newsreaders to correctly snip
the signature?

He is the ONLY person I know to do this and I must conclude that he is a
troll.

And yes we KNOW that teranews adds the second.
Oct 19 '07 #23
Richard <rg****@gmail.comwrites:
Keith Thompson <ks***@mib.orgwrites:
>rl*@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl (Richard Bos) writes:
>>CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
[...]
>>>Please snip signatures.
[...]
>>...not something _you_ should be telling him.

Why not? Sure, Chuck's signature is too long, and it happens to have
an embedded "-- "; that has no bearing on whether signatures should be
snipped when posting followups.

How many times do you have to be reminded that "Chuck" posts with two
signatures thus not allowing some major newsreaders to correctly snip
the signature?
Once was quite enough. Either snip it yourself or stop replying to
his articles.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <* <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
"We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
-- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
Oct 19 '07 #24
In article <47***************@news.xs4all.nl>,
Richard Bos <rl*@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nlwrote:
>CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
>S Keith Chakotay von Carpati wrote:
Of course; however, how can someone talk about the C language
without having a working compiler? You tell me.
It's like going on a battlefield without a rifle.

Please snip signatures.

That is...
>--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

...not something _you_ should be telling him.

Richard
Indeed. Welcome to the group of CLC posters who have realized what a
hypocritical turd CBF is. Hope you enjoy your stay.

Oct 19 '07 #25
In article <_-*********************@bt.com>,
Richard Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrote:
>Keith Thompson said:
>rl*@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl (Richard Bos) writes:
>>CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
[...]
>>>Please snip signatures.
[...]
>>...not something _you_ should be telling him.

Why not? Sure, Chuck's signature is too long, and it happens to have
an embedded "-- "; that has no bearing on whether signatures should be
snipped when posting followups.

It's called "hypocrisy", Keith. Chuck is telling people to observe
netiquette conventions, even though his signature block violates those
same conventions.
And here I find myself (gasp!) agreeing with Heathfield.
Will wonders never cease.

P.S. I just *love* it when the two main CLC chicks (KT,RH) fight.

Oct 19 '07 #26
ga*****@xmission.xmission.com (Kenny McCormack) writes:
In article <_-*********************@bt.com>,
Richard Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrote:
>>Keith Thompson said:
>>rl*@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl (Richard Bos) writes:
CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
[...]
Please snip signatures.
[...]
...not something _you_ should be telling him.

Why not? Sure, Chuck's signature is too long, and it happens to have
an embedded "-- "; that has no bearing on whether signatures should be
snipped when posting followups.

It's called "hypocrisy", Keith. Chuck is telling people to observe
netiquette conventions, even though his signature block violates those
same conventions.

And here I find myself (gasp!) agreeing with Heathfield.
Will wonders never cease.
Actually I agree with RH a lot. It's just the prissy "off topic" garbage
which gets my goat. Give him his due, he knows his C better than most.
Oct 19 '07 #27
In article <k6************@news.individual.net>,
Richard <rg****@gmail.comwrote:
....
>And here I find myself (gasp!) agreeing with Heathfield.
Will wonders never cease.

Actually I agree with RH a lot. It's just the prissy "off topic" garbage
which gets my goat. Give him his due, he knows his C better than most.
Well, that, and the incessant Navia-bashing, from which he obviously
derives great psychic pleasure.

Now, mind you, I'm not really a Navia fan/supporter - he reminds me of
nothing so much as the proverbial guy walking around with a "Kick Me!"
sign on his back. But still, I find Heathfield's (and his sock puppets')
attacks pretty juvenile.

Oct 19 '07 #28
Richard Bos wrote:
CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
>>Please snip signatures.

That is...
>>--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

...not something _you_ should be telling him.
It may not be his fault. Have you actually read his sig?
Oct 19 '07 #29
Keith Thompson wrote:
Um, have you read the endless discussions about his sig?
<snip>
All this has been argued at tedious length by people who *have*
actually read his sig.
No, I have not followed the discussion. I meant to suggest that
such a discussion would be pointless, but, as it seems, those
participating in it already know it. I'll get my coat. Sorry.
Oct 19 '07 #30
"Richard" <rg****@gmail.coma crit dans le message de news:
ck************@news.individual.net...
Keith Thompson <ks***@mib.orgwrites:
>rl*@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl (Richard Bos) writes:
>>CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
[...]
>>>Please snip signatures.
[...]
>>...not something _you_ should be telling him.

