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good hard copy c reference

P: n/a
Hi all,

I spend a quite bit of time each day traveling to work on public
transport and thought it might be nice to read through a c standards
book during that time.

I I have the Herbert Schildt C complete reference which I have been
told many times is a pile of crap so I don't really want to start
reading it.

I was wondering which hard copy (meaning a book) C reference is
recommended. Something with code examples would be nice but anything
good that you know about would be appreciated.

Kind Regards,
Anthony Irwin
Mar 22 '07 #1
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12 Replies


P: n/a
Anthony Irwin wrote:
>
I was wondering which hard copy (meaning a book) C reference is
recommended. Something with code examples would be nice but anything
good that you know about would be appreciated.
K&R2.

--
Ian Collins.
Mar 22 '07 #2

P: n/a
Anthony Irwin wrote:
>
I spend a quite bit of time each day traveling to work on public
transport and thought it might be nice to read through a c standards
book during that time.

I I have the Herbert Schildt C complete reference which I have been
told many times is a pile of crap so I don't really want to start
reading it.

I was wondering which hard copy (meaning a book) C reference is
recommended. Something with code examples would be nice but anything
good that you know about would be appreciated.
The C standard part is fine, except I understand he omitted a
page. However it is an obsolete standard today (C90 rather than
C99). The crap is the part Schildt wrote.

--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Mar 22 '07 #3

P: n/a
CBFalconer said:
Anthony Irwin wrote:
>>
I spend a quite bit of time each day traveling to work on public
transport and thought it might be nice to read through a c standards
book during that time.

I I have the Herbert Schildt C complete reference which I have been
told many times is a pile of crap so I don't really want to start
reading it.

I was wondering which hard copy (meaning a book) C reference is
recommended. Something with code examples would be nice but anything
good that you know about would be appreciated.

The C standard part is fine,
No, it isn't. You're referring to his "Annotated ANSI C Standard",
whereas Mr Irwin is referring to his "C - The Complete Reference".
However it is an obsolete standard today (C90 rather than
C99).
No, it isn't. C90 is still the de facto standard in the C programming
world. C99 hasn't replaced C90 any more than skipping has replaced
running.
The crap is the part Schildt wrote.
But I cannot bring myself to disagree with you here.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Mar 22 '07 #4

P: n/a
Anthony Irwin <no****@noemailhere.nowherewrote:
I spend a quite bit of time each day traveling to work on public
transport and thought it might be nice to read through a c standards
book during that time.
<http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0470845732.html>

Richard
Mar 22 '07 #5

P: n/a
On Thu, 22 Mar 2007 14:58:22 +1000, Anthony Irwin wrote:
>I spend a quite bit of time each day traveling to work on public
transport and thought it might be nice to read through a c standards
book during that time.
Harbison & Steele 'C: A Reference Manual'.
A good introductory C book (but not a reference) is Kochan
'Programming in C'.

Best regards,
Roland Pibinger
Mar 22 '07 #6

P: n/a
Ian Collins wrote:
Anthony Irwin wrote:
>I was wondering which hard copy (meaning a book) C reference is
recommended. Something with code examples would be nice but anything
good that you know about would be appreciated.
K&R2.
Hi,

I already have k&r2 and still going through it, I quite like it so far.

I also got programming pearls se by Jon Bentley which I have not gown
through yet but I hope its a good read. Has anyone had any experience
with it?

Kind Regards,
Anthony Irwin
Mar 22 '07 #7

P: n/a
Anthony Irwin wrote:
I also got programming pearls se by Jon Bentley which I have not gown
through yet but I hope its a good read. Has anyone had any experience
with it?
S'excellent.

--
Chris Dollin
RIP John "BNF, Fortran, FP" Backus 3Dec1924 - 17Mar2007

Hewlett-Packard Limited registered Office: Cain Road, Bracknell, Berks RG12 1HN
Registered No: 690597 England

Mar 22 '07 #8

P: n/a
However it is an obsolete standard today (C90 rather than C99).
Too bad that today not even gcc is a completely C99-conforming compiler.
http://gcc.gnu.org/c99status.html

According to
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/C_Progr...es_of_C#_ref-0, there is
apparently only one working C99 compiler, and I've never heard about it
anywhere else.
Mar 22 '07 #9

P: n/a
On 22 Mar, 04:58, Anthony Irwin <nos...@noemailhere.nowherewrote:
I spend a quite bit of time each day traveling to work on public
transport and thought it might be nice to read through a c standards
book during that time.
It's not strictly a C standards book, but once you've worked your way
through the other suggestions, I'd suggest a thorough read of Peter
van der Linden's "Expert C Programming - Deep C Secrets" (ISBN
013177429-8). IMHO, it's useful, interesting, entertaining, and
amusing, which is more than can be said of a lot of tech books.

Mar 22 '07 #10

P: n/a
Anthony Irwin wrote:
>...which hard copy (meaning a book) C reference
is recommended. Something with code examples
would be nice but anything good that you know
about would be appreciated.
"C, a Reference Manual" - Harbison & Steele

With a different focus:

"The Standard C Library" - Plauger

Or the standard itself from the ANSI store.
($30 when I bought it last year.)
Not what a literary critic would call "engaging"
or "riveting", but interesting nevertheless. ;)

Roberto Waltman

[ Please reply to the group,
return address is invalid ]
Mar 22 '07 #11

P: n/a
Army1987 wrote:
>
>However it is an obsolete standard today (C90 rather than C99).

Too bad that today not even gcc is a completely C99-conforming
compiler. http://gcc.gnu.org/c99status.html

According to
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/C_Progr...es_of_C#_ref-0,
there is apparently only one working C99 compiler, and I've never
heard about it anywhere else.
Practically speaking, there probably does not exist a working C90
compiler, in that all software has bugs, possibly undiscovered.

Please do not remove attributions for material you quote. Those
are the initial lines that say "joe wrote:" or similar.

--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Mar 23 '07 #12

P: n/a
The C Programming Language

"Anthony Irwin" <no****@noemailhere.nowhere>
??????:et**********@news-01.bur.connect.com.au...
Hi all,

I spend a quite bit of time each day traveling to work on public transport
and thought it might be nice to read through a c standards book during
that time.

I I have the Herbert Schildt C complete reference which I have been told
many times is a pile of crap so I don't really want to start reading it.

I was wondering which hard copy (meaning a book) C reference is
recommended. Something with code examples would be nice but anything good
that you know about would be appreciated.

Kind Regards,
Anthony Irwin

Mar 23 '07 #13

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