By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
446,409 Members | 940 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 446,409 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

C

P: n/a
Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as queréis que sea
Jun 4 '07 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
56 Replies


P: n/a
On Jun 4, 2:14 pm, "cesarcp" <cesa...@mundo-r.comwrote:
Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as queréis que sea

Please use statdard US English with is global language.
Your ^&$&*($&*&%(_+ is not understandable to us.

Bye

Jun 5 '07 #2

P: n/a
In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>, Guru
Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrites
>On Jun 4, 2:14 pm, "cesarcp" <cesa...@mundo-r.comwrote:
>Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as queréis que sea


Please use statdard US English with is global language
No it is NOT. US English is used in the US. There are in fact 6
version of English in use in the world. British English being the most
widely used.

>Your ^&$&*($&*&%(_+ is not understandable to us.
Bye
Not at all.... it is not understood by YOU which is not the same.

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ ch***@phaedsys.org www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

Jun 5 '07 #3

P: n/a
"Chris Hills" writes:
In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>, Guru
Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrites
>>On Jun 4, 2:14 pm, "cesarcp" <cesa...@mundo-r.comwrote:
>>Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as queréis que sea


Please use statdard US English with is global language

No it is NOT. US English is used in the US. There are in fact 6 version
of English in use in the world. British English being the most widely
used.
I think he meant to say

"Please use [standard] US English [which] is [a] global language."
Jun 5 '07 #4

P: n/a
Chris Hills said:
In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>,
Guru Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrites
>>On Jun 4, 2:14 pm, "cesarcp" <cesa...@mundo-r.comwrote:
>>Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as queréis que sea


Please use statdard US English with is global language

No it is NOT. US English is used in the US. There are in fact 6
version of English in use in the world.
6, for certain values of 6.

BBC English, Zummerzet, Scouse, Geordie, Black Country, Yorkshire
(except Sheffield), Sheffield, to name but seven. I'm sure there are
plenty more where those came from (or rather, from other places
nearby).
British English being the most widely used.
We don't put our name on our stamps. I see no reason why we need to
qualify the name of our language, especially since the name is
/already/ there. You wouldn't catch the Spaniards saying "Iberian
Spanish" or the Italians saying "Mediterranean Italian".

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Jun 5 '07 #5

P: n/a
In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>,
Guru Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrote:
>
Please use statdard US English with is global language.
Is this irony?

-- Richard
--
"Consideration shall be given to the need for as many as 32 characters
in some alphabets" - X3.4, 1963.
Jun 5 '07 #6

P: n/a
Richard Tobin wrote:
In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>,
Guru Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrote:
>Please use statdard US English with is global language.

Is this irony?

-- Richard
No, it is what many U.S. citizens actually believe.

Jun 5 '07 #7

P: n/a
jacob navia said:
Richard Tobin wrote:
>In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>,
Guru Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrote:
>>Please use statdard US English with is global language.

Is this irony?

No, it is what many U.S. citizens actually believe.
Yes, but then many U.S. citizens also believe that Elvis lives, that
Nixon was framed, and that the edges of the world are called Florida,
California, and Canada.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Jun 5 '07 #8

P: n/a
In article <jq******************************@bt.com>,
Richard Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrote:
>jacob navia said:
>Richard Tobin wrote:
>>In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>,
Guru Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrote:
Please use statdard US English with is global language.

Is this irony?

No, it is what many U.S. citizens actually believe.

Yes, but then many U.S. citizens also believe that Elvis lives, that
Nixon was framed, and that the edges of the world are called Florida,
California, and Canada.
44% of Americans believe that Jesus is coming back to Earth sometime in
the next 50 years. Half of them are absolutely certain of this; the
other half only "pretty sure".
Jun 5 '07 #9

P: n/a
In article <14*********************@bt.com>, Richard Heathfield
<rj*@see.sig.invalidwrites
>Chris Hills said:
>In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>,
Guru Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrites
>>>On Jun 4, 2:14 pm, "cesarcp" <cesa...@mundo-r.comwrote:
Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as queréis que sea
Please use statdard US English with is global language

No it is NOT. US English is used in the US. There are in fact 6
version of English in use in the world.

6, for certain values of 6.

BBC English, Zummerzet, Scouse, Geordie, Black Country, Yorkshire
(except Sheffield), Sheffield, to name but seven. I'm sure there are
plenty more where those came from (or rather, from other places
nearby).
I was told there are officially 6 official versions of English by a
Proff of English (an American teaching in Spain :-) Within each version
there are many dialects.
>British English being the most widely used.