Why not? Sure, Chuck's signature is too long, and it happens to have
an embedded "-- "; that has no bearing on whether signatures should be
snipped when posting followups.

How many times do you have to be reminded that "Chuck" posts with two
signatures thus not allowing some major newsreaders to correctly snip
the signature?

He is the ONLY person I know to do this and I must conclude that he is a
troll.

And yes we KNOW that teranews adds the second.
What if Chucks signature did not end with a newline ?
The teranews footer would not appear flush left and the newsreaders would
not misinterpret it as his signature.

--
Chqrlie.
Oct 20 '07 #31
"Charlie Gordon" <ne**@chqrlie.orgwrites:
"Richard" <rg****@gmail.coma crit dans le message de news:
ck************@news.individual.net...
>Keith Thompson <ks***@mib.orgwrites:
>>rl*@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl (Richard Bos) writes:
CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
[...]
Please snip signatures.
[...]
...not something _you_ should be telling him.

Why not? Sure, Chuck's signature is too long, and it happens to have
an embedded "-- "; that has no bearing on whether signatures should be
snipped when posting followups.

How many times do you have to be reminded that "Chuck" posts with two
signatures thus not allowing some major newsreaders to correctly snip
the signature?

He is the ONLY person I know to do this and I must conclude that he is a
troll.

And yes we KNOW that teranews adds the second.

What if Chucks signature did not end with a newline ?
The teranews footer would not appear flush left and the newsreaders would
not misinterpret it as his signature.
My suspicion is that the teranews footer includes one or more blank
lines before the "-- " delimiter. If Chuck's own signature does end
in a newline, deleting it would probably make the composite signature
one line shorter, which would be an improvement.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <* <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
"We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
-- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
Oct 20 '07 #32
On Fri, 19 Oct 2007 08:10:23 +0000, in comp.lang.c , Richard
Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrote:
>Keith Thompson said:
>rl*@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl (Richard Bos) writes:
>>CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
[...]
>>>Please snip signatures.
[...]
>>...not something _you_ should be telling him.

Why not? Sure, Chuck's signature is too long, and it happens to have
an embedded "-- "; that has no bearing on whether signatures should be
snipped when posting followups.

It's called "hypocrisy", Keith.
Gratuitous.
>Chuck is telling people to observe
netiquette conventions, even though his signature block violates those
same conventions.
We've been over this. Chuck's signature is modified outside his
control. Obviously he could swap newsfeeds, or post with no sig - but
who are we do dicate his choice of newsfeed, or to demand he be
sigless. Plenty of us have sigs, and some of us occasionally use
lengthy ones. At least Chuck's isn't a 2000-line diatribe.

--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Oct 20 '07 #33
In article <jm********************************@4ax.com>,
Mark McIntyre <ma**********@spamcop.netwrote:
....
>We've been over this. Chuck's signature is modified outside his
control. Obviously he could swap newsfeeds, or post with no sig - but
who are we do dicate his choice of newsfeed, or to demand he be
sigless. Plenty of us have sigs, and some of us occasionally use
lengthy ones. At least Chuck's isn't a 2000-line diatribe.
It's really very simple. People in glass houses should not throw
stones, EVEN IF it is not their fault that their house is made of glass.

In this case, the combination of Chuck's every other posting being a
bash on sigs and/or other form-not-substance topics, while himself having a
ridiculous sig, is just too good to pass up.

Oct 20 '07 #34
Richard Heathfield wrote:
Keith Thompson said:
>rl*@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl (Richard Bos) writes:
>>CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
[...]
>>>Please snip signatures.
[...]
>>...not something _you_ should be telling him.

Why not? Sure, Chuck's signature is too long, and it happens to
have an embedded "-- "; that has no bearing on whether signatures
should be snipped when posting followups.

It's called "hypocrisy", Keith. Chuck is telling people to observe
netiquette conventions, even though his signature block violates
those same conventions.
No it doesn't. It leaves here with a perfectly compliant
signature. What the various systems do in the process of passing
it on (and sometimes delaying it for a week) has nothing whatsoever
to do with my sig. You know this and are just troublemaking.

--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>
---------- END of sig as transmitted here ----------
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Oct 22 '07 #35
Keith Thompson wrote:
Peter Pichler <us****@pichler.co.ukwrites:
.... snip ...
>
>It may not be his fault. Have you actually read his sig?

Um, have you read the endless discussions about his sig?
As to the suggestions on changing news-servers, there are
ancilliary reasons here for not doing so, involving my personal
convenience and record keeping. I may decide differently later,
but that is really my affair.

