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how to become advance c programmer

P: n/a
hi all,

please send me the link of tutorial of advance programming in c.
which help me to clear all compilation problems and also help me in my
projects.

thanks,

Feb 25 '07 #1
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16 Replies


P: n/a

"vicky" <go*******@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@m58g2000cwm.googlegr oups.com...
hi all,

please send me the link of tutorial of advance programming in c.
which help me to clear all compilation problems and also help me in my
projects.
cant help you with a link, but you're by no means advanced if you can solve
compilation problems ;)
You become advanced by just making lots of things
Feb 25 '07 #2

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On Sat, 24 Feb 2007 21:58:18 -0800, vicky wrote:
hi all,

please send me the link of tutorial of advance programming in c.
which help me to clear all compilation problems and also help me in my
projects.

thanks,
http://www.amazon.com/dp/0131103628/
http://www.network-theory.co.uk/docs/gccintro/
http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/
http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/cpp/
http://www.open-std.org/JTC1/SC22/WG...docs/n1124.pdf

--
Lars Rune Nøstdal
http://nostdal.org/

Feb 25 '07 #3

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vicky wrote:
hi all,

please send me the link of tutorial of advance programming in c.
which help me to clear all compilation problems and also help me in my
projects.

thanks,
You need to be more specific.

Feb 25 '07 #4

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"vicky" <go*******@gmail.comwrote
hi all,

please send me the link of tutorial of advance programming in c.
which help me to clear all compilation problems and also help me in my
projects.
Learning to program is a bit like learning how to hold a pencil. Essential
for getting computers to do what you want, but in itself not very useful
unless you also know what you want to write.

C is quite a small language and you should be fairly competent in it within
a few weeks.

Feb 25 '07 #5

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vicky wrote:
hi all,

please send me the link of tutorial of advance programming in c.
which help me to clear all compilation problems and also help me in my
projects.

thanks,
In New York City we walk up to a policeman to ask directions. "How do I
get to Carnegie Hall?". The response: "Practice."

You get better at programming by programming. Some of the readers of
this newsgroup are as advanced as you get. Brian Kernighan, Dennis
Ritchie, PJ Plauger, et. al. post here regularly.

You are in the right place. Download the C FAQ read it often. Lurk here
in comp.lang.c and read everything. Resist the urge to respond to
everything. We are trying not be become a chat room.

Assuming you do your homework, read and practice a lot, and still have a
nagging question about C you are in luck. A carefully crafted question
about C posted here is almost guaranteed to elicit several responses.
One or more of them should be correct.

--
Joe Wright
"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."
--- Albert Einstein ---
Feb 25 '07 #6

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On Feb 25, 10:07 am, Joe Wright <joewwri...@comcast.netwrote:
vicky wrote:
hi all,
please send me the link of tutorial of advance programming in c.
which help me to clear all compilation problems and also help me in my
projects.
thanks,

In New York City we walk up to a policeman to ask directions. "How do I
get to Carnegie Hall?". The response: "Practice."

You get better at programming by programming. Some of the readers of
this newsgroup are as advanced as you get. Brian Kernighan, Dennis
Ritchie, PJ Plauger, et. al. post here regularly.
Really? Unless Brian and Dennis post using an alias I have never seen
a post by Brian in this group and Dennis seems to average about 2-3
posts per year, hardly what I would call a regular poster.

Robert Gamble

Feb 25 '07 #7

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Robert Gamble wrote:
On Feb 25, 10:07 am, Joe Wright <joewwri...@comcast.netwrote:
>vicky wrote:
>>hi all,
please send me the link of tutorial of advance programming in c.
which help me to clear all compilation problems and also help me in my
projects.
thanks,
In New York City we walk up to a policeman to ask directions. "How do I
get to Carnegie Hall?". The response: "Practice."

You get better at programming by programming. Some of the readers of
this newsgroup are as advanced as you get. Brian Kernighan, Dennis
Ritchie, PJ Plauger, et. al. post here regularly.

Really? Unless Brian and Dennis post using an alias I have never seen
a post by Brian in this group and Dennis seems to average about 2-3
posts per year, hardly what I would call a regular poster.

Robert Gamble
Well, I'm sorry you missed them. Dennis has posted here in the last few
dayy. Brian some time ago but PJ must be considered a regular. Was there
anything else? Why did you bother to respond to my response to Vicky?

--
Joe Wright
"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."
--- Albert Einstein ---
Feb 25 '07 #8

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On Feb 25, 3:24 pm, Joe Wright <joewwri...@comcast.netwrote:
Robert Gamble wrote:
On Feb 25, 10:07 am, Joe Wright <joewwri...@comcast.netwrote:
vicky wrote:
hi all,
please send me the link of tutorial of advance programming in c.
which help me to clear all compilation problems and also help me in my
projects.
thanks,
In New York City we walk up to a policeman to ask directions. "How do I
get to Carnegie Hall?". The response: "Practice."
You get better at programming by programming. Some of the readers of
this newsgroup are as advanced as you get. Brian Kernighan, Dennis
Ritchie, PJ Plauger, et. al. post here regularly.
Really? Unless Brian and Dennis post using an alias I have never seen
a post by Brian in this group and Dennis seems to average about 2-3
posts per year, hardly what I would call a regular poster.
Robert Gamble

Well, I'm sorry you missed them. Dennis has posted here in the last few
dayy.
I still wouldn't say that he posts here regularly.
Brian some time ago but PJ must be considered a regular. Was there
anything else?
No, that was it, just wondering if I was missing something or if you
just had a different definition of "posts regularly" than I did. Now
I know.
Why did you bother to respond to my response to Vicky?
Why are you such a grouch?

