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3 dimensional array

I am simulating a display that consists of 20x20 pixels. All pixels are
per default white but I would like to be able to turn on some or all the
pixels.

My idea was to create a 3 dimensional array:

in a[][][]

where the first index is the potential numbers of pixels that I would
like to paint (20x20). The following two index should be the coordinates
for the pixels that should be painted. If I want to paint 3 pixels
(2,4), (17,9), (10,3) the following should be made:

a[0][2][4];
a[1][17][9];
a[2][10][3];

But when I declare a 3-dim array:

a[][][];
I get:

error: declaration of a as multidimensional array must have bounds for
all dimensions except the first

I have then tried:

a[20*20][20*20][20*20];

But is there not some way to accomplish my above 3 pixels without making
such a huge array?
Sep 18 '07 #1
8 4319
desktop wrote:
I am simulating a display that consists of 20x20 pixels. All pixels
are per default white but I would like to be able to turn on some or
all the pixels.
By "turn on" you mean make them black?
>
My idea was to create a 3 dimensional array:

in a[][][]
I believe you meant

int a[][][]
where the first index is the potential numbers of pixels that I would
like to paint (20x20). The following two index should be the
coordinates for the pixels that should be painted. If I want to paint
3 pixels (2,4), (17,9), (10,3) the following should be made:

a[0][2][4];
a[1][17][9];
a[2][10][3];
What's the meaning of [2]? What does it mean "shoudl be made"?
But when I declare a 3-dim array:

a[][][];
I get:

error: declaration of a as multidimensional array must have bounds
for all dimensions except the first
Yes. Any array needs its size defined.
>
I have then tried:

a[20*20][20*20][20*20];

But is there not some way to accomplish my above 3 pixels without
making such a huge array?
Each pixel can be modelled by a single element in the array. That
means you need

char a[20][20] = {}; // initially zero

and if you want to set certain pixels to something, do

a[2][4] = 1;
a[17][9] = 1;
a[10][3] = 1;

(or any other non-zero value). You could even use 'bool', but then
if you suddenly want 255 levels of gray, you'd have to rewrite it.

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
Sep 18 '07 #2
Victor Bazarov wrote:
desktop wrote:
>I am simulating a display that consists of 20x20 pixels. All pixels
are per default white but I would like to be able to turn on some or
all the pixels.

By "turn on" you mean make them black?
>My idea was to create a 3 dimensional array:

in a[][][]

I believe you meant

int a[][][]
>where the first index is the potential numbers of pixels that I would
like to paint (20x20). The following two index should be the
coordinates for the pixels that should be painted. If I want to paint
3 pixels (2,4), (17,9), (10,3) the following should be made:

a[0][2][4];
a[1][17][9];
a[2][10][3];

What's the meaning of [2]? What does it mean "shoudl be made"?
>But when I declare a 3-dim array:

a[][][];
I get:

error: declaration of a as multidimensional array must have bounds
for all dimensions except the first

Yes. Any array needs its size defined.
>I have then tried:

a[20*20][20*20][20*20];

But is there not some way to accomplish my above 3 pixels without
making such a huge array?

Each pixel can be modelled by a single element in the array. That
means you need

char a[20][20] = {}; // initially zero

and if you want to set certain pixels to something, do

a[2][4] = 1;
a[17][9] = 1;
a[10][3] = 1;

(or any other non-zero value). You could even use 'bool', but then
if you suddenly want 255 levels of gray, you'd have to rewrite it.

V
But now I have to iterate through the whole matrix with a nested for
loop to print/draw only 3 pixels.

Instead I would like to iterate an array corresponding to the number of
pixels that I want to draw (in this case 3) and for each index extract
the coordinate.

I was thinking of making a vector consisting of std::pair's instead
since the idea of double or triple indexing a binary value seems to
expensive (later I want to extend the window to 1024x768).
Sep 18 '07 #3
desktop wrote:
Victor Bazarov wrote:
>desktop wrote:
>>I am simulating a display that consists of 20x20 pixels. All pixels
are per default white but I would like to be able to turn on some or
all the pixels.

