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sorting K+1 vectors with NlogN comparisons not (K+1)NlogN

P: n/a
Hi,

Suppose there is a vector of objects of class A, i.e., std::vector<A>
vec_A(N); The class A satisifies all the STL vector requirements.

Now I wish to add some attributes for each of the objects in the
vector vec_A. Suppose there are K attributes to be added. For each of
the attributes I define K vectors of appropriate types. Say, the
attributes have types type1, type2, ..., typeK. So I define
std::vector<type1> attr1(vec_A.size());
std::vector<type2> attr2(vec_A.size());
....
std::vector<typeK> attrK(vec_A.size());

The important condition is that the object at location i in vec_A has
attributes at location i in attr1, attr2, ..., attrK.

Now suppose I need to sort the vector vec_A on basis of some of the
attributes. How can it be efficiently (both in terms of time and
memory) done so that the above mentioned condition is satisfied?

One approach that I used is to have copies of the basis attributes
vectors. Then sort vec_A, attr1, attr2, ..., attrK using the copies.
But this involves on average (K+1)*NlogN comparisons of the basis
attributes. Additionally I am creating copies of the basis attributes.
So this approach seems quite unsatisfactory. Is it possible to have
only NlogN comparisons? Best if no copies of the basis attributes are
involved.

Of course, one can define class A to have the attributes as its
fields. But then its not general and flexible enough. In that case,
one loses the flexibilty of having one attribute, two attributes and
so on.

One example of such a need can be the case where class A represent a
vertex of a graph, and the attributes are different properties of a
vertex.
Thanks & regards,
Pratyush
Jul 19 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
On 10 Nov 2003 00:24:27 -0800, pk****@noida.atrenta.com (Pratyush)
wrote:
Hi,

Suppose there is a vector of objects of class A, i.e., std::vector<A>
vec_A(N); The class A satisifies all the STL vector requirements.

Now I wish to add some attributes for each of the objects in the
vector vec_A. Suppose there are K attributes to be added. For each of
the attributes I define K vectors of appropriate types. Say, the
attributes have types type1, type2, ..., typeK. So I define
std::vector<type1> attr1(vec_A.size());
std::vector<type2> attr2(vec_A.size());
...
std::vector<typeK> attrK(vec_A.size());

The important condition is that the object at location i in vec_A has
attributes at location i in attr1, attr2, ..., attrK.
Parallel vectors are rarely a good idea!

Now suppose I need to sort the vector vec_A on basis of some of the
attributes. How can it be efficiently (both in terms of time and
memory) done so that the above mentioned condition is satisfied?
Create a vector containing (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, ..., vec_A.size() - 1). Now
sort that, using a sorting criteria that looks up elements in the A
vector. e.g.

struct IndexSort
{
private:
//...
//probably begin iterators for the relevent attibute vectors.
//or references to those containers
public:
typedef bool result_type;
typedef int first_argument_type;
typedef int second_argument_type;

IndexSort(/*probably begin iterators for the relevent attibute
vectors*/)
{}

bool operator()(first_argument_type lhs,
second_argument_type rhs) const
{
//lhs and rhs give the index in the vectors to compare.
return true; //perform comparison
}
};

std::sort(indexvec.begin(), indexvec.end(), IndexSort(/*args*/));

Now you have a vector like:

(10, 99, 2, 7, ...)

You now use this to rearrange all of your parallel vectors into the
correct order. e.g.

template <class It, class RanIt>
void index_shuffle(It begin, It end, RanIt toSort)
{
using std::iter_swap;
RanIt it = toSort;
while(begin != end)
{
iter_swap(it, toSort + *begin);
++begin;
++it;
}
}

calling it on each:
index_shuffle(indexvec.begin(), indexvec.end(), vec_A.begin());
index_shuffle(indexvec.begin(), indexvec.end(), attr1.begin());
....
index_shuffle(indexvec.begin(), indexvec.end(), attrK.begin());

One approach that I used is to have copies of the basis attributes
vectors. Then sort vec_A, attr1, attr2, ..., attrK using the copies.
But this involves on average (K+1)*NlogN comparisons of the basis
attributes. Additionally I am creating copies of the basis attributes.
So this approach seems quite unsatisfactory. Is it possible to have
only NlogN comparisons? Best if no copies of the basis attributes are
involved.
Sort a vector of indices then, applying the reordering to each vector
in turn. NlogN comparisons as required.

Of course, one can define class A to have the attributes as its
fields. But then its not general and flexible enough. In that case,
one loses the flexibilty of having one attribute, two attributes and
so on.

One example of such a need can be the case where class A represent a
vertex of a graph, and the attributes are different properties of a
vertex.


There are many ways to give flexible attribute lists. At the very
least you have:
struct AHolder
{
A a;
type1 attr1;
//...
typek attrk;
};

A runtime map<string, type>, or compile time template parameters
(typelist, tuple, etc.) are alternatives.

Incidently, you can find a graphs library here:

http://www.boost.org/libs/graph/doc/..._contents.html

Tom
Jul 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
tom_usenet wrote:

[snip - how to sort many parallel vectors?]
Now suppose I need to sort the vector vec_A on basis of some of the
attributes. How can it be efficiently (both in terms of time and
memory) done so that the above mentioned condition is satisfied?
Create a vector containing (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, ..., vec_A.size() - 1). Now
sort that, using a sorting criteria that looks up elements in the A
vector. e.g.


