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difference between Rad and C respect delphi

P: n/a
de
between c and c++ I have understood is preferibile c++, but always?
and regarding C# what changes?
Moreover which are the main differences between the rad Turbo C++, Borland
Studio6 C++, Visual Study .NET, Visual C++?

and with all they is possible to make applications that turn with win XP,
Linux and winodows Vista?

Moreover,which are differences between delphi and C++ ?

and if in effects is more simplest to decompile delphi
respect at C.
May 5 '07 #1
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9 Replies


P: n/a
"de" <no****@nospam.comwrote in message
news:1d****************************@40tude.net...
: between c and c++ I have understood is preferibile c++, but always?
: and regarding C# what changes?
: Moreover which are the main differences between the rad Turbo C++,
Borland
: Studio6 C++, Visual Study .NET, Visual C++?

Well, there are many different GUI frameworks for C++
(environments for user interface development).
Same goes for other languages, although they often
have one or few clearly dominant environments.

: and with all they is possible to make applications that turn with win
XP,
: Linux and winodows Vista?

No, most of them are platform-specific.
For an extensive list, see:
http://www.atai.org/guitool/

: Moreover,which are differences between delphi and C++ ?

If you use Borland's development tools, both can be used
in similar ways, with the same libraries. I find C++ to
be more powerful, but one should use delphi if he is more
familiar with it and it fits with the application domain.

: and if in effects is more simplest to decompile delphi
: respect at C.

I do not know what you mean with "decompile".
If you are already familiar with C, basic C++ will be
easier to learn than Delphi (but C++ has many more
features and is complex to learn...).
--
http://ivan.vecerina.com/contact/?subject=NG_POST <- email contact form
Brainbench MVP for C++ <http://www.brainbench.com

May 5 '07 #2

P: n/a
de
>: Moreover,which are differences between delphi and C++ ?
>
If you use Borland's development tools, both can be used
in similar ways, with the same libraries. I find C++ to
be more powerful, but one should use delphi if he is more
familiar with it and it fits with the application domain.
you said for application web?

but for c++ is possible to programmer and compile with freeware
software, instead with delphi I must to acquire their software?

>: and if in effects is more simplest to decompile delphi
: respect at C.

I do not know what you mean with "decompile".
If you are already familiar with C, basic C++ will be
easier to learn than Delphi (but C++ has many more
features and is complex to learn...).
decompiler:
the reverse operation to that of a compiler
I asked for know if c++ is more protect the code
May 5 '07 #3

P: n/a
"de" <no****@nospam.comwrote in message
news:1l******************************@40tude.net.. .
:>: Moreover,which are differences between delphi and C++ ?
: >
: If you use Borland's development tools, both can be used
: in similar ways, with the same libraries. I find C++ to
: be more powerful, but one should use delphi if he is more
: familiar with it and it fits with the application domain.
:
: you said for application web?
:
: but for c++ is possible to programmer and compile with freeware
: software, instead with delphi I must to acquire their software?

Delphi is a language supported by Borland only.
C++ is a standard language supported by many vendors on many platforms.

: >: and if in effects is more simplest to decompile delphi
: >: respect at C.
: >
: I do not know what you mean with "decompile".
: If you are already familiar with C, basic C++ will be
: easier to learn than Delphi (but C++ has many more
: features and is complex to learn...).
: decompiler:
: the reverse operation to that of a compiler
: I asked for know if c++ is more protect the code

Decompiling C++ or Delphi code is similarly difficult.
What can make decompilation easier depends more on
compilation options (e.g. in both languages, you can
include debugging symbols, which obviously would help
reverse-engineer your application).

--
http://ivan.vecerina.com/contact/?subject=NG_POST <- email contact form
Brainbench MVP for C++ <http://www.brainbench.com

May 5 '07 #4

P: n/a
"Ivan Vecerina" <_I*******************@ivan.vecerina.comwrites:
"de" <no****@nospam.comwrote in message
news:1l******************************@40tude.net.. .
: but for c++ is possible to programmer and compile with freeware
: software, instead with delphi I must to acquire their software?

Delphi is a language supported by Borland only.
Free Pascal compiles the same Object Pascal dialect as Delphi, and supports
many of the same units. 100% Delphi compatibility is a goal.

<http://www.freepascal.org>

sherm--

--
Web Hosting by West Virginians, for West Virginians: http://wv-www.net
Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
May 5 '07 #5

P: n/a
On 2007-05-05 09:44, de wrote:
between c and c++ I have understood is preferibile c++, but always?
and regarding C# what changes?
No, it's really not that simple, I would say that if you are new to
programming then C++ is definitely preferable over C. If you on the
other hand have 20 years of experience with C and have never used C++
then C is a better language to use. Or put another way, what language
you should use depends on a lot of things, what prior experiences you
have, what type of application you are going to develop, on what
platforms the application will run and so on.

C# might be a good choice if you are new to programming and want to
target the Windows platform and have no need to work with legacy
applications.

Having said that I think that you can never waste your time by learning
C++ since it's an incredibly powerful, platform independent, multi-
paradigm programming language and lots of what you learn from it will be
applicable on other languages.
Moreover which are the main differences between the rad Turbo C++, Borland
Studio6 C++, Visual Study .NET, Visual C++?
I think (correct me if I'm wrong) that both Turbo C++ and Borland
Studio6 C++ are Borland products, I've never personally used any of them
but I know some people who thinks it's still the best development
environment for C++. Visual C++ is part of Visual Studio .Net, notice
however that a newer version is available, Visual Studio 2005, and you
can download Visual C++ 2005 Express for free.