By "turn on" you mean make them black?
>>My idea was to create a 3 dimensional array:

in a[][][]

I believe you meant

int a[][][]
>>where the first index is the potential numbers of pixels that I would
like to paint (20x20). The following two index should be the
coordinates for the pixels that should be painted. If I want to paint
3 pixels (2,4), (17,9), (10,3) the following should be made:

a[0][2][4];
a[1][17][9];
a[2][10][3];

What's the meaning of [2]? What does it mean "shoudl be made"?
>>But when I declare a 3-dim array:

a[][][];
I get:

error: declaration of a as multidimensional array must have bounds
for all dimensions except the first

Yes. Any array needs its size defined.
>>I have then tried:

a[20*20][20*20][20*20];

But is there not some way to accomplish my above 3 pixels without
making such a huge array?

Each pixel can be modelled by a single element in the array. That
means you need

char a[20][20] = {}; // initially zero

and if you want to set certain pixels to something, do

a[2][4] = 1;
a[17][9] = 1;
a[10][3] = 1;

(or any other non-zero value). You could even use 'bool', but then
if you suddenly want 255 levels of gray, you'd have to rewrite it.

V

But now I have to iterate through the whole matrix with a nested for
loop to print/draw only 3 pixels.

Instead I would like to iterate an array corresponding to the number of
pixels that I want to draw (in this case 3) and for each index extract
the coordinate.

I was thinking of making a vector consisting of std::pair's instead
since the idea of double or triple indexing a binary value seems to
expensive (later I want to extend the window to 1024x768).
This seems to be a data structure problem. You have two basic choices
here: 1) make a 2D array where each element corresponds to a single
pixel; 2) make a list where each element is a single pixel that is
turned on. Each has its pros and cons-- an array allows you to quickly
determine if a *particular* pixel is turned on, a list allows you to
quickly iterate over *all* pixels that are turned on. Without knowing
what you intend to do, we can't recommend one over the other.

FWIW, array vs. list is a ubiquitous issue in all sorts of programming
problems. Weigh the pros and cons and see which better suits your
needs, or make your own structure if neither is sufficient.
Sep 18 '07 #4
Mark P wrote:
desktop wrote:
>Victor Bazarov wrote:
>>desktop wrote:
I am simulating a display that consists of 20x20 pixels. All pixels
are per default white but I would like to be able to turn on some or
all the pixels.

By "turn on" you mean make them black?

My idea was to create a 3 dimensional array:

in a[][][]

I believe you meant

int a[][][]

where the first index is the potential numbers of pixels that I would
like to paint (20x20). The following two index should be the
coordinates for the pixels that should be painted. If I want to paint
3 pixels (2,4), (17,9), (10,3) the following should be made:

a[0][2][4];
a[1][17][9];
a[2][10][3];

What's the meaning of [2]? What does it mean "shoudl be made"?

But when I declare a 3-dim array:

a[][][];
I get:

error: declaration of a as multidimensional array must have bounds
for all dimensions except the first

Yes. Any array needs its size defined.

I have then tried:

a[20*20][20*20][20*20];

But is there not some way to accomplish my above 3 pixels without
making such a huge array?

Each pixel can be modelled by a single element in the array. That
means you need

char a[20][20] = {}; // initially zero

and if you want to set certain pixels to something, do

a[2][4] = 1;
a[17][9] = 1;
a[10][3] = 1;

(or any other non-zero value). You could even use 'bool', but then
if you suddenly want 255 levels of gray, you'd have to rewrite it.

V

But now I have to iterate through the whole matrix with a nested for
loop to print/draw only 3 pixels.

Instead I would like to iterate an array corresponding to the number
of pixels that I want to draw (in this case 3) and for each index
extract the coordinate.

I was thinking of making a vector consisting of std::pair's instead
since the idea of double or triple indexing a binary value seems to
expensive (later I want to extend the window to 1024x768).

