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how to add two no. of 100 digits or more?

P: n/a
Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.

May 30 '07 #1
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P: n/a
Umesh wrote:
Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.
Yes

--
Ian Collins.
May 30 '07 #2

P: n/a
On May 30, 3:53 am, Umesh <fraternitydispo...@gmail.comwrote:
Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.
Link with a library which does that.

May 30 '07 #3

P: n/a
On May 30, 1:00 pm, Ian Collins <ian-n...@hotmail.comwrote:
Umesh wrote:
Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.

Yes

--
Ian Collins.
But howwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww????????????????????????????? ????

May 30 '07 #4

P: n/a
Sanchit said:
On May 30, 1:00 pm, Ian Collins <ian-n...@hotmail.comwrote:
>Umesh wrote:
Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.

Yes

--
Ian Collins.

But howwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww????????????????????????????? ????
Well, he says he's Sanchit, but he's acting like Umesh.

Into the killfile with him.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
May 30 '07 #5

P: n/a
On May 30, 3:32 pm, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
Sanchit said:
On May 30, 1:00 pm, Ian Collins <ian-n...@hotmail.comwrote:
Umesh wrote:
Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.
Yes
--
Ian Collins.
But howwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww????????????????????????????? ????

Well, he says he's Sanchit, but he's acting like Umesh.

Into the killfile with him.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
I am Sanchit only..... not umesh..... So I want to know how can i do
this.... can anyone tell me this

May 30 '07 #6

P: n/a
Sanchit wrote:
On May 30, 3:32 pm, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
>Sanchit said:
>>On May 30, 1:00 pm, Ian Collins <ian-n...@hotmail.comwrote:
Umesh wrote:
Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.
Yes
--
Ian Collins.
But howwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww????????????????????????????? ????
Well, he says he's Sanchit, but he's acting like Umesh.

Into the killfile with him.
*Please* don't quote people's signatures.
>
I am Sanchit only..... not umesh..... So I want to know how can i do
this.... can anyone tell me this
Use an arbitrary precision library.

--
Ian Collins.
May 30 '07 #7

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"Umesh" <fr****************@gmail.comwrote:
Is there any way by which i can do it?
Is there any way you can do *WHAT*?

Oh, I see you put most of your message body in the
"Subject" header again. Tsk, tsk.

I just got through writing functions to add, subtract, and
multiply integers of up to two billion digits. (The greatest
expressible number is well over 10^2000000000, which, in case
you don't realize, is so big it's no longer "astronomical".
Astronomy doesn't use numbers anywhere near that large.
Combinatorial analysis, however, does.)

Alas, though, my functions are in C++, not C.

Basically, use strings of digits to represent the decimal
expansions of integers. Do arithmetic manually on the
individual digits, just like you do when adding numbers
with pencil and paper. Don't forget to carry when the
sum of any two digits (plus previous carry) is 9.

For what it's worth, the following may give you an idea of
the algorithm you need. I'm afraid you'll have to translate
it to C and intuit the unresolved references yourself.
(If it doesn't make any sense to you, google "addition algorithm".)

rhmath::BigNum rhmath::operator+(const BigNum& a, const BigNum& b)
{
if ( a.neg() && !b.neg()) {return (( b)-(-a));} // could go either way
if (!a.neg() && b.neg()) {return (( a)-(-b));} // could go either way
if ( a.neg() && b.neg()) {return -((-a)+(-b));} // always negative

// If we get to here, a and b are both non-negative integers.

// Get sizes of a and b:
long a_size = a.str().size();
long b_size = b.str().size();

// Get necessary size for C:
long C_size = 1;
if (a_size C_size) {C_size = a_size;}
if (b_size C_size) {C_size = b_size;}
C_size += 1;

// Make a string of 0s of length C_size:
std::string C (C_size, '0');

register long i = 1;
register int accum = 0;
register int carry = 0;

while ( i <= C_size )
{
// Reset Accumulator:
accum = 0;

if (i <= a_size) accum += ctoi(a.str()[a_size - i]);
if (i <= b_size) accum += ctoi(b.str()[b_size - i]);
if (carry 0)
{
accum += carry;
carry = 0;
}

// If overflow occured, transfer overflow to carry:
while (accum 9) {carry += 1; accum -= 10;}

// Insert character representation of accumulator in C:
C[C_size - i] = itoc(accum);

// Move on to next-higher place value:
++i;
}
return BigNum (C);
}

--
Cheers,
Robbie Hatley
lonewolf aatt well dott com
triple-dubya dott tustinfreezone dott org
May 30 '07 #8

P: n/a
On May 30, 3:53 pm, Umesh <fraternitydispo...@gmail.comwrote:
Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.
I think you can reference the book << Numerical Recipes in C:The Art
of Scientific Computing,Second Edition>>.

May 30 '07 #9

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On May 30, 12:53 am, Umesh <fraternitydispo...@gmail.comwrote:
Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.
Use one of these thingies:
http://www.medicis.polytechnique.fr/...mings-220.html

A web search will turn up stuff like this in just a few keystrokes and
hey -- no waiting. Better yet, no punching bag duty for off-topic
questions.

IMO-YMMV.

May 30 '07 #10

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In article <11*********************@g37g2000prf.googlegroups. com>,
Umesh <fr****************@gmail.comwrote:
Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.
Yes. You do it the same way you would do it by hand on paper. The main
difference is that it might be more convenient to work in something
other than base 10, depending on exactly how you have the numbers
represented.

If *all* you need to do is add numbers, this is sufficient. It will be
easy to implement, and the time complexity will be O(N), where N is the
number of digits in the larger number, and that is the best you can do,
so no need to use an arbitrary precision library.

However, if you need to multiple or divide numbers with 100 digits or
more, then do as others have said, and find an arbitrary precision
library that looks good to you and use it. While you can reasonably
implement multiplication on your own following the common by-hand
algorithm, that's O(N^2) to multiply two N digit numbers, and that is
considerably slower than what you can do, but getting better involves
things not for the feint of heart. (I left subtraction out...it's not
really much different from addition, but you can blow it, so it can go
either way as to whether doing it yourself or using a library is best if
all you need is addition and subtraction).