We don't put our name on our stamps. I see no reason why we need to
qualify the name of our language, especially since the name is
/already/ there. You wouldn't catch the Spaniards saying "Iberian
Spanish"
It is not Iberian Spanish but Castillian Spanish.. As opposed to the
other versions used in Spain There is Spanish and Spanish
--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ ch***@phaedsys.org www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

Jun 5 '07 #10

P: n/a
In article <46**********************@news.orange.fr>, jacob navia
<ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrites
>Richard Tobin wrote:
>In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>,
Guru Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrote:
>>Please use statdard US English with is global language.
Is this irony?
-- Richard

No, it is what many U.S. citizens actually believe.
Not the first time the US population has been wrong...

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ ch***@phaedsys.org www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

Jun 5 '07 #11

P: n/a
jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrites:
Richard Tobin wrote:
>In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>,
Guru Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrote:
>>Please use statdard US English with is global language.

Is this irony?

-- Richard

No, it is what many U.S. citizens actually believe.
No. That is a "whoosh" :)
Jun 5 '07 #12

P: n/a
In article <jq******************************@bt.com>, Richard Heathfield
<rj*@see.sig.invalidwrites
>jacob navia said:
>Richard Tobin wrote:
>>In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>,
Guru Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrote:
Please use statdard US English with is global language.

Is this irony?

No, it is what many U.S. citizens actually believe.

Yes, but then many U.S. citizens also believe that Elvis lives,
True (works with James Dean in the CIA)
that
Nixon was framed,
He was by Elvis and James Dean working for the CIA....
>and that the edges of the world are called Florida,
California, and Canada.
I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US and
Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole world cried
foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal) wall and Canada who
said Every country should have a wall on it's Southern border :-)

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ ch***@phaedsys.org www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

Jun 5 '07 #13

P: n/a
Chris Hills wrote:
I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US and
Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole world cried
foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal) wall and Canada who
said Every country should have a wall on it's Southern border :-)
If a political firestorm sweeps here subsequently, I shall be looking to
/you/ as the person with the match, smiley or no ifing smiley.

--
"If there is a problem, you must confess it, Mr Chaplin"/The Beiderbeck Affair/

Hewlett-Packard Limited registered office: Cain Road, Bracknell,
registered no: 690597 England Berks RG12 1HN

Jun 5 '07 #14

P: n/a
Chris Hills wrote, On 05/06/07 14:06:
In article <jq******************************@bt.com>, Richard Heathfield
<snip>
>and that the edges of the world are called Florida,
California, and Canada.

I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US and
Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole world cried
foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal) wall and Canada who
said Every country should have a wall on it's Southern border :-)
The Scottish already have one, it just needs repairing. Admittedly the
border has moved since it was built.
--
Flash Gordon
Jun 5 '07 #15

P: n/a
In article <ch************@news.flash-gordon.me.uk>,
Flash Gordon <sp**@flash-gordon.me.ukwrote:
>The Scottish already have one, it just needs repairing. Admittedly the
border has moved since it was built.
We have two; the current border is between them.

The less well-known is the Antonine Wall, see

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonine_Wall

-- Richard
--
"Consideration shall be given to the need for as many as 32 characters
in some alphabets" - X3.4, 1963.
Jun 5 '07 #16

P: n/a
In article <ch************@news.flash-gordon.me.uk>, Flash Gordon
<sp**@flash-gordon.me.ukwrites
>Chris Hills wrote, On 05/06/07 14:06:
>In article <jq******************************@bt.com>, Richard
Heathfield

<snip>
>>and that the edges of the world are called Florida,
California, and Canada.
I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US
and Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole world
cried foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal) wall and
Canada who said Every country should have a wall on it's Southern border :-)

The Scottish already have one, it just needs repairing. Admittedly the
border has moved since it was built.
I would repair both.... Hadrians and Antoine's and make it a free fire
zone in between.

