By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
455,515 Members | 1,848 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 455,515 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

binary files

P: 2
HI! what is binary file?
May 28 '07 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
3 Replies


Savage
Expert 100+
P: 1,764
HI! what is binary file?
I think that the best is to direct to some websites.

Here is one

PS:Please don't double post,becasue you are violating guidelines

PSS:Make sure that u read them,they can help u a lot. :D

Savage
May 28 '07 #2

Banfa
Expert Mod 5K+
P: 8,916
Having followed the link I am not sure I agree with it because it suggests that there is a difference in how a binary and text file is stored. There is not difference in the way a binary and a text file is stored the difference is in what is stored in them and how it is interpreted.

Any file, binary or text, is a series of (normally 8 bit) bytes stored sequencially. Each of these bytes can therefore hold a value between 0 and 255 or -128 and 127 if treated as a signed value.

However for a text file the contents is constrained only to contain values that correspond to printable and whitespace characters when treated as values from the execution character set (often ASCII). For a binary file no such constraint exists the bytes can have any value.

A binary file is strictly any file, a text file is a binary file whose contents follows the constraint of only containing printable or whitespace characters. However in normal usage a binary file is any file that is not a text file.
May 29 '07 #3

Savage
Expert 100+
P: 1,764
Having followed the link I am not sure I agree with it because it suggests that there is a difference in how a binary and text file is stored. There is not difference in the way a binary and a text file is stored the difference is in what is stored in them and how it is interpreted.

Any file, binary or text, is a series of (normally 8 bit) bytes stored sequencially. Each of these bytes can therefore hold a value between 0 and 255 or -128 and 127 if treated as a signed value.

However for a text file the contents is constrained only to contain values that correspond to printable and whitespace characters when treated as values from the execution character set (often ASCII). For a binary file no such constraint exists the bytes can have any value.

A binary file is strictly any file, a text file is a binary file whose contents follows the constraint of only containing printable or whitespace characters. However in normal usage a binary file is any file that is not a text file.
This is true,but if u didn't knowed all of that and u saw same data outputed in diferent format,what would be ur first guess?

Savage
May 29 '07 #4

Post your reply

Sign in to post your reply or Sign up for a free account.