--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Oct 22 '07 #36
CBFalconer said:
Richard Heathfield wrote:
>Keith Thompson said:
>>rl*@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl (Richard Bos) writes:
CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.comwrote:
[...]
Please snip signatures.
[...]
...not something _you_ should be telling him.

Why not? Sure, Chuck's signature is too long, and it happens to
have an embedded "-- "; that has no bearing on whether signatures
should be snipped when posting followups.

It's called "hypocrisy", Keith. Chuck is telling people to observe
netiquette conventions, even though his signature block violates
those same conventions.

No it doesn't. It leaves here with a perfectly compliant
signature.
I go by what I see in the newsgroup. That's all I *can* go by. And
according to what I see here, your sig block is twice the recommended
maximum number of lines. But see below.

What the various systems do in the process of passing
it on (and sometimes delaying it for a week) has nothing whatsoever
to do with my sig.
I am responsible for the articles I post here, and you are responsible for
yours. If my news service habitually hacked my articles to add
advertisements, I'd find a different news service.
You know this and are just troublemaking.
No, Chuck, I'm not, and you ought to know me better than that. I don't give
two hoots about how long your sig is, since it doesn't affect me one bit
(I'm on broadband nowadays). What I do give two hoots about is the
contrast between your demands that other people should observe netiquette
conventions and your own special pleading that netiquette conventions do
not apply to you. It's hypocritical. If you cannot, for whatever reason,
enforce the conventions of netiquette on your own articles, then you are
in no position to demand such enforcement from others.

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Oct 22 '07 #37
"CBFalconer" <cb********@yahoo.coma crit dans le message de news:
47***************@yahoo.com...
Keith Thompson wrote:
>Peter Pichler <us****@pichler.co.ukwrites:
... snip ...
>>
>>It may not be his fault. Have you actually read his sig?

Um, have you read the endless discussions about his sig?

As to the suggestions on changing news-servers, there are
ancilliary reasons here for not doing so, involving my personal
convenience and record keeping. I may decide differently later,
but that is really my affair.
This is really the response to your question on a different thread:
Why do people keep using these obsolete formats, when there exists
an ISO standard for the operation (close to the Japanese format)?
Because there are ancillary reasons everywhere for not changing local use:
personal habits, convenience, record keeping, local consistency... Even if
people were to agree that a change might bring improvements, they want to
keep it their affair when and how to change, or even to change at all. Just
think of the metric system for a perfect example.

--
Chqrlie.
Oct 22 '07 #38
In article <sN******************************@bt.com>,
Richard Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrote:
....
>No, Chuck, I'm not, and you ought to know me better than that. I don't give
two hoots about how long your sig is, since it doesn't affect me one bit
(I'm on broadband nowadays). What I do give two hoots about is the
contrast between your demands that other people should observe netiquette
conventions and your own special pleading that netiquette conventions do
not apply to you. It's hypocritical. If you cannot, for whatever reason,
enforce the conventions of netiquette on your own articles, then you are
in no position to demand such enforcement from others.
Exactly. Well put.

(Wow, will wonders never cease?)

Note, BTW, that there are those (not me) who are not bothered by hypocrisy.
I.e., if you truly are doing the Lord's work (whether you be a wayward
Usenet poster or a wayward Senator from Idaho), that fact is not reduced
by the fact that you are unable to heal thyself. I.e., you are still
doing the Lord's work.

Obviously, sensible people don't buy this sh*t, but Republicans
generally do.

Oct 22 '07 #39
On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 14:51:49 +0000, in comp.lang.c , Richard
Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrote:
>CBFalconer said:
>Richard Heathfield wrote:
>>It's called "hypocrisy",

No it doesn't. It leaves here with a perfectly compliant
signature.

I go by what I see in the newsgroup. That's all I *can* go by.
Lets say all posts from RJH got mangled by some malicious server, so
that everyone reading in say Southeastern US and Myanmar saw a comment
postpended linking Jesus and Budda in a sexual act, or even (heavens
forfend) a 30-line advert for that news server, would that be _your_
fault? Would _you_ personally have to do something about it?
>What the various systems do in the process of passing
it on (and sometimes delaying it for a week) has nothing whatsoever
to do with my sig.

I am responsible for the articles I post here, and you are responsible for
yours.
To the extent you have any control. Don't pretend you don't
understand the point.
>If my news service habitually hacked my articles to add
advertisements, I'd find a different news service.
Perhaps you would, perhaps you wouldn't. Would you break a 12-month
contract? What if it was tied to a deal for cheap webhosting? What if
your ISP blocked port 119 except for this particular service?
>You know this and are just troublemaking.