We can play foot ball between the two at Christmas :-)

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ ch***@phaedsys.org www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

Jun 5 '07 #17

P: n/a
In article <f4**********@murdoch.hpl.hp.com>, Chris Dollin
<ch**********@hp.comwrites
>Chris Hills wrote:
>I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US and
Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole world cried
foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal) wall and Canada who
said Every country should have a wall on it's Southern border :-)

If a political firestorm sweeps here subsequently, I shall be looking to
/you/ as the person with the match, smiley or no ifing smiley.
Well the Canadians said it with a smile and then thought again.....
apparently they have started surveying :-)

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ ch***@phaedsys.org www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

Jun 5 '07 #18

P: n/a
In article <f4***********@pc-news.cogsci.ed.ac.uk>, Richard Tobin
<ri*****@cogsci.ed.ac.ukwrites
>In article <ch************@news.flash-gordon.me.uk>,
Flash Gordon <sp**@flash-gordon.me.ukwrote:
>>The Scottish already have one, it just needs repairing. Admittedly the
border has moved since it was built.

We have two; the current border is between them.

The less well-known is the Antonine Wall, see

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonine_Wall

-- Richard
See my other post for suggestions of the border :-)

It is interesting that BOTH sides equally argue for extending it or
removing it as a border....
--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ ch***@phaedsys.org www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

Jun 5 '07 #19

P: n/a
"Chris Hills" writes:
No it is NOT. US English is used in the US. There are in fact 6 version
of English in use in the world. British English being the most widely
used.
I can't help noticing that British English likes to name things for what
they are not, rather than what they are. For example, "wireless" and
"horseless carriage". If they had been put in charge I expect we would be
talking about "gearless calculators" instead of computers.

I wonder what the six varieties of English are. I come up with:

British English
Indian English
Australian English
US English
Canadian English.

But I can't come up with a sixth. I would be comfortable if US and Canadian
were lumped into "North American English" if someone can come up with two
varieties not mentioned above.
Jun 5 '07 #20

P: n/a
In article <14*********************@bt.com>,
Richard Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrote:
>Chris Hills said:
>British English being the most widely used.

We don't put our name on our stamps. I see no reason why we need to
qualify the name of our language, especially since the name is
/already/ there. You wouldn't catch the Spaniards saying "Iberian
Spanish" or the Italians saying "Mediterranean Italian".
English (the language) is used widely enough, and exists in enough
different dialects, that a qualifier specifying which of those dialects
is being referred to is probably appropriate, even for English (the
nationality) English (the language) speakers.

Referring to the different variations as "American", "Australian",
"British", "Canadian", and "International" (and also a few that I'm
missing), without using "English" to identify the language group,
is probably also inappropriate - the various dialects haven't really
diverged enough to be considered different languages.

(Unless, of course, you're going to use the definition of "language" as
"a dialect with an army"; by that definition most of them are...)
dave

--
Dave Vandervies dj******@csclub.uwaterloo.ca
In fact, I go to considerable lengths to maintain the self-imposed delusion
that I live in a fantasy world, one in which software is easy and fun to write,
and works right the first time --Steve Summit in comp.lang.c
Jun 5 '07 #21

P: n/a

"osmium" <r1********@comcast.netschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:5c*************@mid.individual.net...
"Chris Hills" writes:
>No it is NOT. US English is used in the US. There are in fact 6 version
of English in use in the world. British English being the most widely
used.

I can't help noticing that British English likes to name things for what
they are not, rather than what they are. For example, "wireless" and
"horseless carriage". If they had been put in charge I expect we would be
talking about "gearless calculators" instead of computers.

I wonder what the six varieties of English are. I come up with:

British English
Indian English
Australian English
US English
Canadian English.

But I can't come up with a sixth. I would be comfortable if US and
Canadian were lumped into "North American English" if someone can come up
with two varieties not mentioned above.
The Canadians probably object to that...

Bye, Jojo
Jun 5 '07 #22

P: n/a
In article <f4**********@online.de>,
Joachim Schmitz <jo**@schmitz-digital.dewrote:
>
"osmium" <r1********@comcast.netschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:5c*************@mid.individual.net...
>I wonder what the six varieties of English are. I come up with:

British English
Indian English
Australian English
US English
Canadian English.

But I can't come up with a sixth. I would be comfortable if US and
Canadian were lumped into "North American English" if someone can come up
with two varieties not mentioned above.
The Canadians probably object to that...
Well, obviously.

