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Learning C++

P: n/a
Hi everyone,

I am learning c++ using the deitel c++ how to program 4th edition. I am
currently finishing chapter 7 and I am pretty blown away. I am not really
having trouble understanding the code or concepts it just seems like a ton
to learn/remember. I was hoping some of you more experience c++ programmers
could give me some tips on online resources for code and books that I should
buy to accompany the ones I have now (the deitel book and c++ programming
for linux).

Thanks in advance,

Shock
Jul 19 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a

"Shock" <sh*****@charter.net> wrote in message
news:vp************@corp.supernews.com...
Hi everyone,

I am learning c++ using the deitel c++ how to program 4th edition.
IMO a good quality text.
I am
currently finishing chapter 7 and I am pretty blown away. I am not really
having trouble understanding the code or concepts it just seems like a ton
to learn/remember.
Your perception is accurate. C++ is a very large language
(compared to C for example). I don't think anyone can
'remember' all of it, that's why we have so many books
around. I own hundreds of programming books, probably
around 20-25 are specifically about C++, its standard
library, and C++ design and usage techniques. And I'm
saving my nickels to buy more... :-)

There are also some good trade publications, such as
C/C++ Users Journal (www.cuj.com) which have good articles
'from the trenches', written by practicing professionals.
I was hoping some of you more experience c++ programmers
could give me some tips on online resources for code and books that I should buy to accompany the ones I have now (the deitel book and c++ programming
for linux).


http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/

http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~a...acllc-c++.html
Sections 6,7,8 probably of particular interest to you.

C++ is a platform-independent language, so your host
platform doesn't really matter, as long as a C++
implementation for it is available.

And remember, we're all here, willing to assist
when you want/need it.

Good luck!

HTH,
-Mike
Jul 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Fri, 17 Oct 2003 17:48:55 -0500, Shock wrote:

* snip request for book recommendations *
Thanks in advance,

Shock


Hey Shock,

1) The C++ Standard Library by Josuttis
http://www.bookpool.com/.x/3zn8pi9590/sm/0201379260
2) Design Patterns by Gamma, et. al.
http://www.bookpool.com/.x/3zn8pijbfr/sm/0201633612
--
Benny
Remove your rose colored glasses before e-mailing me

Jul 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Benny Hill" <benny_hill3@your_rose_colored_glassesyahoo.com> wrote in
message
news:pan.2003.10.17.23.38.04.682018@your_rose_colo red_glassesyahoo.com...
On Fri, 17 Oct 2003 17:48:55 -0500, Shock wrote:

* snip request for book recommendations *
Thanks in advance,

Shock


Hey Shock,

1) The C++ Standard Library by Josuttis
http://www.bookpool.com/.x/3zn8pi9590/sm/0201379260
2) Design Patterns by Gamma, et. al.
http://www.bookpool.com/.x/3zn8pijbfr/sm/0201633612


While both are excellent books that imo every C++ coder
should eventually own, I feel they're rather 'advanced'
for the novice, as 'Shock' seems to be.

Shock: Do note these titles for later.

-Mike
Jul 19 '05 #4

P: n/a
In article <vp************@corp.supernews.com>,
Shock <sh*****@charter.net> wrote:
Hi everyone,

I am learning c++ using the deitel c++ how to program 4th edition. I am
currently finishing chapter 7 and I am pretty blown away. I am not really
having trouble understanding the code or concepts it just seems like a ton
to learn/remember. I was hoping some of you more experience c++ programmers
could give me some tips on online resources for code and books that I should
buy to accompany the ones I have now (the deitel book and c++ programming
for linux).


Effective C++ is often recommended but I'll give it a particular plug for someone
at your level (knows a bit but is starting to feel lost). Meyer's approach of
explaining why you should and shouldn't do certain things gave me a much better
understanding of what some features of C++ were there for. My understanding of
what virtual functions do and what problems they try to solve was improved by his
example of a particular bit of hard to maintain code that is made much easier with
virtual functions. After reading that I actually understood why I should use them,
not just how to use them. Don't really *get* friend functions? Read up on when
you should use friend functions and when you should use member functions.

If it's too advanced for you now then put it aside and come back to it later.

Alan
--
Defendit numerus
Jul 19 '05 #5

P: n/a
Thanks everybody. I got a lot of good resources and books recommendations.
I have to say that I have done visual basic, php, javascript, cobol (yuck),
ada, and a few other languages and I like c++ the best. I am looking
forward to using your recommendations and getting better and better.

Thanks again,

Shock

"Alan Morgan" <am*****@Xenon.Stanford.EDU> wrote in message
news:bm**********@Xenon.Stanford.EDU...
In article <vp************@corp.supernews.com>,
Shock <sh*****@charter.net> wrote:
Hi everyone,

I am learning c++ using the deitel c++ how to program 4th edition. I am
currently finishing chapter 7 and I am pretty blown away. I am not reallyhaving trouble understanding the code or concepts it just seems like a tonto learn/remember. I was hoping some of you more experience c++ programmerscould give me some tips on online resources for code and books that I shouldbuy to accompany the ones I have now (the deitel book and c++ programming
for linux).
Effective C++ is often recommended but I'll give it a particular plug for

someone at your level (knows a bit but is starting to feel lost). Meyer's approach of explaining why you should and shouldn't do certain things gave me a much better understanding of what some features of C++ were there for. My understanding of what virtual functions do and what problems they try to solve was improved by his example of a particular bit of hard to maintain code that is made much easier with virtual functions. After reading that I actually understood why I should use them, not just how to use them. Don't really *get* friend functions? Read up on when you should use friend functions and when you should use member functions.

If it's too advanced for you now then put it aside and come back to it later.
Alan
--
Defendit numerus

Jul 19 '05 #6

P: n/a

"Shock" <sh*****@charter.net> wrote in message
news:vp************@corp.supernews.com...
Hi everyone,

I am learning c++ using the deitel c++ how to program 4th edition. I am
currently finishing chapter 7 and I am pretty blown away. I am not really
having trouble understanding the code or concepts it just seems like a ton
to learn/remember. I was hoping some of you more experience c++ programmers could give me some tips on online resources for code and books that I should buy to accompany the ones I have now (the deitel book and c++ programming
for linux).


In addition to the online version of the C++ FAQ, you should also purchase
the book C++ FAQs by Cline. It's bigger and has more stuff than the online
version. A great resource, easy and succinct.
Jul 19 '05 #7

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