See Knuth volume 2 for the details. (If possible, see all editions of
Knuth volume 2, because there were major changes to that part of the
book between the first edition, the second edition, and the third
edition. I think the second edition is the best if you want to
understand this area, rather than just copy an algorithm out of the
book).

--
--Tim Smith
May 31 '07 #11

P: n/a
Tak
On 5月30日, 下午3时53分, Umesh <fraternitydispo...@gmail.comwrote:
Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.
#include<iostream>
#include<string>
#include<iomanip>
#include<algorithm>
using namespace std;

#define MAXN 9999
#define DLEN 4

class BigNum
{
private:
int a[500];//可以控制大数的位数
int len; //大数长度
public:
BigNum(){len = 1;memset(a,0,sizeof(a));}
BigNum(const int);
BigNum(const char*);
BigNum(const BigNum &);
BigNum &operator=(const BigNum &);
BigNum operator+(const BigNum &) const;
BigNum operator-(const BigNum &) const;
BigNum operator*(const BigNum &) const;
BigNum operator/(const int &) const;
BigNum operator^(const int &) const;
int operator%(const int &) const;
bool operator>(const BigNum & T)const;
void print();
};

BigNum::BigNum(const int b)
{
int c,d = b;
len = 0;
memset(a,0,sizeof(a));
while(d MAXN)
{
c = d - (d / (MAXN + 1)) * (MAXN + 1);
d = d / (MAXN + 1);
a[len++] = c;
}
a[len++] = d;
}

BigNum::BigNum(const char*s)
{
int t,k,index,l;
memset(a,0,sizeof(a));
l = strlen(s);
len = l / DLEN;
if(l % DLEN)len++;
index = 0;
for(int i = l-1; i >= 0; i -= DLEN)
{
t = 0; k = i - DLEN + 1;
if(k < 0) k = 0;
for(int j = k; j <= i; j++)
t = t * 10 + s[j] - '0';
a[index++] = t;
}
}
BigNum::BigNum(const BigNum & T) : len(T.len)
{
int i;
memset(a,0,sizeof(a));
for(i = 0; i < len; i++)a[i] = T.a[i];
}
BigNum & BigNum::operator=(const BigNum & n)
{
len = n.len;
memset(a,0,sizeof(a));
for(int i = 0; i < len; i++)
a[i] = n.a[i];
return *this;
}
BigNum BigNum::operator+(const BigNum & T) const
{
BigNum t(*this);
int i,big;//位数
big = T.len len ? T.len : len;
for(i = 0; i < big; i++)
{
t.a[i] +=T.a[i];
if(t.a[i] MAXN)
{
t.a[i+1]++;
t.a[i] -= MAXN+1;
}
}
if(t.a[big] != 0)
t.len = big + 1;
else
t.len = big;
return t;
}
BigNum BigNum::operator-(const BigNum & T) const
{
int i,j,big;
bool flag;
BigNum t1,t2;
if(*this>T)
{
t1 = *this;
t2 = T;
flag = 0;
}
else
{
t1 = T;
t2 = *this;
flag = 1;
}
big = t1.len;
for(i = 0; i < big; i++)
{
if(t1.a[i] < t2.a[i])
{
j = i + 1;
while(t1.a[j] == 0) j++;
t1.a[j--]--;
while(j i) t1.a[j--] += MAXN;
t1.a[i] += MAXN + 1 - t2.a[i];
}
else
t1.a[i] -= t2.a[i];
}
t1.len = big;
while(t1.a[len - 1] == 0 && t1.len 1)
{
t1.len--;
big--;
}
if(flag)
t1.a[big-1] = 0 - t1.a[big-1];
return t1;
}
BigNum BigNum::operator*(const BigNum & T) const
{
BigNum ret;
int i,j,up;
int temp,temp1;
for(i = 0 ; i < len ; i++)
{
up = 0;
for(j = 0 ; j < T.len ; j++)
{
temp = a[i] * T.a[j] + ret.a[i+j] + up;
if(temp MAXN)
{
temp1 = temp - temp / (MAXN + 1) * (MAXN + 1);
up = temp / (MAXN + 1);
ret.a[i + j] = temp1;
}
else
{
up = 0;
ret.a[i + j] = temp;
}
}
if(up != 0)
ret.a[i + j] = up;
}
ret.len = i + j;
while(ret.a[ret.len - 1] == 0 && ret.len 1) ret.len--;
return ret;
}
BigNum BigNum::operator/(const int & b) const
{
BigNum ret;
int i,down = 0;
for(i = len-1; i >= 0; i--)
{
ret.a[i] = (a[i] + down * (MAXN + 1)) / b;
down = a[i] + down * (MAXN + 1) - ret.a[i] * b;
}
ret.len = len;
while(ret.a[ret.len - 1] == 0 && ret.len 1) ret.len--;
return ret;
}
int BigNum::operator %(const int & b) const
{
int i,d = 0;
for (i = len-1; i >= 0; i--)
{
d = ((d * (MAXN+1)) % b + a[i]) % b;
}
return d;
}
BigNum BigNum::operator^(const int & n) const
{
BigNum t,ret(1);
if(n < 0) exit(-1);
if(n == 0) return 1;
if(n == 1) return *this;
int m = n;
while(m 1)
{
t = *this;
for(int i=1;i<<1<=m;i<<=1)
t=t*t;
m -= i;
ret = ret*t;
if(m == 1)ret = ret * (*this);
}
return ret;
}
bool BigNum::operator>(const BigNum & T) const
{
int ln;
if(len T.len)
return true;
else if(len == T.len)
{
ln = len - 1;
while(a[ln] == T.a[ln] && ln >= 0) ln--;
if(ln >= 0 && a[ln] T.a[ln])
return true;
else
return false;
}
else
return false;
}
void BigNum::print()
{
int i;
cout << a[len-1];
for(i = len-2; i >= 0; i--)
{
cout.width(DLEN);
cout.fill('0');
cout << a[i];
}
cout << endl;
}

Jun 1 '07 #12

P: n/a
Tak <ka******@gmail.comwrites:
On 5月30日, 下午3时53分, Umesh <fraternitydispo...@gmail.comwrote:
>Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.