There's probably at least as much variation within both languages
as there is between them, but I've been told that it's quite easy to
classify North-Americans into Canadians and Americans based mostly on
their language.
dave
(probably couldn't do it myself, though)

--
Dave Vandervies dj******@csclub.uwaterloo.ca
In fact, I go to considerable lengths to maintain the self-imposed delusion
that I live in a fantasy world, one in which software is easy and fun to write,
and works right the first time --Steve Summit in comp.lang.c
Jun 5 '07 #23

P: n/a
In article <5c*************@mid.individual.net>, osmium
<r1********@comcast.netwrites
>"Chris Hills" writes:
>No it is NOT. US English is used in the US. There are in fact 6 version
of English in use in the world. British English being the most widely
used.

I can't help noticing that British English likes to name things for what
they are not, rather than what they are. For example, "wireless" and
"horseless carriage". If they had been put in charge I expect we would be
talking about "gearless calculators" instead of computers.

I wonder what the six varieties of English are. I come up with:

British English
Indian English
Australian English
US English
Canadian English.
South African

I am not sure if Canadian and US were lumped together.

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ ch***@phaedsys.org www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

Jun 5 '07 #24

P: n/a
"Dave Vandervies" <dj******@csclub.uwaterloo.caschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:f4**********@rumours.uwaterloo.ca...
In article <f4**********@online.de>,
Joachim Schmitz <jo**@schmitz-digital.dewrote:
>>
"osmium" <r1********@comcast.netschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:5c*************@mid.individual.net...
>>I wonder what the six varieties of English are. I come up with:

British English
Indian English
Australian English
US English
Canadian English.

But I can't come up with a sixth. I would be comfortable if US and
Canadian were lumped into "North American English" if someone can come
up
with two varieties not mentioned above.
The Canadians probably object to that...

Well, obviously.

There's probably at least as much variation within both languages
as there is between them, but I've been told that it's quite easy to
classify North-Americans into Canadians and Americans based mostly on
their language.
Esp. if they are Franco-Canadians 8-)
(probably couldn't do it myself, though)
Easy: let them spell wiskey or colour. As far as I know Canadians spell it
the British way.

Hold on: you should know, posting from a Canadain account, shouldn't you?
Jun 5 '07 #25

P: n/a
In article <f4**********@online.de>,
Joachim Schmitz <jo**@schmitz-digital.dewrote:
>Easy: let them spell wiskey or colour. As far as I know Canadians spell it
the British way.
[OT]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whiskey

does not reflect anyone at all spelling it "wiskey".
--
If you lie to the compiler, it will get its revenge. -- Henry Spencer
Jun 5 '07 #26

P: n/a
On Tue, 05 Jun 2007 15:28:28 +0100, in comp.lang.c , Flash Gordon
<sp**@flash-gordon.me.ukwrote:
>Chris Hills wrote, On 05/06/07 14:06:
>In article <jq******************************@bt.com>, Richard Heathfield

<snip>
>>and that the edges of the world are called Florida,
California, and Canada.

I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US and
Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole world cried
foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal) wall and Canada who
said Every country should have a wall on it's Southern border :-)

The Scottish already have one, it just needs repairing. Admittedly the
border has moved since it was built.
This isn't a problem - we're quite happy to move it back southwards
again....
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Jun 5 '07 #27

P: n/a
On 5 Jun 2007 14:59:54 GMT, in comp.lang.c , ri*****@cogsci.ed.ac.uk
(Richard Tobin) wrote:
>In article <ch************@news.flash-gordon.me.uk>,
Flash Gordon <sp**@flash-gordon.me.ukwrote:
>>The Scottish already have one, it just needs repairing. Admittedly the
border has moved since it was built.

We have two; the current border is between them.

The less well-known is the Antonine Wall,
and I have very fond memories of walking along it, near Bonnybridge,
when I was a lad.
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Jun 5 '07 #28

P: n/a
On Tue, 5 Jun 2007 08:37:34 -0700, in comp.lang.c , "osmium"
<r1********@comcast.netwrote:
>"Chris Hills" writes:
>No it is NOT. US English is used in the US. There are in fact 6 version
of English in use in the world. British English being the most widely
used.

I can't help noticing that British English likes to name things for what
they are not, rather than what they are. For example, "wireless" and
"horseless carriage". If they had been put in charge I expect we would be
talking about "gearless calculators" instead of computers.
Difference engine perhaps?
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Jun 5 '07 #29

P: n/a
In article <7i********************************@4ax.com>,
Mark McIntyre <ma**********@spamcop.netwrote:
>>The Scottish already have one, it just needs repairing. Admittedly the
border has moved since it was built.
>This isn't a problem - we're quite happy to move it back southwards
again....
Which would have the pleasant side effect of reducing the porportion
in favour of Scottish independence. In fact, we could just move it
down to the South coast.