No, Chuck, I'm not, and you ought to know me better than that.
Your comment above that it is hyprocisy can be seen as nothing other
than trouble-making. What other purpose did it serve?
>What I do give two hoots about is the
contrast between your demands that other people should observe netiquette
conventions and your own special pleading that netiquette conventions do
not apply to you. It's hypocritical. If you cannot, for whatever reason,
enforce the conventions of netiquette on your own articles, then you are
in no position to demand such enforcement from others.
Strawman (to quote yourself). That argument is worthy only of the
Daily Mail.

I've no doubt for example that many of us speed and take office
stationery home. Both are failures to abide by rules of society. Does
that mean we are ineligible from asking others not to burgle or
assault us, or from sitting on a jury?
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Oct 22 '07 #40
Mark McIntyre wrote:

<snip>
I've no doubt for example that many of us speed and take office
stationery home. Both are failures to abide by rules of society. Does
that mean we are ineligible from asking others not to burgle or
assault us, or from sitting on a jury?
Not ineligible but hypocritic to do so.

Oct 22 '07 #41
On Tue, 23 Oct 2007 03:38:06 +0530, in comp.lang.c , santosh
<sa*********@gmail.comwrote:
>Mark McIntyre wrote:

<snip>
>I've no doubt for example that many of us speed and take office
stationery home. Both are failures to abide by rules of society. Does
that mean we are ineligible from asking others not to burgle or
assault us, or from sitting on a jury?

Not ineligible but hypocritic to do so.
By that brush we are all hypocrites and the word has no meaning, for
who amongst us can claim _never_ to have broken a rule?

Personally, I reserve pejorative words for where they're deserved,
rather than where priggishness might put them.
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Oct 22 '07 #42
Richard Heathfield wrote:
>
.... snip ...
>
No, Chuck, I'm not, and you ought to know me better than that. I
don't give two hoots about how long your sig is, since it doesn't
affect me one bit (I'm on broadband nowadays). What I do give two
hoots about is the contrast between your demands that other people
should observe netiquette conventions and your own special
pleading that netiquette conventions do not apply to you. It's
hypocritical. If you cannot, for whatever reason, enforce the
conventions of netiquette on your own articles, then you are in no
position to demand such enforcement from others.
So, according to your lights, if we write a letter to the editor
(of some journal, newspaper, etc.) and the editor edits that before
publication (without checking with the author) we are still
responsible for that altered content? Isn't this a reasonable
interpretation?

--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Oct 23 '07 #43
CBFalconer said:
Richard Heathfield wrote:
>>
... snip ...
>>
No, Chuck, I'm not, and you ought to know me better than that. I
don't give two hoots about how long your sig is, since it doesn't
affect me one bit (I'm on broadband nowadays). What I do give two
hoots about is the contrast between your demands that other people
should observe netiquette conventions and your own special
pleading that netiquette conventions do not apply to you. It's
hypocritical. If you cannot, for whatever reason, enforce the
conventions of netiquette on your own articles, then you are in no
position to demand such enforcement from others.

So, according to your lights, if we write a letter to the editor
(of some journal, newspaper, etc.) and the editor edits that before
publication (without checking with the author) we are still
responsible for that altered content? Isn't this a reasonable
interpretation?
It's not a great analogy (because a letter to a newspaper typically appears
only in that newspaper and therefore is read only by readers of that
newspaper, whereas a Usenet article will be transmitted to many servers,
most of which do not share your server's "editorial policy"), but let's
run with it for now, and let us assume that the editor's modifications are
in some way "bad". For example, we might imagine that the editor in'sert's
a grocer's apo'strophe before every 's in your mi's'sive.

The first time you write a letter to a newspaper and discover that it has
been detrimentally edited, you certainly have the right to be surprised
and annoyed by it. But if you write a great many letters to the editor,
and every single one is detrimentally edited, then that isn't really
enough - but you do have some options:

(1) take it up with the editor;
(2) write to some other newspaper instead;
(3) stop writing letters altogether;
(4) continue as you are doing.

(1) and (2) both make sense. It would be unfair on you to recommend (3).
But (4) implies an acceptance of an editorial policy that violates basic
rules of punctuation, in which case it would be somewhat hypocritical to
start complaining about people who, say, keep inserting wayward, commas,
in, their, letters.

