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Definition of POD types

P: n/a
Could somebody please direct me to a location in the standard where
POD types are defined? That is, where in the standard is it defined
what attributes a POD type has that a non-POD hasn't? Also, what does
the acronym stand for?

Thanks,

</dib>
John Dibling
Witty banter omitted for your protection
Jul 19 '05 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 17:49:17 GMT, John Dibling <dib@substitute_my_full_last_name_here.com> wrote:
Could somebody please direct me to a location in the standard where
POD types are defined?
9/4: POD struct, POD union and POD class (the latter is a general term
for POD struct or POD union).

3.9/1: POD type.

That is, where in the standard is it defined what attributes a POD type
has that a non-POD hasn't?
It's actually opposite; see the first reference above.

Also, what does the acronym stand for?


Plain Old Datatype.

Jul 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 14:05:22 -0400, "Victor Bazarov"
<v.********@attAbi.com> wrote:
Can't you search the Standard for "POD"? <sigh>...
Of course I did. Found many references to datatypes which were
described as being POD types or non-POD types, but nowhere was the
term POD defined.
3.9/10 "Arithmetic types (3.9.1), enumeration types, pointer types,
and pointer to member types (3.9.2), and cvqualified versions of
these types (3.9.3) are collectively called scalar types. Scalar
types, POD-struct types, POD-union types (clause 9), arrays of such
types and cv-qualified versions of these types (3.9.3) are
collectively called POD types."
Saw this, but it didn't explain what common attributes correlated
these types as POD types. Especially since the desription is more
thatn somewhat self-referential, I did not find enlightenment here.
POD stands for Plain Old Data.


<click> This explains a great deal. Everything, in fact. All
questions answered. Thanks.

</dib>
John Dibling
Witty banter omitted for your protection

Jul 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 18:01:05 GMT, al***@start.no (Alf P. Steinbach)
wrote:

Plain Old Datatype.


Thanks much.

</dib>
John Dibling
Witty banter omitted for your protection

Jul 19 '05 #4

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