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Book review

P: n/a
Hello all,

Im some way in C and i have to start on C++ to. I want your opinions on
Teach yourself C++ in 21 days by Jessi Liberty. Can I go with it as my
first book are are there better ones?

Thanks to all.

--
Email: The handle, (dot seperated), at gmail dot com.
Mar 14 '07 #1
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14 Replies


P: n/a
On 14 Mar, 11:52, At_sea_with_C <blindal...@dev.null.invalidwrote:
Hello all,

Im some way in C and i have to start on C++ to. I want your opinions on
Teach yourself C++ in 21 days by Jessi Liberty. Can I go with it as my
first book are are there better ones?

Thanks to all.

--
Email: The handle, (dot seperated), at gmail dot com.
If you want to learn C++ with a very good book try:
C++ How To Program 5th ed. by Deitel&Deitel
it's very well-written!
Enjoy

Mar 14 '07 #2

P: n/a
On Mar 14, 10:52 am, At_sea_with_C <blindal...@dev.null.invalid>
wrote:
Hello all,

Im some way in C and i have to start on C++ to. I want your opinions on
Teach yourself C++ in 21 days by Jessi Liberty. Can I go with it as my
first book are are there better ones?
A colleague has this book, I found some mistakes in it on a cursory
examination, and it is somewhat out of date. I know the "in 21 days"
name is because there is a series of such books, but really the title
does not inspire confidence that the author or publishers grasp the
true difficulty of learning C++ !

"Accelerated C++" by Koenig & Moo is the book many of the greybeards
on this group recommend, not read it myself but apparently it teaches C
++ concepts first and C-style low-level stuff later, which approach
has something to recommend it.
Mar 14 '07 #3

P: n/a
On 14 Mar, 12:38, "tragomaskhalos" <dave.du.verg...@logicacmg.com>
wrote:
On Mar 14, 10:52 am, At_sea_with_C <blindal...@dev.null.invalid>
wrote:
Hello all,
Im some way in C and i have to start on C++ to. I want your opinions on
Teach yourself C++ in 21 days by Jessi Liberty. Can I go with it as my
first book are are there better ones?

A colleague has this book, I found some mistakes in it on a cursory
examination, and it is somewhat out of date. I know the "in 21 days"
name is because there is a series of such books, but really the title
does not inspire confidence that the author or publishers grasp the
true difficulty of learning C++ !

"Accelerated C++" by Koenig & Moo is the book many of the greybeards
on this group recommend, not read it myself but apparently it teaches C
++ concepts first and C-style low-level stuff later, which approach
has something to recommend it.
yes you give him a good advice but the questions are:
how many time I must spend to learn the language?
Do give me, that book, a full complete view of the language?

However I think that as the C++ is a complex language (not like
Java...) should be
better to learn it with a complete and "not speed" book and spending
lot time
but this is only my opinion...

Mar 14 '07 #4

P: n/a
At_sea_with_C wrote:
Hello all,

Im some way in C and i have to start on C++ to. I want your opinions on
Teach yourself C++ in 21 days by Jessi Liberty. Can I go with it as my
first book are are there better ones?

Thanks to all.
I haven't yet read the book that you have. I started with The C++
Programming Language (Special Edition) by Bjarne Stroustrup. It is a
fine book and a good reference. It served me well although many claimed
that the book is confusing. This may be due to the fact that this book
is not a crash course and strives to present every aspect of C++. So
this one is my recommendation.

Many may also suggest Accelerated C++ by Koenig & Moo. I personally
haven't read through it yet so I can't give you a recommendation. But
from various reviews it seems to be a better book than the one you
currently have.

Regards,
Ben
Mar 14 '07 #5

P: n/a
At_sea_with_C wrote:
Hello all,

Im some way in C and i have to start on C++ to. I want your opinions on
Teach yourself C++ in 21 days by Jessi Liberty. Can I go with it as my
first book are are there better ones?

