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How can I improve my C++?

P: n/a
Hi,
now I've known the basics about C++. What I can do is pretty limited.
I've known something in Java:
1.Networking(Socket, RMI, Servlet)
2.Database(JDBC)
3.GUI (Java Swing)
4.and some others APIs...
I'm wondering how can I do all of the above in C++.
And I've heard that reading source codes can help one
improve its programming skills, but I don't know how to
read them.
Please help me! Thank you!
Jun 17 '07 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
tony wrote:
Hi,
now I've known the basics about C++. What I can do is pretty limited.
I've known something in Java:
1.Networking(Socket, RMI, Servlet)
2.Database(JDBC)
3.GUI (Java Swing)
4.and some others APIs...
I'm wondering how can I do all of the above in C++.
And I've heard that reading source codes can help one
improve its programming skills, but I don't know how to
read them.
Please help me! Thank you!
Well the big difference between Java and C++ is that Java is paltform
independent and C++ isn't (or, as they say, Java is a platform). All of
those things can be done in C++ but they would be done differently if
you were programming Windows, Linux or whatever.

So the best thing is to decide what platofrm you want to program for,
and then take your question to the appropriate group.

comp.os.linux.deveopment.apps or comp.os.ms-windows.programmer.win32

for instance.

I would have thought that reading books would help more than reading
source code, but perhaps that is just me.

john
Jun 17 '07 #2

P: n/a
On Jun 17, 5:31 pm, tony <tonywinslow1...@gmail.comwrote:
Hi,
now I've known the basics about C++. What I can do is pretty limited.
I've known something in Java:
1.Networking(Socket, RMI, Servlet)
2.Database(JDBC)
3.GUI (Java Swing)
4.and some others APIs...
I'm wondering how can I do all of the above in C++.
And I've heard that reading source codes can help one
improve its programming skills, but I don't know how to
read them.
Please help me! Thank you!
The difference with Java is that you're given all of these API's as
part of Java itself, whereas in C++ you have various different
libraries to achieve these things. I'm from Java myself (er sounds
like a planet...) and plan to use WxWidgets, although I'm told it's a
very Java-like library, but I didn't have much choice. I wanted to use
Sockets and Threads using VS 2005 Express (no MFC...) and it seems to
have a good reputation.

If you have money to burn you might try MFC and other MS
libraries, .NET is very similar to Java, but covers more languages.
Although NET C++ is managed so it's not "real" C++. There are other
libraries like Qt and the like, I'm sure there are tons of open source
ones to choose from for GCC (can run on Win and Linux).

Gordy

Jun 17 '07 #3

P: n/a
John Harrison wrote:
tony wrote:
>Hi,
now I've known the basics about C++. What I can do is pretty limited.
I've known something in Java:
1.Networking(Socket, RMI, Servlet)
2.Database(JDBC)
3.GUI (Java Swing)
4.and some others APIs...
I'm wondering how can I do all of the above in C++.
And I've heard that reading source codes can help one
improve its programming skills, but I don't know how to
read them.
Please help me! Thank you!

Well the big difference between Java and C++ is that Java is paltform
independent and C++ isn't (or, as they say, Java is a platform). All of
those things can be done in C++ but they would be done differently if
you were programming Windows, Linux or whatever.
I think I would like to programme on Linux.
So the best thing is to decide what platofrm you want to program for,
and then take your question to the appropriate group.

comp.os.linux.deveopment.apps or comp.os.ms-windows.programmer.win32

for instance.

I would have thought that reading books would help more than reading
source code, but perhaps that is just me.

john
Actually, I don't know what books are good and suitable for me to read.
Do you have any suggestions?
Jun 17 '07 #4

P: n/a
>
Actually, I don't know what books are good and suitable for me to read.
Do you have any suggestions?
Without knowing more your current knowledge and what you're looking for
it's hard to be sure.

But you say you know the basics of C++, when I was in that position I
found the 'Effective' books by Scott Meyers extremely useful. In fact
say I'd those books taught me more C++ than anything else I've read.

'Effective C++' and 'More Effective C++' by Scott Meyers.

john
Jun 17 '07 #5

P: n/a
On Jun 17, 8:06 am, John Harrison <john_androni...@hotmail.comwrote:
tony wrote:
now I've known the basics about C++. What I can do is pretty limited.
I've known something in Java:
1.Networking(Socket, RMI, Servlet)
2.Database(JDBC)
3.GUI (Java Swing)
4.and some others APIs...
I'm wondering how can I do all of the above in C++.
And I've heard that reading source codes can help one
improve its programming skills, but I don't know how to
read them.
Well the big difference between Java and C++ is that Java is paltform
independent and C++ isn't (or, as they say, Java is a platform). All of
those things can be done in C++ but they would be done differently if
you were programming Windows, Linux or whatever.
Not completely. The real difference is that Java provides
standard libraries for all of these things, where as in C++, you
need third party libraries. If I had to do a GUI in C++, for
example, I certainly wouldn't program Windows or X specific; I'd
use wxWidgets, or something along those lines.

--
James Kanze (Gabi Software) email: ja*********@gmail.com
Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34

Jun 17 '07 #6

P: n/a
John Harrison wrote:

>
'Effective C++' and 'More Effective C++' by Scott Meyers.
Just a clarification here please. One should read both of them
or just one of them? 'More Effective C++' is the sequel of 'Effective C++'
or is just the improved version?
Jun 17 '07 #7

P: n/a
In article <f5***********@ulysses.noc.ntua.gr>, vo***@booho.com says...
John Harrison wrote:


'Effective C++' and 'More Effective C++' by Scott Meyers.

Just a clarification here please. One should read both of them
or just one of them? 'More Effective C++' is the sequel of 'Effective C++'
or is just the improved version?
It's a sequel. The "improved version" is the third edition of _Effective
C++_.

--
Later,
Jerry.

The universe is a figment of its own imagination.
Jun 17 '07 #8

P: n/a
John Harrison wrote:
>>
Actually, I don't know what books are good and suitable for me to read.
Do you have any suggestions?

Without knowing more your current knowledge and what you're looking for
it's hard to be sure.

But you say you know the basics of C++, when I was in that position I
found the 'Effective' books by Scott Meyers extremely useful. In fact
say I'd those books taught me more C++ than anything else I've read.

'Effective C++' and 'More Effective C++' by Scott Meyers.

john
Thank you for your advice!

Tony
Jun 18 '07 #9

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