#include<iostream>
#include<string>
#include<iomanip>
#include<algorithm>
using namespace std;
[snip]

This is comp.lang.c. comp.lang.c++ is down the hall, just past the
water cooler, second door on the left.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <* <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
"We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
-- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
Jun 1 '07 #13

P: n/a
Tak wrote, On 01/06/07 05:50:
On 5月30日, 下午3时53分, Umesh <fraternitydispo...@gmail.comwrote:
>Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.

#include<iostream>
<snip>

Please read the name of the group again. This group is for C, there is a
separate group for C++.
--
Flash Gordon
Jun 1 '07 #14

P: n/a
On May 29, 11:06 pm, "Robbie Hatley" <bogus.addr...@no.spamwrote:
I just got through writing functions to add,
subtract, and multiply integers ...
(The greatest expressible number is well over
10^2000000000, which, in case
you don't realize, is so big it's no
longer "astronomical".
Here's a program at Robert Munafo's site:
http://home.earthlink.net/~mrob/pub/perl/hypercalc.txt
which operates on *much* bigger numbers than the
tiny ones you mention :-) It's written in perl;
sorry if that makes it off-topic here.

For a good time, browse around at Mr. Munafo's
site. He has some interesting pages, including
mention of some integers which are too
large even for his hypercalc program.

James Dow Allen
Jun 1 '07 #15

P: n/a
Tak wrote:
Umesh <fraternitydispo...@gmail.comwrote:
>Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.

#include<iostream>
#include<string>
#include<iomanip>
#include<algorithm>
using namespace std;

#define MAXN 9999
#define DLEN 4

class BigNum
{
private:
int a[500];//可以控制大数的位数
int len; //大数长度
public:
BigNum(){len = 1;memset(a,0,sizeof(a));}
This has nothing to do with the C language.

--
<http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/pubs/vista_cost.txt>
<http://www.securityfocus.com/columnists/423>
<http://www.aaxnet.com/editor/edit043.html>
<http://kadaitcha.cx/vista/dogsbreakfast/index.html>
cbfalconer at maineline dot net

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Jun 1 '07 #16

P: n/a
Tak
On 6月1日, 下午2时30分, Flash Gordon <s...@flash-gordon.me.ukwrote:
Tak wrote, On 01/06/07 05:50:
On 5月30日, 下午3时53分, Umesh <fraternitydispo....@gmail.comwrote:
Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.
#include<iostream>

<snip>

Please read the name of the group again. This group is for C, there is a
separate group for C++.
--
Flash Gordon
The key is maybe I could help to solve the asker's puzzle.
It's more important than whether it is a group for c or c++,I think.

Jun 1 '07 #17

P: n/a
Tak said:
On 6?1?, ??2?30?, Flash Gordon <s...@flash-gordon.me.ukwrote:
>Tak wrote, On 01/06/07 05:50:
On 5?30?, ??3?53?, Umesh <fraternitydispo...@gmail.comwrote:
Is there any way by which i can do it? Thanks.
#include<iostream>

<snip>

Please read the name of the group again. This group is for C, there
is a separate group for C++.

The key is maybe I could help to solve the asker's puzzle.
Here are some other puzzles you might be able to solve: How come a
guitar capo knows all the easy chords? Why are meteorologists so lousy
at their job? What does "prime number" mean. Who was Nelson? Who is
Christine Perfect? What type is 'x'? If four and a half chickens take
four and a half days to lay four and a half eggs, how many eggs can
half a dozen chickens lay in half a dozen days? What is the difference
between a dwarf and a gnome? What's the average rainfall of the Amazon
basin?
It's more important than whether it is a group for c or c++,I think.
You might think that, but lots of us disagree with you, and for
excellent reasons. Please note that the answer to at least one of the
questions above depends on what programming language you are using.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Jun 1 '07 #18

P: n/a
Tak
On 6月1日, 下午6时09分, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
Here are some other puzzles you might be able to solve: How come a
guitar capo knows all the easy chords? Why are meteorologists so lousy
at their job? What does "prime number" mean. Who was Nelson? Who is
Christine Perfect? What type is 'x'? If four and a half chickens take
four and a half days to lay four and a half eggs, how many eggs can
half a dozen chickens lay in half a dozen days? What is the difference
between a dwarf and a gnome? What's the average rainfall of the Amazon
basin?
haha...I really want to know the answers to these questions.
tell me please, thank you.
Jun 1 '07 #19

P: n/a
Tak said:
On 6?1?, ??6?09?, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
>Here are some other puzzles you might be able to solve: How come a
guitar capo knows all the easy chords? Why are meteorologists so
lousy at their job? What does "prime number" mean. Who was Nelson?
Who is Christine Perfect? What type is 'x'? If four and a half
chickens take four and a half days to lay four and a half eggs, how
many eggs can half a dozen chickens lay in half a dozen days? What is
the difference between a dwarf and a gnome? What's the average
rainfall of the Amazon basin?

haha...I really want to know the answers to these questions.
tell me please, thank you.
The point, I hope, is clear. The sum of human knowledge, whilst
remaining pathetically finite, is nevertheless so astoundingly large
that the only way we can hope to make sense of it is to categorise.

It is for that reason that we have multiple newsgroups, rather than just
one. People seek out newsgroups that deal with the topics in which they
are interested. If those newsgroups get choked up with all kinds of
other stuff, they become less useful.

*This* newsgroup is for discussing C. If you want to discuss C++, that's
fine, but comp.lang.c++ is the newsgroup in which to do it.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Jun 1 '07 #20

P: n/a
Tak
On 6月1日, 下午7时41分, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
Tak said:
On 6?1?, ??6?09?, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
Here are some other puzzles you might be able to solve: How come a
guitar capo knows all the easy chords? Why are meteorologists so
lousy at their job? What does "prime number" mean. Who was Nelson?
Who is Christine Perfect? What type is 'x'? If four and a half
chickens take four and a half days to lay four and a half eggs, how
many eggs can half a dozen chickens lay in half a dozen days? What is
the difference between a dwarf and a gnome? What's the average
rainfall of the Amazon basin?
haha...I really want to know the answers to these questions.
tell me please, thank you.

The point, I hope, is clear. The sum of human knowledge, whilst
remaining pathetically finite, is nevertheless so astoundingly large
that the only way we can hope to make sense of it is to categorise.