Thanks to all.
You can find some c++ book reviews at accu.org:
http://accu.org/index.php/book_revie...t&term=C%2b%2b

or there's a list at the FAQ:
http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/

You may also want to take a look at Bruce Eckel's Thinking in C++; vols
1 and 2 are available for free download at the author's website.
Mar 14 '07 #6

P: n/a
nw
Im some way in C and i have to start on C++ to. I want your opinions on
Teach yourself C++ in 21 days by Jessi Liberty. Can I go with it as my
first book are are there better ones?
I strongly recommend "Accelerated C++". I relearned C++ from this book
after programming C++ badly for a couple of years. It makes you learn C
++ "the right way" and requires almost no prior programming experience
(it's also short!). Some of your C knowledge may hinder you in
learning C++, it did me, this book should help you get over those
problems. Accelerated C++ also teaches you the STL right from the
start, in C++ I find it very important to be confident with the STL in
order to write good (or at least better) code.

Mar 14 '07 #7

P: n/a
On Mar 14, 7:05 am, "josh" <xdevel2...@yahoo.comwrote:
If you want to learn C++ with a very good book try:
C++ How To Program 5th ed. by Deitel&Deitel
it's very well-written!
I haven't seen the 5th edition, but the 3rd was given a negative
review at ACCU:

http://accu.org/index.php/book_revie...22766110593287

I, too, would recommend to you _Accelerated C++_ by Koenig and Moo.

Cheers! --M

Mar 14 '07 #8

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On Mar 14, 8:11 am, "mlimber" <mlim...@gmail.comwrote:
On Mar 14, 7:05 am, "josh" <xdevel2...@yahoo.comwrote:
If you want to learn C++ with a very good book try:
C++ How To Program 5th ed. by Deitel&Deitel
it's very well-written!

I haven't seen the 5th edition, but the 3rd was given a negative
review at ACCU:

http://accu.org/index.php/book_revie...iew=cp003204&t...

I, too, would recommend to you _Accelerated C++_ by Koenig and Moo.

Cheers! --M
My experience tells me that the part of the answwer as to which book
to use is dependant on the application you intend to use C++ for, or
the company that requires to learn C++. I have heard of interviews
where a significant portion of the questions deal with pointers and C-
style strings (companies like EA and Microsoft). Some people would
describe these companies as "C with classes" developers, but if that
is what the potential employer wants, and you want to work for them,
you have little choice! If you are going for such an iterview, the "C+
+ How To Program" text will serve you better than the "Accelerated C+
+" text.

I use both texts for my C++ course, because they both have their
strengths. The "C++ How To Program" is the required text while the
"Accelerated C++" text is optional (I assign optional readings and
optional exercises from the text). When I can obtain/create suitable
slides for the Accelerated C++ text, I will likely switch to the other
way around.

Cheers,

Bob L.

Mar 14 '07 #9

P: n/a
On Mar 14, 8:05 am, "josh" <xdevel2...@yahoo.comwrote:
On 14 Mar, 11:52, At_sea_with_C <blindal...@dev.null.invalidwrote:
Hello all,
Im some way in C and i have to start on C++ to. I want your opinions on
Teach yourself C++ in 21 days by Jessi Liberty. Can I go with it as my
first book are are there better ones?
Thanks to all.
--
Email: The handle, (dot seperated), at gmail dot com.

If you want to learn C++ with a very good book try:
C++ How To Program 5th ed. by Deitel&Deitel
it's very well-written!
Enjoy
no! it is bad and bloated
stay away from this book

Diego

Mar 15 '07 #10

P: n/a
On 14 Mar, 16:11, "mlimber" <mlim...@gmail.comwrote:
On Mar 14, 7:05 am, "josh" <xdevel2...@yahoo.comwrote:
If you want to learn C++ with a very good book try:
C++ How To Program 5th ed. by Deitel&Deitel
it's very well-written!

I haven't seen the 5th edition, but the 3rd was given a negative
review at ACCU:

http://accu.org/index.php/book_revie...iew=cp003204&t...

I, too, would recommend to you _Accelerated C++_ by Koenig and Moo.