-- Richard
--
"Consideration shall be given to the need for as many as 32 characters
in some alphabets" - X3.4, 1963.
Jun 5 '07 #30

P: n/a
Kenny McCormack wrote:
>
In article <jq******************************@bt.com>,
Richard Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrote:
jacob navia said:
Richard Tobin wrote:
In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>,
Guru Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrote:
Please use statdard US English with is global language.

Is this irony?

No, it is what many U.S. citizens actually believe.
Yes, but then many U.S. citizens also believe that Elvis lives, that
Nixon was framed, and that the edges of the world are called Florida,
California, and Canada.

44% of Americans believe that Jesus is coming back to Earth sometime in
the next 50 years. Half of them are absolutely certain of this; the
other half only "pretty sure".
Four out of five dentists recommend sugarless gum for those patients
who chew gum.

--
+-------------------------+--------------------+-----------------------+
| Kenneth J. Brody | www.hvcomputer.com | #include |
| kenbrody/at\spamcop.net | www.fptech.com | <std_disclaimer.h|
+-------------------------+--------------------+-----------------------+
Don't e-mail me at: <mailto:Th*************@gmail.com>
Jun 5 '07 #31

P: n/a
Chris Hills wrote:
[...]
I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US and
Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole world cried
foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal) wall and Canada who
said Every country should have a wall on it's Southern border :-)
Excuse me, but "the US" said no such thing. Some people at/near the
top of the federal government may have said so, but that's not the
same thing.

--
+-------------------------+--------------------+-----------------------+
| Kenneth J. Brody | www.hvcomputer.com | #include |
| kenbrody/at\spamcop.net | www.fptech.com | <std_disclaimer.h|
+-------------------------+--------------------+-----------------------+
Don't e-mail me at: <mailto:Th*************@gmail.com>

Jun 5 '07 #32

P: n/a
"Walter Roberson" <ro******@ibd.nrc-cnrc.gc.caschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:f4**********@canopus.cc.umanitoba.ca...
In article <f4**********@online.de>,
Joachim Schmitz <jo**@schmitz-digital.dewrote:
>>Easy: let them spell wiskey or colour. As far as I know Canadians spell it
the British way.

[OT]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whiskey

does not reflect anyone at all spelling it "wiskey".
Yeah, yeah... seems my spellchecker failed on me.

Bye, Jojo
Jun 5 '07 #33

P: n/a
In article <f4**********@online.de>, Joachim Schmitz
<no*********@schmitz-digital.dewrites
>"Dave Vandervies" <dj******@csclub.uwaterloo.caschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:f4**********@rumours.uwaterloo.ca...
>In article <f4**********@online.de>,
Joachim Schmitz <jo**@schmitz-digital.dewrote:
>>>
"osmium" <r1********@comcast.netschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:5c*************@mid.individual.net...
>>>I wonder what the six varieties of English are. I come up with:

British English
Indian English
Australian English
US English
Canadian English.

But I can't come up with a sixth. I would be comfortable if US and
Canadian were lumped into "North American English" if someone can come
up
with two varieties not mentioned above.
The Canadians probably object to that...

Well, obviously.

There's probably at least as much variation within both languages
as there is between them, but I've been told that it's quite easy to
classify North-Americans into Canadians and Americans based mostly on
their language.
Esp. if they are Franco-Canadians 8-)
>(probably couldn't do it myself, though)
Easy: let them spell wiskey
Which one... Scottish or Irish?
--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ ch***@phaedsys.org www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

Jun 5 '07 #34

P: n/a
In article <f4**********@online.de>,
Joachim Schmitz <jo**@schmitz-digital.dewrote:
>"Dave Vandervies" <dj******@csclub.uwaterloo.caschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:f4**********@rumours.uwaterloo.ca...
[distinguishing Canadians from Americans based on language]
>(probably couldn't do it myself, though)
Easy: let them spell wiskey or colour. As far as I know Canadians spell it
the British way.
As far as I know, whether it's "whiskey" or "whisky" depends on where
it was made, not on the nationality of the person writing it.
(Crown Royal is whisky. Jack Daniel's is whiskey.)

For "...or" vs. "...our", if you see both in the same sentence, it was
probably written by a Canadian. If you only see "...our", it was almost
definitely written by a Canadian (or somebody from a different continent).