It is for that reason that we have multiple newsgroups, rather than just
one. People seek out newsgroups that deal with the topics in which they
are interested. If those newsgroups get choked up with all kinds of
other stuff, they become less useful.

*This* newsgroup is for discussing C. If you want to discuss C++, that's
fine, but comp.lang.c++ is the newsgroup in which to do it.
I confess you are right.
but should we say "sorry , we can't help you, please goto comp.lang.c+
+ where may help you"?

Jun 1 '07 #21

P: n/a
Tak said:
On 6?1?, ??7?41?, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
<snip>
>*This* newsgroup is for discussing C. If you want to discuss C++,
that's fine, but comp.lang.c++ is the newsgroup in which to do it.

I confess you are right.
but should we say "sorry , we can't help you, please goto comp.lang.c+
+ where may help you"?
Firstly, the OP posted in comp.lang.c, so we may presume in the absence
of further information that he is programming in C. It was not he, but
you, who introduced C++ into the thread.

Secondly, you /were/ told that there is a group appropriate for C++
discussions. See message <f0************@news.flash-gordon.me.ukwhere
Flash told you:

"Please read the name of the group again. This group is for C, there is
a separate group for C++."

It is true that he didn't actually mention comp.lang.c++ by name. I
expect he thought you could figure that out for yourself.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Jun 1 '07 #22

P: n/a
Tak
On 6月1日, 下午9时31分, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
Tak said:
On 6?1?, ??7?41?, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:

<snip>
*This* newsgroup is for discussing C. If you want to discuss C++,
that's fine, but comp.lang.c++ is the newsgroup in which to do it.
I confess you are right.
but should we say "sorry , we can't help you, please goto comp.lang.c+
+ where may help you"?

Firstly, the OP posted in comp.lang.c, so we may presume in the absence
of further information that he is programming in C. It was not he, but
you, who introduced C++ into the thread.

Secondly, you /were/ told that there is a group appropriate for C++
discussions. See message <f0r4j4xbud....@news.flash-gordon.me.ukwhere
Flash told you:

"Please read the name of the group again. This group is for C, there is
a separate group for C++."

It is true that he didn't actually mention comp.lang.c++ by name. I
expect he thought you could figure that out for yourself.

Richard,forgive my coming unpolite question, I find that you are very
familiar with the google group,how long have you been here? and Why
are meteorologists so lousy at their job?

Jun 1 '07 #23

P: n/a
Tak said:

<snip>
Richard,forgive my coming unpolite question, I find that you are very
familiar with the google group,how long have you been here?
This isn't a Google Group. This is Usenet. Calling it a Google Group is
like calling the sky "Heathrow Airport" just because you happened to
board a plane there.

But to answer your question, my first post to comp.lang.c was in 1998,
which is before Google was even incorporated. "Google Groups" came into
existence some years later, in 2001. The comp.lang.c newsgroup was here
long before Google Groups existed, then - and no doubt it will still be
here long after Google Groups has died.
and Why
are meteorologists so lousy at their job?
<grinThat one's easy - the weather is a chaotic system. Weather
prediction is basically impossible, so they're onto a loser. (To be
fair, they do of course know this, and still do the best they can.)

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Jun 1 '07 #24

P: n/a
Tak
On 6月1日, 下午11时34分, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
But to answer your question, my first post to comp.lang.c was in 1998,
which is before Google was even incorporated. "Google Groups" came into
existence some years later, in 2001. The comp.lang.c newsgroup was here
long before Google Groups existed, then - and no doubt it will still be
here long after Google Groups has died.
Oh,I even don't know what is Internet in 1998.

Jun 1 '07 #25

P: n/a
Tak said:
On 6?1?, ??11?34?, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
>But to answer your question, my first post to comp.lang.c was in
1998, which is before Google was even incorporated. "Google Groups"
came into existence some years later, in 2001. The comp.lang.c
newsgroup was here long before Google Groups existed, then - and no
doubt it will still be here long after Google Groups has died.

Oh,I even don't know what is Internet in 1998.
In fact, comp.lang.c dates back to at least 1983, although it was called
net.lang.c at first (or quite possibly net!lang!c). The Internet kind
of evolved, so it's hard to pin a date on its creation, although that
doesn't stop lots of people insisting on particular dates.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Jun 1 '07 #26

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrites:
Tak said:
On 6?1?, ??11?34?, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
But to answer your question, my first post to comp.lang.c was in
1998, which is before Google was even incorporated. "Google Groups"
came into existence some years later, in 2001. The comp.lang.c
newsgroup was here long before Google Groups existed, then - and no
doubt it will still be here long after Google Groups has died.
Oh,I even don't know what is Internet in 1998.

In fact, comp.lang.c dates back to at least 1983, although it was called
net.lang.c at first (or quite possibly net!lang!c).
I don't think so (but I wasn't there). I think that ! where used for
explicit routing of email (so you gave all the computers via which it had
to be transfered) with uucp. news could also be propagated via uucp, but
there is no interest in specifying a routing. You still have trace of this
usage in the Path: header, which give you the route by which the post has
reached you.
The Internet kind of evolved, so it's hard to pin a date on its creation,
although that doesn't stop lots of people insisting on particular dates.
http://www.computerhistory.org/exhib...ernet_history/

is probably a good start.

Yours,

--
Jean-Marc
Jun 1 '07 #27

P: n/a

James Dow Allen wrote:
Robbie Hatley wrote:
I just got through writing functions to add,
subtract, and multiply integers ...
(The greatest expressible number is well over
10^2000000000, which, in case
you don't realize, is so big it's no
longer "astronomical".

Here's a program at Robert Munafo's site:
http://home.earthlink.net/~mrob/pub/perl/hypercalc.txt
which operates on *much* bigger numbers than the
tiny ones you mention :-) It's written in perl;
sorry if that makes it off-topic here.
Much, much larger than 10^2000000000? Sheesh, that's one
damn big number!

::: looks at site :::

The biggest number that calculator can handle is...
10^(10^(... ^(10^300) ...)) (with 10000000000 10s).
Exponential recursion 10000000000 levels deep. Wow.
I can't even comprehend how big that is.

