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Looking for C code for SVD

P: n/a
Hi all,

I am working on a project for industry and looking for free reliable C
code for Singular Value Decomposition (SVD).
I have the C code based from the book "Numerical recipes in C", but as
I remember, few years ago, I also used this for SVD but the obtained
results were not good. Then I changed to use SVD function in OpenCV
libs and the results were much better.
However I don't want to inlcude OPENCV into my current program this
time because it will make my program pretty big.
Would anyone out there please help?
Thanks

Mar 12 '07 #1
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2 Replies


P: n/a
A.E lover wrote:
Hi all,

I am working on a project for industry and looking for free reliable C
code for Singular Value Decomposition (SVD).
<snip>
comp.programming may be a better place for your question.

--
Ioan - Ciprian Tandau
tandau _at_ freeshell _dot_ org (hope it's not too late)
(... and that it still works...)
Mar 12 '07 #2

P: n/a
On Mar 11, 8:14 pm, "A.E lover" <aelove...@gmail.comwrote:
Hi all,

I am working on a project for industry and looking for free reliable C
code for Singular Value Decomposition (SVD).
I have the C code based from the book "Numerical recipes in C", but as
I remember, few years ago, I also used this for SVD but the obtained
results were not good. Then I changed to use SVD function in OpenCV
libs and the results were much better.
However I don't want to inlcude OPENCV into my current program this
time because it will make my program pretty big.
Would anyone out there please help?
18.16: Where and how can I get copies of all these freely
distributable
programs?

A: As the number of available programs, the number of publicly
accessible archive sites, and the number of people trying to
access them all grow, this question becomes both easier and more
difficult to answer.

There are a number of large, public-spirited archive sites out
there, such as ftp.uu.net, archive.umich.edu, oak.oakland.edu,
sumex-aim.stanford.edu, and wuarchive.wustl.edu, which have huge
amounts of software and other information all freely available.
For the FSF's GNU project, the central distribution site is
prep.ai.mit.edu . These well-known sites tend to be extremely
busy and hard to reach, but there are also numerous "mirror"
sites which try to spread the load around.

On the connected Internet, the traditional way to retrieve files
from an archive site is with anonymous ftp. For those without
ftp access, there are also several ftp-by-mail servers in
operation. More and more, the world-wide web (WWW) is being
used to announce, index, and even transfer large data files.
There are probably yet newer access methods, too.

Those are some of the easy parts of the question to answer. The
hard part is in the details -- this article cannot begin to
track or list all of the available archive sites or all of the
various ways of accessing them. If you have access to the net
at all, you probably have access to more up-to-date information
about active sites and useful access methods than this FAQ list
does.

The other easy-and-hard aspect of the question, of course, is
simply *finding* which site has what you're looking for. There
is a tremendous amount of work going on in this area, and there
are probably new indexing services springing up every day. One
of the first was "archie", and of course there are a number of
high-profile commercial net indexing and searching services such
as Alta Vista, Excite, and Yahoo.

If you have access to Usenet, see the regular postings in the
comp.sources.unix and comp.sources.misc newsgroups, which
describe the archiving policies for those groups and how to
access their archives, two of which are
ftp://gatekeeper.dec.com/pub/usenet/comp.sources.unix/ and
ftp://ftp.uu.net/usenet/comp.sources.unix/. The comp.archives
newsgroup contains numerous announcements of anonymous ftp
availability of various items. Finally, the newsgroup
comp.sources.wanted is generally a more appropriate place to
post queries for source availability, but check *its* FAQ list,
"How to find sources," before posting there.

See also questions 14.12, 18.13, and 18.15c.

Perhaps news:sci.math.num-analysis would be of some help.

SourceForge has this:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/apophenia/
(I guess that Atlas and some others have SVD also)

I get 1/2 million hits with this query:
http://www.google.com/search?client=...=Google+Search

Mar 12 '07 #3

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