>Hold on: you should know, posting from a Canadain account, shouldn't you?
Pretty much. It's not something I've paid enough attention to to pick
up on without looking for it, but if I had some time to think about
it I could probably tell the difference between the two without too
much trouble.
dave

--
Dave Vandervies dj******@csclub.uwaterloo.ca
In fact, I go to considerable lengths to maintain the self-imposed delusion
that I live in a fantasy world, one in which software is easy and fun to write,
and works right the first time --Steve Summit in comp.lang.c
Jun 5 '07 #35

P: n/a
"Chris Hills" <ch***@phaedsys.orgschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:c4**************@phaedsys.demon.co.uk...
In article <f4**********@online.de>, Joachim Schmitz
<no*********@schmitz-digital.dewrites
>>"Dave Vandervies" <dj******@csclub.uwaterloo.caschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:f4**********@rumours.uwaterloo.ca...
>>In article <f4**********@online.de>,
Joachim Schmitz <jo**@schmitz-digital.dewrote:

"osmium" <r1********@comcast.netschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:5c*************@mid.individual.net...

I wonder what the six varieties of English are. I come up with:
>
British English
Indian English
Australian English
US English
Canadian English.
>
But I can't come up with a sixth. I would be comfortable if US and
Canadian were lumped into "North American English" if someone can come
up
with two varieties not mentioned above.
The Canadians probably object to that...

Well, obviously.

There's probably at least as much variation within both languages
as there is between them, but I've been told that it's quite easy to
classify North-Americans into Canadians and Americans based mostly on
their language.
Esp. if they are Franco-Canadians 8-)
>>(probably couldn't do it myself, though)
Easy: let them spell wiskey
Which one... Scottish or Irish?
Any of them spelled my way? 8-)
Jun 5 '07 #36

P: n/a
osmium wrote:
"Chris Hills" writes:
>In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>, Guru
Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrites
>>On Jun 4, 2:14 pm, "cesarcp" <cesa...@mundo-r.comwrote:
Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as queréis que sea

Please use statdard US English with is global language
No it is NOT. US English is used in the US. There are in fact 6 version
of English in use in the world. British English being the most widely
used.

I think he meant to say

"Please use [standard] US English [which] is [a] global language."
Which is ironic, given that we recognized the posting as "English", and
yet the meaning was barely more understandable (to me) than the OP.
--
clvrmnky <mailto:sp******@clevermonkey.org>

Direct replies will be blacklisted. Replace "spamtrap" with my name to
contact me directly.
Jun 5 '07 #37

P: n/a
Chris Hills wrote:
In article <14*********************@bt.com>, Richard Heathfield
<rj*@see.sig.invalidwrites
>Chris Hills said:
>>In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>,
Guru Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrites
On Jun 4, 2:14 pm, "cesarcp" <cesa...@mundo-r.comwrote:
Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as queréis que sea
Please use statdard US English with is global language

No it is NOT. US English is used in the US. There are in fact 6
version of English in use in the world.

6, for certain values of 6.

BBC English, Zummerzet, Scouse, Geordie, Black Country, Yorkshire
(except Sheffield), Sheffield, to name but seven. I'm sure there are
plenty more where those came from (or rather, from other places
nearby).

I was told there are officially 6 official versions of English by a
Proff of English (an American teaching in Spain :-) Within each version
there are many dialects.
>>British English being the most widely used.

We don't put our name on our stamps. I see no reason why we need to
qualify the name of our language, especially since the name is
/already/ there. You wouldn't catch the Spaniards saying "Iberian
Spanish"

It is not Iberian Spanish but Castillian Spanish.. As opposed to the
other versions used in Spain There is Spanish and Spanish
Actually, before Spanish was rationalized (for courtly speakers) c. the
time of a Queen Isabella, this was pretty much the case
--
clvrmnky <mailto:sp******@clevermonkey.org>

Direct replies will be blacklisted. Replace "spamtrap" with my name to
contact me directly.
Jun 5 '07 #38

P: n/a
osmium said:

<snip>
I wonder what the six varieties of English are. I come up with:

British English
Indian English
Australian English
US English
Canadian English.

But I can't come up with a sixth.
You missed "English", which is a language spoken by a great many English
people. I'm not familiar, however, with "British English".