And yet, I wonder how many of those digits are significant?
Probably about 10 digits of actual precision.

My system, on the other hand, offers 2147483647 significant
digits of precision. (Or it would if I had at least three
1-gibibyte RAM modules in my machine, instead of just one,
as I currently have.)

I was able to calculate the first 10,000 digits of the
fibonacci sequence -- out to 2092 sig figs -- in about
1 second last night. :-)

A very brief sample:

76540904677569363784158845383489763407680649939789 54512095813
12384578529797304192493293627316781267732493780359 086838016392
20038668997554240570909178165665757608500558774338 041350112205
32423247527351544763402471792982538876233052554697 128188128597
52461916524905785334311649958648296484733611329035 169538240802
84885164052257330097714121751630835360966663883732 297726369399
13734708057716311543202577171027913184570027521276 7467264610201
22223224462942044552973989346190996720666693909649 9764990979600
35957932520658356096176566517218909905236721430926 7232255589801
For a good time, browse around at Mr. Munafo's
site. He has some interesting pages, including
mention of some integers which are too
large even for his hypercalc program.
Like I say, the precision of that calculator doesn't impress me.
The SIZE of the numbers, yes; but not the precision (number of
SIGNIFICANT digits). I doubt the calculator could handle
even the nine integers above.

Now, as for Mr. Munafo's web site...

http://home.earthlink.net/~mrob/pub/math/largenum.html

::: looks at site :::

Hmmm... He looks a lot like my coworker, Ron. Is receding
hairlines genetically linked to computer-programming ability? ;-)

Nice chart combining both the SI and IEC-binary prefixes.
I think I want a 1-ZettaHertz computer with 37 YobiBytes of RAM.

Cool site altogether. I bookmarked it for future reference.
Thanks for the link.

--
Cheers,
Robbie Hatley
East Tustin, CA, USA
lonewolf aatt well dott com
triple-dubya dott tustinfreezone dott org
Jun 1 '07 #28

P: n/a
Jean-Marc Bourguet said:
Richard Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrites:
<snip>
>>
In fact, comp.lang.c dates back to at least 1983, although it was
called net.lang.c at first (or quite possibly net!lang!c).

I don't think so (but I wasn't there). I think that ! where used for
explicit routing of email
Oh yes, of course you're right.

<snip>
>The Internet kind of evolved, so it's hard to pin a date on its
creation, although that doesn't stop lots of people insisting on
particular dates.

http://www.computerhistory.org/exhib...ernet_history/

is probably a good start.
Well, it certainly illustrates my point. Even assuming that that history
is canonical, it would still be hard to give a particular date and say
"on this day" (or even in this *year*), "the Internet did not exist,
but by the next, it did". Somewhere between 1977 and 1983 would be my
guess.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Jun 1 '07 #29

P: n/a
In article <px*************@news.bourguet.org>,
Jean-Marc Bourguet <jm@bourguet.orgwrote:
>I think that ! where used for
explicit routing of email (so you gave all the computers via which it had
to be transfered) with uucp. news could also be propagated via uucp,
Usenet news was almost entirely uucp until the late 80s, though I
think some sites received magnetic tapes each day.
>but
there is no interest in specifying a routing. You still have trace of this
usage in the Path: header, which give you the route by which the post has
reached you.
And you will notice that the path usually ends "not-for-mail", to stop
you trying to send mail back along the path, which used to be
possible.

-- Richard
--
"Consideration shall be given to the need for as many as 32 characters
in some alphabets" - X3.4, 1963.
Jun 1 '07 #30

P: n/a
>>>>"RH" == Richard Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrites:

RHJean-Marc Bourguet said:
>Richard Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrites:
>>The Internet kind of evolved, so it's hard to pin a date on
its creation, although that doesn't stop lots of people
insisting on particular dates.
> http://www.computerhistory.org/exhib...ernet_history/

is probably a good start.
RHWell, it certainly illustrates my point. Even assuming that
RHthat history is canonical, it would still be hard to give a
RHparticular date and say "on this day" (or even in this
RH*year*), "the Internet did not exist, but by the next, it
RHdid". Somewhere between 1977 and 1983 would be my guess.

It depends on what you mean by "Internet," and what definition you use
to distingush what-preceded-the-Internet from what-is-the-Internet,
and whether it was sufficient for the system to be specified, working,
or in broad use.

Once you agree on those criteria, pinning down a date to within a few
weeks should be a simple matter of research.

Charlton
--
Charlton Wilbur
cw*****@chromatico.net
Jun 1 '07 #31

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrites:
[...]
In fact, comp.lang.c dates back to at least 1983, although it was called
net.lang.c at first (or quite possibly net!lang!c). The Internet kind
of evolved, so it's hard to pin a date on its creation, although that
doesn't stop lots of people insisting on particular dates.
As has already been noted, foo!bar!baz style paths were used for
e-mail routing, not newsgroup names.

The net.lang.c newsgroup was created October 21, 1982. Google has the
announcement, which apparently was the very first message on the
newsgroup, in its archives.

The group was renamed from net.lang.c to comp.lang.c as part of the
"Great Renaming". The name change was announced November 7, 1986.

Note that Usenet was *not* originally part of the Internet. The
Internet is, by definition, a network that communicates via the
Internet Protocol (IP, often TCP/IP, but there are other
sub-protocols). In the early days, Usenet was transmitted mostly via
UUCP, and in some cases, as Richard Tobin mentioned, via magnetic
tapes.

(I never posted to net.lang.c. My first posting to comp.lang.c,
according to Google, was on August 5, 1989. My first posting to
comp.lang.c that I would now consider topical was on April 23, 1996
(and that was part of a flame war cross-posted to 4 different
newsgroups).