Since I've never used the Borland products I can't compare them but I
believe that most will agree that Visual C++ 2005 is preferable for C++
development under Windows (and gcc4 for Linux).
and with all they is possible to make applications that turn with win XP,
Linux and winodows Vista?
No, but you can use them to develop code that will compile on all of
them. Notice also that all applications (except some really old ones)
that run on XP will run on Vista, and the reverse is probably also true.

--
Erik Wikström
May 5 '07 #6

P: n/a
de
Il Sat, 05 May 2007 10:09:35 GMT, Erik Wikström ha scritto:
On 2007-05-05 09:44, de wrote:
>between c and c++ I have understood is preferibile c++, but always?
and regarding C# what changes?

No, it's really not that simple, I would say that if you are new to
programming then C++ is definitely preferable over C. If you on the
other hand have 20 years of experience with C and have never used C++
then C is a better language to use. Or put another way, what language
you should use depends on a lot of things, what prior experiences you
have, what type of application you are going to develop, on what
platforms the application will run and so on.

C# might be a good choice if you are new to programming and want to
target the Windows platform and have no need to work with legacy
applications.

I am newbie; time ago (four year ago) I used for hobby visual basic,
that I found very simple;
now I want used some similar (Rad and simple);
for make programm with grid, images, et similar
(example to achive and manage photos, book etc..);
software will be used on windows but, also if isn't a priority,
i like if is possible to compile and use also on linux.
is important that the software isn't simple to decompile (reverse code).
if I like this hobby I can decide to make it
how professional if possible, and want to use a robust language.

>Moreover which are the main differences between the rad Turbo C++, Borland
Studio6 C++, Visual Study .NET, Visual C++?

I think (correct me if I'm wrong) that both Turbo C++ and Borland
Studio6 C++ are Borland products,
yes

Since I've never used the Borland products I can't compare them but I
believe that most will agree that Visual C++ 2005 is preferable for C++
development under Windows (and gcc4 for Linux).
with visual c++ is possible to make product for linux (using gcc4)?
May 6 '07 #7

P: n/a
On 2007-05-06 20:40, de wrote:
Il Sat, 05 May 2007 10:09:35 GMT, Erik Wikström ha scritto:
>On 2007-05-05 09:44, de wrote:
>>between c and c++ I have understood is preferibile c++, but always?
and regarding C# what changes?

No, it's really not that simple, I would say that if you are new to
programming then C++ is definitely preferable over C. If you on the
other hand have 20 years of experience with C and have never used C++
then C is a better language to use. Or put another way, what language
you should use depends on a lot of things, what prior experiences you
have, what type of application you are going to develop, on what
platforms the application will run and so on.

C# might be a good choice if you are new to programming and want to
target the Windows platform and have no need to work with legacy
applications.


I am newbie; time ago (four year ago) I used for hobby visual basic,
that I found very simple;
From what I understand that kind of Visual Basic is now deprecated by
MS, the new VB is more like C#.
software will be used on windows but, also if isn't a priority,
i like if is possible to compile and use also on linux.
You could use Qt, or some other cross platform GUI library if you want
to make it available on other platforms than Windows.
is important that the software isn't simple to decompile (reverse code).
Can't see why really, I'm sorry to say but I can't see you coming up
with such a revolutionary solution that someone would go to the trouble
to try to reverse engineer it. However rest assured, I know of no good
decompilers that can get useful give you useful information about how an
application works. When all the variable, class and function names are
gone it's hard to tell what anything but the most trivial program does.
if I like this hobby I can decide to make it
how professional if possible, and want to use a robust language.
Don't know about "robust" but C++ will not be obsolete anytime soon and
it's a very powerful language.
>Since I've never used the Borland products I can't compare them but I
believe that most will agree that Visual C++ 2005 is preferable for C++
development under Windows (and gcc4 for Linux).

with visual c++ is possible to make product for linux (using gcc4)?
You can write code in VC++ that will compile under gcc, and if you are
careful with your dependencies and use platform independent libraries
you can also compile the code on Linux systems.

--
Erik Wikström
May 6 '07 #8

P: n/a
>>C# might be a good choice if you are new to programming and want to
>>target the Windows platform and have no need to work with legacy
applications.


I am newbie; time ago (four year ago) I used for hobby visual basic,
that I found very simple;

From what I understand that kind of Visual Basic is now deprecated by
MS, the new VB is more like C#.
so the code most similar at VB is Visual C#;
>software will be used on windows but, also if isn't a priority,
i like if is possible to compile and use also on linux.

You could use Qt, or some other cross platform GUI library if you want
to make it available on other platforms than Windows.
one application make in C# can run on linux with small change?
May 7 '07 #9

P: n/a
On 2007-05-07 20:05, nawfer wrote:
>>>C# might be a good choice if you are new to programming and want to
target the Windows platform and have no need to work with legacy
applications.
I am newbie; time ago (four year ago) I used for hobby visual basic,
that I found very simple;

From what I understand that kind of Visual Basic is now deprecated by
MS, the new VB is more like C#.

so the code most similar at VB is Visual C#;
No, the new VB (VB.Net) is more like C# than VB6 which was probably what
you tested.
>>software will be used on windows but, also if isn't a priority,
i like if is possible to compile and use also on linux.

You could use Qt, or some other cross platform GUI library if you want
to make it available on other platforms than Windows.

one application make in C# can run on linux with small change?
Don't know, there's the Mono-project for C# on Linux but there is still
a lot of things not implemented in Mono. What I meant was that if you
use C++ and use a cross-platform framework and take care not to
introduce any platform dependent constructs then you should be able to
just compile the code on any platform which supports C++ and whatever
framework you used.

--
Erik Wikström
May 7 '07 #10

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