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Jun 5 '07 #39

P: n/a
Dave Vandervies said:

<snip>
English (the language) is used widely enough, and exists in enough
different dialects, that a qualifier specifying which of those
dialects is being referred to is probably appropriate, even for
English (the nationality) English (the language) speakers.
I was with you all the way, Dave, right up until "even for".

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Jun 5 '07 #40

P: n/a
Guru Jois wrote:
Please use statdard US English with is global language.
That loosely translates to:

"oh them words... I can't understand them... They scare me... Mommy?"
Rui Maciel
Jun 5 '07 #41

P: n/a
Guru Jois wrote:
Please use statdard US English with is global language.
That loosely translates to:

"oh them words... I can't understand them... They scare me... Mommy?"
Rui Maciel
Jun 5 '07 #42

P: n/a
In article <11**********************@i13g2000prf.googlegroups .com>,
Guru Jois <gu*******@gmail.comwrote:
>On Jun 4, 2:14 pm, "cesarcp" <cesa...@mundo-r.comwrote:
>Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as quer=E9is que sea
>Please use statdard US English with is global language.
Your ^&$&*($&*&%(_+ is not understandable to us.
This is an international newsgroup, and nothing in its original statement
of purpose restricts it to English (any variety of English.)

Posters are merely advised that English (as a class) is the
language most likely to be understood by a wide variety of the
readers, so if they wish to obtain the best possible answers,
that posting in English is probably best.
Checking with google's translation tools, it appears that the
poster did not actually ask a question. Looks like the
translation is roughly "This is not going to be what some of you
expect to see."
--
"law -- it's a commodity"
-- Andrew Ryan (The Globe and Mail, 2005/11/26)
Jun 5 '07 #43

P: n/a
In article <f4**********@online.de>, Joachim Schmitz
<no*********@schmitz-digital.dewrites
>"Chris Hills" <ch***@phaedsys.orgschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:c4**************@phaedsys.demon.co.uk...
>In article <f4**********@online.de>, Joachim Schmitz
<no*********@schmitz-digital.dewrites
>>>"Dave Vandervies" <dj******@csclub.uwaterloo.caschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:f4**********@rumours.uwaterloo.ca...
In article <f4**********@online.de>,
Joachim Schmitz <jo**@schmitz-digital.dewrote:
>
>"osmium" <r1********@comcast.netschrieb im Newsbeitrag
>news:5c*************@mid.individual.net...

>I wonder what the six varieties of English are. I come up with:
>>
>British English
>Indian English
>Australian English
>US English
>Canadian English.
>>
>But I can't come up with a sixth. I would be comfortable if US and
>Canadian were lumped into "North American English" if someone can come
>up
>with two varieties not mentioned above.
>The Canadians probably object to that...

Well, obviously.

There's probably at least as much variation within both languages
as there is between them, but I've been told that it's quite easy to
classify North-Americans into Canadians and Americans based mostly on
their language.
Esp. if they are Franco-Canadians 8-)

(probably couldn't do it myself, though)
Easy: let them spell wiskey
Which one... Scottish or Irish?
Any of them spelled my way? 8-)
There are two drinks Whisky and Whiskey one is Irish and one Scottish.
It matters not if they are American or Canadian the spelling depends on
which you are referring to.
--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ ch***@phaedsys.org www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

Jun 5 '07 #44

P: n/a
In article <46***************@spamcop.net>, Kenneth Brody
<ke******@spamcop.netwrites
>Chris Hills wrote:
[...]
>I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US and
Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole world cried
foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal) wall and Canada who
said Every country should have a wall on it's Southern border :-)

Excuse me, but "the US" said no such thing. Some people at/near the
top of the federal government may have said so, but that's not the
same thing.
The democratically elected Government speaks "on behalf of the people"
whether or not you happen to agree with them and god knows I don't agree
with the clown we have speaking on behalf of the UK

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ ch***@phaedsys.org www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

