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EDOM

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Hi,

I came across the term EDOM in a code. What does it mean?
WD

Jul 19 '05 #1
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"Web Developer" <no****@hotmail.com> wrote...
I came across the term EDOM in a code. What does it mean?


It's a value of 'errno' variable. Indicates floating point
error -- argument is out of acceptable range (IIRC). For
example, acos(1.5) should produce errno == EDOM.

Victor
Jul 19 '05 #2

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> > It's a value of 'errno' variable.

Both 'EDOM' and 'errno' are macros, Bazarov.


Not according to C99. EDOM is a macro but errno need not be.

Stephen Howe
Jul 19 '05 #3

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> > It's a value of 'errno' variable.

Both 'EDOM' and 'errno' are macros, Bazarov.


Not according to C99. EDOM is a macro but errno need not be.

Stephen Howe
Jul 19 '05 #4

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"Stephen Howe"
It's a value of 'errno' variable.


Both 'EDOM' and 'errno' are macros, Bazarov.


Not according to C99. EDOM is a macro but errno need not be.


whats c99?

WD
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Jul 19 '05 #5

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"Stephen Howe"
It's a value of 'errno' variable.


Both 'EDOM' and 'errno' are macros, Bazarov.


Not according to C99. EDOM is a macro but errno need not be.


whats c99?

WD
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Jul 19 '05 #6

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> C99 says that "It is unspecified whether errno is a macro or
an identifier declared with external linkage. If a macro
definition is suppressed in order to access an actual object,
or a program defines an identifier with the name errno, the
behavior is undefined". Now, as for C++, see tables 26 and 95.

'errno' is a standard macro in C++. End of story.


You are not reading that right.
What if an implementation provides

"an identifier declared with external linkage."

that is not a macro? That is compliant. Did you see the word "OR"?
That means the 2nd possibility is okay.

Stephen
Jul 19 '05 #7

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"Attila Feher" <at**********@lmf.ericsson.se> wrote in message news:<bh**********@newstree.wise.edt.ericsson.se>. ..
Alexander Terekhov wrote:
[SNIP]
'errno' is a standard macro in C++. End of story.
Unfortunately it is (19.3/Table 26, Annex C/Table 95 both says MARCO).


Really? Well, I'm now ~2000 miles away from my pdfs,
so I can't check it.
Fortunately it is a macro (on my Solaris) compiling (well, precompiled) into
a thread-safe function call. :-)


Ahem. ;-)

regards,
alexander.
Jul 19 '05 #8

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