Cheers! --M
on accu.org also the good C++ THe Complete Reference has a bad
review ...
but I found that in a review is said >>>
"I found "C++ Primer" well written and easy to understand"
and the in another Lippman,s book there is not a good review...
so I can say:
first start with a simple well-written C++ book
second continue with a more complex book
third read, modify and write a lot of code......................

Mar 16 '07 #11

P: n/a
On 14 Mar, 17:33, "blangela" <Bob_Langel...@telus.netwrote:
On Mar 14, 8:11 am, "mlimber" <mlim...@gmail.comwrote:
On Mar 14, 7:05 am, "josh" <xdevel2...@yahoo.comwrote:
If you want to learn C++ with a very good book try:
C++ How To Program 5th ed. by Deitel&Deitel
it's very well-written!
I haven't seen the 5th edition, but the 3rd was given a negative
review at ACCU:
http://accu.org/index.php/book_revie...iew=cp003204&t...
I, too, would recommend to you _Accelerated C++_ by Koenig and Moo.
Cheers! --M

My experience tells me that the part of the answwer as to which book
to use is dependant on the application you intend to use C++ for, or
the company that requires to learn C++. I have heard of interviews
where a significant portion of the questions deal with pointers and C-
style strings (companies like EA and Microsoft). Some people would
describe these companies as "C with classes" developers, but if that
is what the potential employer wants, and you want to work for them,
you have little choice! If you are going for such an iterview, the "C+
+ How To Program" text will serve you better than the "Accelerated C+
+" text.

I use both texts for my C++ course, because they both have their
strengths. The "C++ How To Program" is the required text while the
"Accelerated C++" text is optional (I assign optional readings and
optional exercises from the text). When I can obtain/create suitable
slides for the Accelerated C++ text, I will likely switch to the other
way around.

Cheers,

Bob L.
I want to add the following fact:

on accu.org there is a review of a Ditel's book that is "Highly
Recommended":
The Complete C++ Training Course and it contains C++ How To Program
and then there is another review of the same book as alone that is not
recomended
may be different authors think different things...
I don't want to think that the same author say two different thing on
the same book!

If you go on amazon you also will find many customers reviews...many
good few bad...

Bye
Mar 16 '07 #12

P: n/a
josh wrote:
[..]
If you go on amazon you also will find many customers reviews...many
good few bad...
For reviews on C++ books I'd always prever ACCU.org over Amazon. I
would not be surprised if Amazon screens the reviews and controls how
many bad ones are published for any particular book they are selling.
Not doing that could be bad for business (books with lots of negative
reviews would simply not sell). Conclusion: if you need to know how
good/bad a C++ book is, ask C++ professionals, in a neutral setting.

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
Mar 16 '07 #13

P: n/a
"Victor Bazarov" wrote:
For reviews on C++ books I'd always prever ACCU.org over Amazon. I
would not be surprised if Amazon screens the reviews and controls how
many bad ones are published for any particular book they are selling.
Not doing that could be bad for business (books with lots of negative
reviews would simply not sell). Conclusion: if you need to know how
good/bad a C++ book is, ask C++ professionals, in a neutral setting.
Do you really think Amazon cares *which* books they sell? They are in the
business of selling books, not particular books. Their could, barely
conceivably, be exceptions if it is a book on Amazon or on Jeff Bezos or his
friends and relatives.

If I were to learn to speak the Japanese language, I would much rather get a
recommendation from someone who is learning, or recently learned Japanese,
than someone who speaks it fluently. The idea is to get the hang of it, you
can learn the subtle nuances later, *if* you survive the initial shock.

The ACCU gives bad reviews to some of my favorite books. I consider that
tidbit more useful than idle speculation that Amazon stacks the deck.
Mar 16 '07 #14

P: n/a
osmium wrote:
[..]
The ACCU gives bad reviews to some of my favorite books. I consider
that tidbit more useful than idle speculation that Amazon stacks the
deck.
That reflects more on you than on ACCU, IMO. And the idleness of my
speculation is only IYO, as well. I don't mean any offence.

V
--
Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
Mar 16 '07 #15

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