This seems to be a data structure problem. You have two basic choices
here: 1) make a 2D array where each element corresponds to a single
pixel; 2) make a list where each element is a single pixel that is
turned on. Each has its pros and cons-- an array allows you to quickly
determine if a *particular* pixel is turned on, a list allows you to
quickly iterate over *all* pixels that are turned on. Without knowing
what you intend to do, we can't recommend one over the other.

FWIW, array vs. list is a ubiquitous issue in all sorts of programming
problems. Weigh the pros and cons and see which better suits your
needs, or make your own structure if neither is sufficient.
I think I have found a solution. I just make two global int arrays and a
global pointer:

int x[20*20];
int y[20*20];
int counter = 0;

Each time I want to store a pixel I just do the following:

x[counter] = x_coord;
y[counter] = y_coord;
counter++;

I can then read the coordinates from the two arrays afterwards...seems
pretty simple and efficient.
Sep 18 '07 #5
desktop wrote:
Mark P wrote:
>desktop wrote:
>>Victor Bazarov wrote:
desktop wrote:
I am simulating a display that consists of 20x20 pixels. All pixels
are per default white but I would like to be able to turn on some or
all the pixels.

By "turn on" you mean make them black?

My idea was to create a 3 dimensional array:
>
in a[][][]

I believe you meant

int a[][][]

where the first index is the potential numbers of pixels that I would
like to paint (20x20). The following two index should be the
coordinates for the pixels that should be painted. If I want to paint
3 pixels (2,4), (17,9), (10,3) the following should be made:
>
a[0][2][4];
a[1][17][9];
a[2][10][3];

What's the meaning of [2]? What does it mean "shoudl be made"?

But when I declare a 3-dim array:
>
a[][][];
>
>
I get:
>
error: declaration of a as multidimensional array must have bounds
for all dimensions except the first

Yes. Any array needs its size defined.

I have then tried:
>
a[20*20][20*20][20*20];
>
But is there not some way to accomplish my above 3 pixels without
making such a huge array?

Each pixel can be modelled by a single element in the array. That
means you need

char a[20][20] = {}; // initially zero

and if you want to set certain pixels to something, do

a[2][4] = 1;
a[17][9] = 1;
a[10][3] = 1;

(or any other non-zero value). You could even use 'bool', but then
if you suddenly want 255 levels of gray, you'd have to rewrite it.

V

But now I have to iterate through the whole matrix with a nested for
loop to print/draw only 3 pixels.

Instead I would like to iterate an array corresponding to the number
of pixels that I want to draw (in this case 3) and for each index
extract the coordinate.

I was thinking of making a vector consisting of std::pair's instead
since the idea of double or triple indexing a binary value seems to
expensive (later I want to extend the window to 1024x768).

This seems to be a data structure problem. You have two basic choices
here: 1) make a 2D array where each element corresponds to a single
pixel; 2) make a list where each element is a single pixel that is
turned on. Each has its pros and cons-- an array allows you to
quickly determine if a *particular* pixel is turned on, a list allows
you to quickly iterate over *all* pixels that are turned on. Without
knowing what you intend to do, we can't recommend one over the other.

FWIW, array vs. list is a ubiquitous issue in all sorts of programming
problems. Weigh the pros and cons and see which better suits your
needs, or make your own structure if neither is sufficient.

I think I have found a solution. I just make two global int arrays and a
global pointer:

int x[20*20];
int y[20*20];
int counter = 0;

Each time I want to store a pixel I just do the following:

x[counter] = x_coord;
y[counter] = y_coord;
counter++;

I can then read the coordinates from the two arrays afterwards...seems
pretty simple and efficient.
But not very good, I would say. You're taking a fundamental piece of
data, an (x,y) coordinate, and dividing it into two separate data
structures connected by an essentially meaningless counter variable.

typedef std::pair<int,intPoint;
std::list<PointallPoints;

or

std::vector<PointallPoints;

or even

std::set<PointallPoints;

makes a lot more sense to me.
Sep 19 '07 #6
"desktop" <as****@asd.comwrote in message
news:fc**********@news.net.uni-c.dk...
>I am simulating a display that consists of 20x20 pixels. All pixels are per
default white but I would like to be able to turn on some or all the
pixels.

