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c compilation

P: n/a
how and where does the c compilation takes place?

Mar 9 '07 #1
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P: n/a
ra*********@gmail.com wrote:
how and where does the c compilation takes place?
Whenever the compiler is invoked and wherever it is present.

Mar 10 '07 #2

P: n/a
<ra*********@gmail.comwrote in message
how and where does the c compilation takes place?
If you are going to post homework questions at least put them into your own
words. No one talks like that outside of an examination paper.

You need to understnad the difference between machine language, assembly
language, and high-level languages such as C, Java, or Basic.

Then understand the difference between an interpreted and a compiled
language. To help you, an interpreter is a program that accepts the source
code to a high level language, and executes the instructions in it. It
doesn't create another program, and you cannot run the high level language
without the interpreter.

C works on an entirely different principle.
--
Free games and programming goodies.
http://www.personal.leeds.ac.uk/~bgy1mm
Mar 10 '07 #3

P: n/a
Malcolm McLean wrote:
<ra*********@gmail.comwrote in message
how and where does the c compilation takes place?
<snip>
Then understand the difference between an interpreted and a compiled
language. To help you, an interpreter is a program that accepts the source
code to a high level language, and executes the instructions in it.
No. The JVM is a counterexample.
It doesn't create another program, [ ... ]
It might in memory. Again, the JVM compiles portions of it's input
into native machine code.
and you cannot run the high level language
without the interpreter.
Lisp-machines, and IIRC, there was an experimental CPU that directly
executed Java bytecode.
C works on an entirely different principle.
Yes, but you've not addressed OP's question at all.

Mar 10 '07 #4

P: n/a
On 10 Mar 2007 01:34:48 -0800, "santosh" <sa*********@gmail.com>
wrote:
Malcolm McLean wrote:
<ra*********@gmail.comwrote in message
how and where does the c compilation takes place?
<snip>
and you cannot run the high level language
without the interpreter.

Lisp-machines, and IIRC, there was an experimental CPU that directly
executed Java bytecode.
Although Java bytecode is not "the high level language". Similarly
there was a machine that hardware (I think actually firmware) executed
the P-code used by UCSD Pascal (and I believe other front-ends).

Strictly speaking LISP machines executed a parsed (and in particular
intern'ed) form of the source, but I think most people would count
that as a non-semantically-significant difference.

And the IBM 5100 ran in firmware either BASIC (I suspect, similarly
preparsed) or APL (for which parsing would be nearly trivial).
C works on an entirely different principle.

Yes, but you've not addressed OP's question at all.
I suspect intentionally not, since he assessed it as homework.

Apr 15 '07 #5

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