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <* <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
"We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
-- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
Jun 1 '07 #32

P: n/a
On Jun 1, 4:48 am, Tak <kakat...@gmail.comwrote:
On 6 1 , 7 41 , Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:


Tak said:
On 6?1?, ??6?09?, Richard Heathfield <r...@see.sig.invalidwrote:
>Here are some other puzzles you might be able to solve: How come a
>guitar capo knows all the easy chords? Why are meteorologists so
>lousy at their job? What does "prime number" mean. Who was Nelson?
>Who is Christine Perfect? What type is 'x'? If four and a half
>chickens take four and a half days to lay four and a half eggs, how
>many eggs can half a dozen chickens lay in half a dozen days? What is
>the difference between a dwarf and a gnome? What's the average
>rainfall of the Amazon basin?
haha...I really want to know the answers to these questions.
tell me please, thank you.
The point, I hope, is clear. The sum of human knowledge, whilst
remaining pathetically finite, is nevertheless so astoundingly large
that the only way we can hope to make sense of it is to categorise.
It is for that reason that we have multiple newsgroups, rather than just
one. People seek out newsgroups that deal with the topics in which they
are interested. If those newsgroups get choked up with all kinds of
other stuff, they become less useful.
*This* newsgroup is for discussing C. If you want to discuss C++, that's
fine, but comp.lang.c++ is the newsgroup in which to do it.

I confess you are right.
but should we say "sorry , we can't help you, please goto comp.lang.c+
+ where may help you
Send him your answer by email, or refer him to a group where your
answer is topical.
Jun 1 '07 #33

P: n/a
In article <11*********************@i38g2000prf.googlegroups. comTak <ka******@gmail.comwrites:
On 6=D4=C21=C8=D5, =CF=C2=CE=E711=CA=B134=B7=D6, Richard Heathfield <r...@s=
ee.sig.invalidwrote:
But to answer your question, my first post to comp.lang.c was in 1998,
which is before Google was even incorporated. "Google Groups" came into
existence some years later, in 2001. The comp.lang.c newsgroup was here
long before Google Groups existed, then - and no doubt it will still be
here long after Google Groups has died.

Oh,I even don't know what is Internet in 1998.
It is even much older. And Usenet is not Internet. In about 1983 we
received Usenet but had not yet access to Internet because the US
NSF would not allow non-US and non-Canadian sites on the Internet at
that point of time. The oldest article by me I can find in net.lang.c
dates from 1985.
--
dik t. winter, cwi, kruislaan 413, 1098 sj amsterdam, nederland, +31205924131
home: bovenover 215, 1025 jn amsterdam, nederland; http://www.cwi.nl/~dik/
Jun 2 '07 #34

P: n/a
"Dik T. Winter" <Di********@cwi.nlwrites:
In article <11*********************@i38g2000prf.googlegroups. comTak <ka******@gmail.comwrites:
On 6=D4=C21=C8=D5, =CF=C2=CE=E711=CA=B134=B7=D6, Richard Heathfield <r...@s=
ee.sig.invalidwrote:
>
But to answer your question, my first post to comp.lang.c was in 1998,
which is before Google was even incorporated. "Google Groups" came into
existence some years later, in 2001. The comp.lang.c newsgroup was here
long before Google Groups existed, then - and no doubt it will still be
here long after Google Groups has died.
>
Oh,I even don't know what is Internet in 1998.

It is even much older. And Usenet is not Internet. In about 1983 we
received Usenet but had not yet access to Internet because the US
NSF would not allow non-US and non-Canadian sites on the Internet at
that point of time.
UCL[1] was linked to Arpanet sometime in the late seventies[2]. By 1980
the connection was real service rather than a research toy. By the
time I started there in 1983 it was just part of the infrastructure.

You many be thinking of the fact that, as I remember it, the NSF
started to get involved in the funding in around 1983 (it was all
DARPA and UK sources such at BT up until then).

[1] University College London (i.e. in Europe).
[2] Initially the connection was part-time.

--
Ben.
Jun 2 '07 #35

P: n/a
In article <f3***********@pc-news.cogsci.ed.ac.ukri*****@cogsci.ed.ac.uk (Richard Tobin) writes:
In article <px*************@news.bourguet.org>,
Jean-Marc Bourguet <jm@bourguet.orgwrote:
I think that ! where used for
explicit routing of email (so you gave all the computers via which it had
to be transfered) with uucp. news could also be propagated via uucp,

Usenet news was almost entirely uucp until the late 80s, though I
think some sites received magnetic tapes each day.
Australia received its news and mail feed from UCB by magnetic tape.
but
there is no interest in specifying a routing. You still have trace of this
usage in the Path: header, which give you the route by which the post has
reached you.

And you will notice that the path usually ends "not-for-mail", to stop
you trying to send mail back along the path, which used to be
possible.
Not necessarily. There always have been paths that were usable for
news only (or for mail only). Also there were edges in the paths that
were not bidirectional. So using the path never made sure that your
mail message would arrive. That is why you see in old Usenet messages
nearly always in the signature some mention of a mail-path. My first
one was:
decvax!mcvax!turing!dik
followed in December 1984 by:
{decvax|seismo|philabs}!mcvax!turing!dik
because by that time we had three possible feeds from the US (all still
dial-up). The need of the local machine name was removed in 1985 (NFS
came in use). April 1986 we got a first fixed link, but NSF did not yet
allow us on Internet, so it became:
di************@seismo.css.gov
and finally in early 1987
di*@cwi.nl
which it still is (the first domain outside the US and Canada).

(There is a lot of history in my signatures, and also in mcvax, a
VAX-780 with serial number 38. See <www.godfatherof.nl>.)
--
dik t. winter, cwi, kruislaan 413, 1098 sj amsterdam, nederland, +31205924131
home: bovenover 215, 1025 jn amsterdam, nederland; http://www.cwi.nl/~dik/
Jun 2 '07 #36

P: n/a
In article <87************@bsb.me.ukBen Bacarisse <be********@bsb.me.ukwrites:
"Dik T. Winter" <Di********@cwi.nlwrites:
....
It is even much older. And Usenet is not Internet. In about 1983 we
received Usenet but had not yet access to Internet because the US
NSF would not allow non-US and non-Canadian sites on the Internet at
that point of time.

UCL[1] was linked to Arpanet sometime in the late seventies[2]. By 1980
the connection was real service rather than a research toy. By the
time I started there in 1983 it was just part of the infrastructure.