My idea was to create a 3 dimensional array:

in a[][][]

where the first index is the potential numbers of pixels that I would like
to paint (20x20). The following two index should be the coordinates for
the pixels that should be painted. If I want to paint 3 pixels (2,4),
(17,9), (10,3) the following should be made:

a[0][2][4];
a[1][17][9];
a[2][10][3];

But when I declare a 3-dim array:

a[][][];
I get:

error: declaration of a as multidimensional array must have bounds for
all dimensions except the first

I have then tried:

a[20*20][20*20][20*20];

But is there not some way to accomplish my above 3 pixels without making
such a huge array?
I don't understand why you are trying to make such a huge array and what the
first element will be used for. An array of 20x20 elements would be:
int a[20][20];
each pixel containing an int. You could set that int to some value to
indicate if it's on or off or whatever. I would initialize them all to 0
first with:
int a[20][20] = {0};

Now if I wanted to paint (2,4) (17,9) (10,3) I would do something like:
a[2][4] = 1;
a[17][9] = 1;
a[10][3] = 1;
or whatever value I wanted for "on".

Now, please explain what the 1st element you used is, why would one pixel
need more than one int value?

An array
int a[20*20][20*20][20*20]
is acutally quite huge and you wouldn't use most of the elements as I see
it.

Either you don't have a clear understanding of arrays, or I dont' have a
clear understanding of what you are trying to achieve.
Sep 19 '07 #7
In article <fc**********@news.net.uni-c.dk>, as****@asd.com says...
I am simulating a display that consists of 20x20 pixels. All pixels are
per default white but I would like to be able to turn on some or all the
pixels.
It sounds to me like you really want some separate data structures. One
is the simulated screen:

bool screen[20][20]; // Apparently you only need black and white

The second is a set of coordinates for a single pixel:

struct point {
unsigned char x;
unsigned char y;
};

and the third is a vector of pixels that you want to display:

point display_list[] = {
{ 2, 4},
{ 17, 9 },
{ 10, 3 }
};

Then you can display those pixels pretty easily with code that steps
through the list, and for each pixel in the list, sets a pixel in the
simulated screen.

--
Later,
Jerry.

The universe is a figment of its own imagination.
Sep 19 '07 #8

Jerry Coffin wrote in message...
In article <fc**********@news.net.uni-c.dk>, as****@asd.com says...
I am simulating a display that consists of 20x20 pixels. All pixels are
per default white but I would like to be able to turn on some or all the
pixels.

It sounds to me like you really want some separate data structures. One
is the simulated screen:

bool screen[20][20]; // Apparently you only need black and white

The second is a set of coordinates for a single pixel:

struct point
unsigned char x;
unsigned char y;
};

and the third is a vector of pixels that you want to display:

point display_list[] = {
{ 2, 4},
{ 17, 9 },
{ 10, 3 }
};

Then you can display those pixels pretty easily with code that steps
through the list, and for each pixel in the list, sets a pixel in the
simulated screen.
Or, maybe (assuming black-n-white):

size_t const Sz(20);
std::vector<std::bitset<Sz Screen(Sz);

Screen.at( 2 ).set( 4 );
Screen[ 17 ].set( 9 );
Screen[ 10 ][ 3 ] = 1;
int pix = Screen[ 10 ][ 3 ];
Screen[ 10 ][ 2 ] = pix;
Screen.at( 0 ).set(); // turn on whole row
Screen.at( 0 ).reset(); // turn off whole row
Screen.at( 17 ).flip();
.....etc..
// 'print' the screen
for( size_t i(0); i < Screen.size(); ++i ){
std::cout<<Screen[ i ]<<std::endl;
}// for(i)

Only 'catch' is LSB is on right, MSB is on left in the bitset (opposite of
an array).

--
Bob R
POVrookie
Sep 19 '07 #9

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