Jun 5 '07 #45

P: n/a
"Chris Hills" <ch***@phaedsys.orgschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:5b**************@phaedsys.demon.co.uk...
In article <f4**********@online.de>, Joachim Schmitz
<no*********@schmitz-digital.dewrites
>>"Chris Hills" <ch***@phaedsys.orgschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:c4**************@phaedsys.demon.co.uk...
>>In article <f4**********@online.de>, Joachim Schmitz
<no*********@schmitz-digital.dewrites
"Dave Vandervies" <dj******@csclub.uwaterloo.caschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:f4**********@rumours.uwaterloo.ca...
In article <f4**********@online.de>,
Joachim Schmitz <jo**@schmitz-digital.dewrote:
>>
>>"osmium" <r1********@comcast.netschrieb im Newsbeitrag
>>news:5c*************@mid.individual.net...
>
>>I wonder what the six varieties of English are. I come up with:
>>>
>>British English
>>Indian English
>>Australian English
>>US English
>>Canadian English.
>>>
>>But I can't come up with a sixth. I would be comfortable if US and
>>Canadian were lumped into "North American English" if someone can
>>come
>>up
>>with two varieties not mentioned above.
>>The Canadians probably object to that...
>
Well, obviously.
>
There's probably at least as much variation within both languages
as there is between them, but I've been told that it's quite easy to
classify North-Americans into Canadians and Americans based mostly on
their language.
Esp. if they are Franco-Canadians 8-)

(probably couldn't do it myself, though)
Easy: let them spell wiskey
Which one... Scottish or Irish?
Any of them spelled my way? 8-)

There are two drinks Whisky and Whiskey one is Irish and one Scottish. It
matters not if they are American or Canadian the spelling depends on which
you are referring to.
OK, fine, but now go back and read how I spelled it...
Jun 5 '07 #46

P: n/a
On 5 Jun 2007 16:40:57 GMT, in comp.lang.c , ri*****@cogsci.ed.ac.uk
(Richard Tobin) wrote:
>In article <7i********************************@4ax.com>,
Mark McIntyre <ma**********@spamcop.netwrote:
>>>The Scottish already have one, it just needs repairing. Admittedly the
border has moved since it was built.
>>This isn't a problem - we're quite happy to move it back southwards
again....

Which would have the pleasant side effect of reducing the porportion
in favour of Scottish independence. In fact, we could just move it
down to the South coast.
I reckon that would probably /increase/ it - after all, Surrey would
then be governed by Holyrood...
gd&r
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Jun 5 '07 #47

P: n/a
On Tue, 5 Jun 2007 19:09:45 +0200, in comp.lang.c , "Joachim Schmitz"
<no*********@schmitz-digital.dewrote:
>"Chris Hills" <ch***@phaedsys.orgschrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:c4**************@phaedsys.demon.co.uk...
>In article <f4**********@online.de>, Joachim Schmitz
>>>Easy: let them spell wiskey
Which one... Scottish or Irish?
Any of them spelled my way? 8-)
Either, once you get near the bottom of the bottle....
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Jun 5 '07 #48

P: n/a
osmium wrote:
"Chris Hills" writes:

>>No it is NOT. US English is used in the US. There are in fact 6 version
of English in use in the world. British English being the most widely
used.


I can't help noticing that British English likes to name things for what
they are not, rather than what they are. For example, "wireless" and
"horseless carriage". If they had been put in charge I expect we would be
talking about "gearless calculators" instead of computers.

I wonder what the six varieties of English are. I come up with:

British English
Indian English
Australian English
US English
Canadian English.

But I can't come up with a sixth. I would be comfortable if US and Canadian
were lumped into "North American English" if someone can come up with two
varieties not mentioned above.

How about English as spoken in Belize where it is an "official"
language along with Spanish.(Belize used to be British Honduras.)
Anecdotal evidence: I've been fortunate to be able to do a good
deal of travelling around the world in the last twenty years,
much of it in the third world. It's a common experience, once you
are identified as an English speaker, to be approached by young
people who are learning English and want to practice it on you.
It's happened often enough to make it stand out in my memory that
they say they want to learn to speak "American English." Maybe
it's because I'm an American, but I think in most cases students
learning English in countries where they don't encounter many
foreign visitors can't detect the nationality of English speakers
from their accents. (I've never made a point of telling people
I'm an American; it has to be dragged out of me :-)

JS
Jun 6 '07 #49

P: n/a
Chris Hills wrote:
>
.... snip ...
>
I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US
and Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole
world cried foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal)
wall and Canada who said Every country should have a wall on it's
Southern border :-)
Never happen. We Canadians have been coming down here for
generations to rescue the US system (and to earn more money -
incidental of course). :-)

--
<http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/pubs/vista_cost.txt>
<http://www.securityfocus.com/columnists/423>
<http://www.aaxnet.com/editor/edit043.html>
<http://kadaitcha.cx/vista/dogsbreakfast/index.html>
cbfalconer at maineline dot net

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Jun 6 '07 #50

56 Replies

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.