[snip] Now you have a vector like:

(10, 99, 2, 7, ...)

You now use this to rearrange all of your parallel vectors into the
correct order. e.g.


Once you have this vector (v), you don't need to rearrange the others.
The ith element in this vector refers to element vec_A[v[i]] with
attributes attr*[v[i]].

/david

--
Andre, a simple peasant, had only one thing on his mind as he crept
along the East wall: 'Andre, creep... Andre, creep... Andre, creep.'
-- unknown
Jul 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
David Rubin <bo***********@nomail.com> wrote in message news:<3F***************@nomail.com>...
tom_usenet wrote:

[snip - how to sort many parallel vectors?]
Now suppose I need to sort the vector vec_A on basis of some of the
attributes. How can it be efficiently (both in terms of time and
memory) done so that the above mentioned condition is satisfied?


Create a vector containing (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, ..., vec_A.size() - 1). Now
sort that, using a sorting criteria that looks up elements in the A
vector. e.g.


[snip]
Now you have a vector like:

(10, 99, 2, 7, ...)

You now use this to rearrange all of your parallel vectors into the
correct order. e.g.


Once you have this vector (v), you don't need to rearrange the others.
The ith element in this vector refers to element vec_A[v[i]] with
attributes attr*[v[i]].

/david

Thanks a lot guys. I think if the usage is such that we need to access
the attributes too often then its better to rearrange the vectors. In
this case, instead of two deferences we will be doing one. Otherwise
we can use indexing as suggested by David.

Thanks & regards,
Pratyush
Jul 19 '05 #4

P: n/a
tom_usenet <to********@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<60********************************@4ax.com>. ..
On 10 Nov 2003 00:24:27 -0800, pk****@noida.atrenta.com (Pratyush)
wrote:
Hi, [snip]
Now suppose I need to sort the vector vec_A on basis of some of the
attributes. How can it be efficiently (both in terms of time and
memory) done so that the above mentioned condition is satisfied?
Create a vector containing (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, ..., vec_A.size() - 1). Now
sort that, using a sorting criteria that looks up elements in the A
vector. e.g.

struct IndexSort
{

[snip] };

std::sort(indexvec.begin(), indexvec.end(), IndexSort(/*args*/));

Now you have a vector like:

(10, 99, 2, 7, ...)

You now use this to rearrange all of your parallel vectors into the
correct order. e.g.

template <class It, class RanIt>
void index_shuffle(It begin, It end, RanIt toSort)
{
using std::iter_swap;
RanIt it = toSort;
while(begin != end)
{
iter_swap(it, toSort + *begin);
++begin;
++it;
}
}
It seems that this index_shuffle algorithm is not correct. For
example, consider the following:

int vi[] = {5,3};

// vector containing (0,1)
vector<int> indexvec(2); indexvec[0] = 0; indexvec[1] = 1;

// sort using index sort mechanism as suggested by tom_usenet
std::sort(indexvec.begin(), indexvec.end(), IndexSort(/*args*/))

//now indexvec contains (1,0)

index_shuffle(indexvec.begin(), indexvec.end(), vi);

// this step will produce vi containing (5,3) and not (3,5)...
//
// basically the while-loop in index-shuffle will loop twice.
// in the first loop it will do iter_swap(vi, vi+1).
// in the second loop it will do iter_swap(vi+1, vi).
But anyways thanks for the pointer. I now need to write the correct
index_shuffle algorithm. By sorting the indices, we are creating a
permutation of those indices. It seems one needs to take into account
the cycles in a permutation while performing the index_shuffle.

[snip]
Jul 19 '05 #5

P: n/a
On 11 Nov 2003 01:02:02 -0800, pk****@noida.atrenta.com (Pratyush)
wrote:
It seems that this index_shuffle algorithm is not correct. For
example, consider the following:

int vi[] = {5,3};

// vector containing (0,1)
vector<int> indexvec(2); indexvec[0] = 0; indexvec[1] = 1;

// sort using index sort mechanism as suggested by tom_usenet
std::sort(indexvec.begin(), indexvec.end(), IndexSort(/*args*/))

//now indexvec contains (1,0)

index_shuffle(indexvec.begin(), indexvec.end(), vi);

// this step will produce vi containing (5,3) and not (3,5)...
//
// basically the while-loop in index-shuffle will loop twice.
// in the first loop it will do iter_swap(vi, vi+1).
// in the second loop it will do iter_swap(vi+1, vi).
Yes, you're right, I'm afraid I didn't put much thought into it.

But anyways thanks for the pointer. I now need to write the correct
index_shuffle algorithm. By sorting the indices, we are creating a
permutation of those indices. It seems one needs to take into account
the cycles in a permutation while performing the index_shuffle.


This can't be done in place without making it at least O(n log n), and
more likely O(n*n). You have to find the disjoint cycles and then
rotate them (this takes me back to discrete maths and combinatorics!).
So I suggest you do a copy algorithm:

#include <algorithm>

template <class FwdIt1, class RanIt, class FwdIt2>
void index_shuffle_copy(FwdIt1 indexBegin, FwdIt1 indexEnd, RanIt
source, FwdIt2 output)
{
using std::iter_swap;
while(indexBegin != indexEnd)
{
*output = *(source + *indexBegin);
++indexBegin;
++output;
}
}

Unfortunately this annoyingly makes you copy everything. You can of
course do a swap at the end to minimize copying.

Tom
Jul 19 '05 #6

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