By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
440,946 Members | 1,600 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 440,946 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

suppressing warnings in boost header files

P: n/a
Is there any way to selectively suppress compiler warnings from
designated header files (Ex: Boost header files) using gcc-3.3.1 on
Linux PC?
We tried using -Wno-system-headers option but it did not seem to solve
the problem.
Is there any way to designate system header files other than using
<>?

Thanks,
Bala

Jul 27 '07 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
3 Replies


P: n/a
us****@sta.samsung.com wrote:
Is there any way to selectively suppress compiler warnings from
designated header files (Ex: Boost header files) using gcc-3.3.1 on
Linux PC?
We tried using -Wno-system-headers option but it did not seem to solve
the problem.
Is there any way to designate system header files other than using
<>?
You should ask in <news:comp.lang.c++>, since Boost header files are C++.
Maybe also a gcc or Boost mailing list.

Jul 27 '07 #2

P: n/a
us****@sta.samsung.com wrote:
Is there any way to selectively suppress compiler warnings from
designated header files (Ex: Boost header files) using gcc-3.3.1 on
Linux PC?
We tried using -Wno-system-headers option but it did not seem to solve
the problem.
Is there any way to designate system header files other than using
<>?
Apologies for the previous reply. I did not see the headers. You've indeed
crossposted to comp.lang.c++ and gnu.gcc.help, among others.

Jul 27 '07 #3

P: n/a
us****@sta.samsung.com writes:
Is there any way to selectively suppress compiler warnings from
designated header files (Ex: Boost header files) using gcc-3.3.1 on
Linux PC?
We tried using -Wno-system-headers option but it did not seem to solve
the problem.
This is a question about gcc, not about either C or C++. Followups
redirected. (I dropped comp.sources.d as well.)
Is there any way to designate system header files other than using
<>?
You can usually use either
#include <header.h>
or
#include "header.h"

They differ in the way that the preprocessor searches for the file.
Unless you're intentionally replacing system headers (and if you do
that, you're on your own), you should use <>.

Why do you want to use something other than <>? What problem are you
trying to solve?

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <* <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
"We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
-- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
Jul 27 '07 #4

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.