You many be thinking of the fact that, as I remember it, the NSF
started to get involved in the funding in around 1983 (it was all
DARPA and UK sources such at BT up until then).
The DARPA and UK-sites were mainly defense oriented. So even many
research institutes in the UK could not get Internet access. There
were good reasons that when the European network started with cwi.nl,
there were many links from UK Universities through our US link. When
NSF took it over it escaped from the defense orientation. If I
remember correctly we had feeding links to Scandinavia, the UK, Germany,
France, Greece, and a few more. And before the Internet link they were
UUCP links for mail and usenet.
--
dik t. winter, cwi, kruislaan 413, 1098 sj amsterdam, nederland, +31205924131
home: bovenover 215, 1025 jn amsterdam, nederland; http://www.cwi.nl/~dik/
Jun 2 '07 #37

P: n/a
"Dik T. Winter" <Di********@cwi.nlwrites:
In article <87************@bsb.me.ukBen Bacarisse <be********@bsb.me.ukwrites:
"Dik T. Winter" <Di********@cwi.nlwrites:
...
It is even much older. And Usenet is not Internet. In about 1983 we
received Usenet but had not yet access to Internet because the US
NSF would not allow non-US and non-Canadian sites on the Internet at
that point of time.
>
UCL[1] was linked to Arpanet sometime in the late seventies[2]. By 1980
the connection was real service rather than a research toy. By the
time I started there in 1983 it was just part of the infrastructure.
>
You many be thinking of the fact that, as I remember it, the NSF
started to get involved in the funding in around 1983 (it was all
DARPA and UK sources such at BT up until then).

The DARPA and UK-sites were mainly defense oriented.
I don't recall any defence oriented sites in the UK at that time. In
around 1973-74 when UCL got its IMP[1] there certainly were none shown
on the map.
So even many
research institutes in the UK could not get Internet access. There
were good reasons that when the European network started with cwi.nl,
there were many links from UK Universities through our US link. When
NSF took it over it escaped from the defense orientation. If I
remember correctly we had feeding links to Scandinavia, the UK, Germany,
France, Greece, and a few more. And before the Internet link they were
UUCP links for mail and usenet.
I don't want to detract from the excellent work that CWI has done. It
is a fine institution (I have been a visitor there on more than one
occasion). I just wanted to correct the idea there were no "Internet"
sites outside the USA and Canada before about 1983. To that end, I
should add that Norway (at the NUCC in Kjeller) also had a node in
about 1973 or '74.

[1] Interface Message Processor (for those under 45 years old!).
Originally this did not process IP packets as we know them today, so
you could, quite legitimately, say that this was not the "Internet"
(although it was an internet). The ARPA network made a transition to
TCP/IP gradually sometime around 1981-82. I don't know when the first
transatlantic IP tests were done, but I'd guess it was sometime in
1981 or maybe 82. Of course, CWI may have been doing IP tests at
about the same time.

--
Ben.
Jun 2 '07 #38

P: n/a
In article <ln************@nuthaus.mib.org>,
Keith Thompson <ks***@mib.orgwrote:
The net.lang.c newsgroup was created October 21, 1982. Google has the
announcement, which apparently was the very first message on the
newsgroup, in its archives.
Interesting. Anyone still here that goes back that far? The earliest
Google has for me in net.lang.c is from late 1984:

<http://groups.google.com/group/net.l...c20f?dmode=sou
rce>

--
--Tim Smith
Jun 2 '07 #39

P: n/a
On Sat, 02 Jun 2007 09:13:56 -0700, in comp.lang.c , Tim Smith
<re************@mouse-potato.comwrote:
>In article <ln************@nuthaus.mib.org>,
Keith Thompson <ks***@mib.orgwrote:
>The net.lang.c newsgroup was created October 21, 1982. Google has the
announcement, which apparently was the very first message on the
newsgroup, in its archives.

Interesting. Anyone still here that goes back that far? The earliest
Google has for me in net.lang.c is from late 1984:

<http://groups.google.com/group/net.l...c20f?dmode=sou
rce>
sadly. my first identifiable posting was in bit.listserv.infonets back
in 1992. In CLC I can't go back before 2001 as I can't remember the
posting personal pseudonym I used when I was an undergrad in the late
eighties... :-(
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Jun 2 '07 #40

P: n/a
In article <87************@bsb.me.ukBen Bacarisse <be********@bsb.me.ukwrites:
....
The DARPA and UK-sites were mainly defense oriented.

I don't recall any defence oriented sites in the UK at that time. In
around 1973-74 when UCL got its IMP[1] there certainly were none shown
on the map.
Well, that is as I did understand it. I think they got links because
DARPA thought they had their uses. It was all mainly DARPA controlled.
Anyhow, we were refused access to their sattelite link, needed to link
to their network. It was certainly *not* an open network. And I know
for certain that from some UK universities mail sent to UCL took a
path through us to the US, where they arrived on ARPAnet and hence
came back to UCL. If my memory is good enough, the University of Kent
was the main contact between the UK and the remainder of the world.
To that end, I
should add that Norway (at the NUCC in Kjeller) also had a node in
about 1973 or '74.
And there were some additional sites in Scandinavia linked with
BITNET/EARN (IBM's network), and presumably also DECNET links. All
very private. We *had* an EARN connection (HAMCWI6 or something
like that), but did not really use it. And from that time I remember
the tale how a mail message sent from one computer to another in the
same room somewhere in Scandinavia went through the US where there was
a link between the two different networks.
[1] Interface Message Processor (for those under 45 years old!).
Ah, yes, Bolt-Beranek-Newman. Without one you could not connect.
The ARPA network made a transition to
TCP/IP gradually sometime around 1981-82. I don't know when the first
transatlantic IP tests were done, but I'd guess it was sometime in
1981 or maybe 82. Of course, CWI may have been doing IP tests at
about the same time.
No, we were definitely later. The main reason was the link to the US.
Initially we used 300 Bd auto-diallers (that were illegal in the Netherlands),
to reduce cost. It was better to connect at night, but we did not have
the resources to have someone sitting at night to establish connections.
Later we got a leased line from AT&T, but even that had its problems
(do not ask about AT&T billing). But as soon as that was established,
TCP/IP was used. And even the use of TCP/IP was problematical as the EU
had decreed that OSI networking was the way to go. We now all know what
the result of that is.
--
dik t. winter, cwi, kruislaan 413, 1098 sj amsterdam, nederland, +31205924131
home: bovenover 215, 1025 jn amsterdam, nederland; http://www.cwi.nl/~dik/
Jun 3 '07 #41

P: n/a
Dik T. Winter wrote:
Initially we used 300 Bd auto-diallers (that were illegal in the Netherlands),
to reduce cost.
In the USA also, the local telcos claimed the right to break an acoustic
modem call made on a general-purpose tone dial-up line. They would call
and say they had the right to terminate service on account of it (at
least up to 1979, when I received such a call). We were paying 30% extra
for tone dial lines at the time. I had no modem for my first Z80 PC. We
didn't get 56k dial-up until 1999.
How did this come into a thread about multiple precision addition?