In Usenet terms, you can:

(1) complain to your ISP;
(2) use a different ISP;
(3) stop using Usenet;
(4) ignore the problem.

(1) is a reasonable course. So is (2). Nobody is suggesting (3). (4) is
what you are doing at the moment. This, too, is a not unreasonable course,
but it does mean that every single article you post breaches netiquette
conventions. Whilst this is perfectly understandable in your situation, it
significantly weakens your justification for criticising other people's
netiquette breaches.

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Oct 23 '07 #44
Richard Heathfield wrote:
CBFalconer said:
>Richard Heathfield wrote:
>>>
... snip ...
>>>
No, Chuck, I'm not, and you ought to know me better than that. I
don't give two hoots about how long your sig is, since it doesn't
affect me one bit (I'm on broadband nowadays). What I do give two
hoots about is the contrast between your demands that other people
should observe netiquette conventions and your own special
pleading that netiquette conventions do not apply to you. It's
hypocritical. If you cannot, for whatever reason, enforce the
conventions of netiquette on your own articles, then you are in no
position to demand such enforcement from others.

So, according to your lights, if we write a letter to the editor
(of some journal, newspaper, etc.) and the editor edits that before
publication (without checking with the author) we are still
responsible for that altered content? Isn't this a reasonable
interpretation?
.... snip ...
>
In Usenet terms, you can:

(1) complain to your ISP;
(2) use a different ISP;
(3) stop using Usenet;
(4) ignore the problem.

(1) is a reasonable course. So is (2). Nobody is suggesting (3).
(4) is what you are doing at the moment. This, too, is a not
unreasonable course, but it does mean that every single article
you post breaches netiquette conventions. Whilst this is
perfectly understandable in your situation, it significantly
weakens your justification for criticising other people's
netiquette breaches.
I'll go along with 'weakens slightly'. The slightly is because the
so-called 4 line maximum is only a recommendation, not a
requirement.

--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Oct 23 '07 #45
CBFalconer said:
Richard Heathfield wrote:
<snip>
>Whilst this is
perfectly understandable in your situation, it significantly
weakens your justification for criticising other people's
netiquette breaches.

I'll go along with 'weakens slightly'. The slightly is because the
so-called 4 line maximum is only a recommendation, not a
requirement.
So are the behaviours about which you often complain, such as the failure
to snip signatures.

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Oct 23 '07 #46
Richard Heathfield wrote:
CBFalconer said:
>Richard Heathfield wrote:

<snip>
>>Whilst this is
perfectly understandable in your situation, it significantly
weakens your justification for criticising other people's
netiquette breaches.

I'll go along with 'weakens slightly'. The slightly is because
the so-called 4 line maximum is only a recommendation, not a
requirement.

So are the behaviours about which you often complain, such as the
failure to snip signatures.
And you may have noticed I don't make demands. I advise and
request. The typical message is of the form "Please do (or don't)
<whatever>".

--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Oct 23 '07 #47
In article <47***************@yahoo.com>,
CBFalconer <cb********@maineline.netwrote:
>Richard Heathfield wrote:
>CBFalconer said:
>>Richard Heathfield wrote:

<snip>
>>>Whilst this is
perfectly understandable in your situation, it significantly
weakens your justification for criticising other people's
netiquette breaches.

I'll go along with 'weakens slightly'. The slightly is because
the so-called 4 line maximum is only a recommendation, not a
requirement.

So are the behaviours about which you often complain, such as the
failure to snip signatures.

And you may have noticed I don't make demands. I advise and
request. The typical message is of the form "Please do (or don't)
<whatever>".
In CLC-speak, "Please" is a demand.
I think this is pretty well understood.

(To the extent that anyone can make a demand in the online-world...)

Oct 24 '07 #48
CBFalconer said:

<snip>
And you may have noticed I don't make demands. I advise and
request. The typical message is of the form "Please do (or don't)
<whatever>".
Fine. Please do fix your sig block to conform to netiquette conventions or,
failing that, please don't advise others about conforming to netiquette
conventions.

Chuck, you're wiggling on a stick, and it's silly. Why don't you just fix
the sig block, switch ISP, or stop nagging other people to do something
you yourself won't do?

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Oct 24 '07 #49
On Wed, 24 Oct 2007 04:43:13 +0000, in comp.lang.c , Richard
Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrote:
>Chuck, you're wiggling on a stick, and it's silly. Why don't you just fix
the sig block, switch ISP, or stop nagging other people to do something
you yourself won't do?
Talk about sanctimonious prats.
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Oct 25 '07 #50

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