Jun 3 '07 #42

P: n/a
In article <87************@bsb.me.ukBen Bacarisse <be********@bsb.me.uk>
wrote, in part:
>The ARPA network made a transition to TCP/IP gradually sometime
around 1981-82.
Actually, it was sort of sudden. I remember a lot of fuss during
the NCP-to-TCP cutover. (The switch was required, though, because
NCP had an 8-bit "host number" and thus was limited to 256 hosts
on the entire worldwide network. :-) ) There was a lot of prep
work first, of course -- and as I recall, a separate network
(or perhaps several) continued to use NCP for some time.

(The University of Maryland got onto what was becoming the Internet
in the mid-1980s, via a connection by ECUs to an IMP that was
actually on MILNET. The remote end of that connection was located
at the NSA, somewhere in or near Fort Meade, which made for a
remarkable snippet of phone conversation one time. ECUs had some
reliability problems, and too-often needed a manual reset. This
had to be done at their end as well, which meant we had to call
someone there to do it. One time when we called -- I was not the
one on the phone, but was present -- I heard Jim, the caller, say
something like: "uh, it's green", followed by an aside to me: "he
wants to know, `what color is my phone'.")

(I will also note here that we were on Usenet by late 1982 or so,
certainly by 1983 anyway. The net.lang.c group existed by the time
I first read Usenet news, though.)

In article <JJ********@cwi.nlDik T. Winter <Di********@cwi.nlwrote:
>Ah, yes, Bolt-Beranek-Newman. Without one you could not connect.
To bring things on topic for a moment :-) we should also mention
the BBN "C machines", so called because they were designed to run
compiled C code. These were probably the first machines so designed,
since earlier architectures generally predated the language.

The "C machines" had 10-bit bytes.

Yes, the first machines specifically designed to work with C had
bigger-than-8-bit bytes.

(See <http://www.isi.edu/in-notes/ien/ien164.txt>. The last
paragraph on page 2, before the footnotes, describes the memory
resources on the C/50 and C/70.)
--
In-Real-Life: Chris Torek, Wind River Systems
Salt Lake City, UT, USA (4039.22'N, 11150.29'W) +1 801 277 2603
email: forget about it http://web.torek.net/torek/index.html
Reading email is like searching for food in the garbage, thanks to spammers.
Jun 3 '07 #43

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In article <Zp******************@newssvr23.news.prodigy.netTi m Prince <ti***********@sbcglobal.netwrites:
Dik T. Winter wrote:
Initially we used 300 Bd auto-diallers (that were illegal in the Netherlands),
to reduce cost.

In the USA also, the local telcos claimed the right to break an acoustic
modem call made on a general-purpose tone dial-up line.
Acoustic modem calls were allowed in Europe if the modem was certified by
the national telco. But they did not certify auto-diallers.
We were paying 30% extra
for tone dial lines at the time.
Yes, that always surprised me. Never heard about such in Europe. Only
that some menu systems did not work if you did *not* use tone dial.
I had no modem for my first Z80 PC. We
didn't get 56k dial-up until 1999.
Here, as long as you held to the standards and the modems were certified, it
was available. So as soon as 56k was standardised, it became available (yes
certification of modems was fairly fast). I think around 1999 already a
fairly large proportion of the public in the Netherlands had broadband
access through cable networks. I think I got mine around 1997. Currently
broadband through either cable or ADSL is fairly common in the Netherlands.
How did this come into a thread about multiple precision addition?
Somebody wondering about comp.lang.c even before 1998 and topic-drift?
--
dik t. winter, cwi, kruislaan 413, 1098 sj amsterdam, nederland, +31205924131
home: bovenover 215, 1025 jn amsterdam, nederland; http://www.cwi.nl/~dik/
Jun 4 '07 #44

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I heard this can be made possible using linked-lists..is it true. If
yes, how?
Jun 9 '07 #45

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Umesh wrote:
I heard this can be made possible using linked-lists..is it true. If
yes, how?
What can? Can't you troll somewhere else?

--
Ian Collins.
Jun 9 '07 #46

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>>>>"U" == Umesh <fr****************@gmail.comwrites:

UI heard this can be made possible using linked-lists..is it
Utrue. If yes, how?

It may or may not be true. Try it and come to your own conclusions.

Charlton
--
Charlton Wilbur
cw*****@chromatico.net
Jun 10 '07 #47

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"Umesh" writes:
>I heard this can be made possible using linked-lists..is it true. If
yes, how?
Is "this" different than "it", or are they the same thing?

Are you trying to kidnap this nostalgia thread for your own nefarious
purposes? Go back a hundred posts or so and try some of the things
suggested to you then; using an array is easier than using a linked list.

And BTW, RH, who *is* Christine Perfect?
Jun 10 '07 #48

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osmium said:

<snip>
And BTW, RH, who *is* Christine Perfect?
Singer with Fleetwood Mac (on and off). She wrote "You make loving fun",
"Don't stop", and "Little lies", among others. And yes, that really is
her name - well, her maiden name, at least.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Jun 10 '07 #49

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On Sun, 10 Jun 2007 03:08:02 +0000, in comp.lang.c , Richard
Heathfield <rj*@see.sig.invalidwrote:
>osmium said:

<snip>
>And BTW, RH, who *is* Christine Perfect?

Singer with Fleetwood Mac (on and off). She wrote "You make loving fun",
"Don't stop", and "Little lies", among others. And yes, that really is
her name - well, her maiden name, at least.
Better knowns as Christine McVie of course.
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Jun 11 '07 #50

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