Robert Gamble

Feb 25 '07 #9

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Joe Wright <jo********@comcast.netwrites:
Robert Gamble wrote:
[...]
>Really? Unless Brian and Dennis post using an alias I have never
seen
a post by Brian in this group and Dennis seems to average about 2-3
posts per year, hardly what I would call a regular poster.
Well, I'm sorry you missed them. Dennis has posted here in the last
few dayy. Brian some time ago but PJ must be considered a regular.
[...]

A Google Groups search for articles by Brian Kernighan shows a grand
total of 4, none of them in comp.lang.c. One was in comp.lang.tcl,
posted in 1993. Of the others, one was in Polish music group (in
Polish) and two were in soc.culture.vietnamese; they could have been
from a different Brian Kernighan, or from someone using his name.

Dennis Ritchie does post here, but only rarely. I see 5 posts in
2003, 1 in 2004, 2 in 2005, none in 2006, and one so far in 2007.

Yes, P.J. Plauger is more or less a regular.

I'd certainly welcome more posts by any or all of them, but of course
they're under no obligation.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <* <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
Feb 25 '07 #10

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Robert Gamble wrote:
On Feb 25, 10:07 am, Joe Wright <joewwri...@comcast.netwrote:
.... snip ...
>>
You get better at programming by programming. Some of the readers
of this newsgroup are as advanced as you get. Brian Kernighan,
Dennis Ritchie, PJ Plauger, et. al. post here regularly.

Really? Unless Brian and Dennis post using an alias I have never
seen a post by Brian in this group and Dennis seems to average
about 2-3 posts per year, hardly what I would call a regular poster.
I think they lurk more than most. No need to make the newbies
hearts go pit-a-pat by regular posting on trivialities.

--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>
Feb 26 '07 #11

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Keith Thompson said:

<snip>
Dennis Ritchie does post here, but only rarely. I see 5 posts in
2003, 1 in 2004, 2 in 2005, none in 2006, and one so far in 2007.
....and he almost certainly read and replied to the 2007 article in afc
rather than clc.
Yes, P.J. Plauger is more or less a regular.
Less, I think. More of a sporadic than a regular.
I'd certainly welcome more posts by any or all of them, but of course
they're under no obligation.
Quite so.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
Feb 26 '07 #12

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On Sat, 24 Feb 2007 23:58:18 -0600, vicky wrote
(in article <11**********************@m58g2000cwm.googlegroups .com>):
hi all,

please send me the link of tutorial of advance programming in c.
Tutorials don't make you an advanced programmer, time and lots of
experience do that.

--
Randy Howard (2reply remove FOOBAR)
"The power of accurate observation is called cynicism by those
who have not got it." - George Bernard Shaw

Mar 10 '07 #13

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On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 19:34:04 +0000, Randy Howard wrote:
On Sat, 24 Feb 2007 23:58:18 -0600, vicky wrote
(in article <11**********************@m58g2000cwm.googlegroups .com>):
>hi all,

please send me the link of tutorial of advance programming in c.

Tutorials don't make you an advanced programmer, time and lots of
experience do that.
True, but reading the writings of those who have come before can help.
Simple example: many beginners use magic numbers; more experienced folks
tend to avoid them. It might take a hell of a long time before using them
really jumps up and bites you, but a little reading of some of the more
experienced folks would tell you not only not to use them, but *why* not
to use them.

Every bit helps.

--
Do not contact me at kb********@ncoldns.com
Mar 14 '07 #14

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Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 19:34:04 +0000, Randy Howard wrote:
On Sat, 24 Feb 2007 23:58:18 -0600, vicky wrote
(in article <11**********************@m58g2000cwm.googlegroups .com>):
hi all,

please send me the link of tutorial of advance programming in c.
Tutorials don't make you an advanced programmer, time and lots of
experience do that.

True, but reading the writings of those who have come before can help.
Simple example: many beginners use magic numbers; more experienced folks
tend to avoid them. It might take a hell of a long time before using them
really jumps up and bites you, but a little reading of some of the more
experienced folks would tell you not only not to use them, but *why* not
to use them.
The characterisation "hell of a long time" may be exaggerated. If
you're at all aware even about the rudimentary concepts of
readability, symbolic names for magic numbers should jump up and bite
you.

Mar 14 '07 #15

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[snips]

On Wed, 14 Mar 2007 00:05:00 -0700, santosh wrote:
The characterisation "hell of a long time" may be exaggerated. If
you're at all aware even about the rudimentary concepts of
readability, symbolic names for magic numbers should jump up and bite
you.

Depends. If one's in the habit of, say, using 512-byte buffers for reads,
it is eminently readable to them; in fact, the use of something such as
BUFFER_SIZE might strike them as _less_ readable.

Further, there's a certain mindset a lot of people get into that says "fix
this, but only this". So they discover that, oh, magic numbers for a port
turn out to be a bad idea, but don't realize the same applies to the
buffer size - they fix the one, but not the other.

It can take a long time to really get bit hard enough by this sort of
thing for it to really sink in that it's a bad idea not just in those
particular cases, but in general... and even longer to get out of the
habit of using them at all.

--
Do not contact me at kb********@ncoldns.com
Mar 18 '07 #16

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On Wed, 14 Mar 2007 00:21:11 -0500, Kelsey Bjarnason wrote
(in article <nr************@spanky.ubn.ca>):
On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 19:34:04 +0000, Randy Howard wrote:
>On Sat, 24 Feb 2007 23:58:18 -0600, vicky wrote
(in article <11**********************@m58g2000cwm.googlegroups .com>):
>>hi all,

please send me the link of tutorial of advance programming in c.

Tutorials don't make you an advanced programmer, time and lots of
experience do that.

True, but reading the writings of those who have come before can help.
For carefully selected examples of "those who have come before" that is
true. With far too many tutorials, quite the opposite is true.
--
Randy Howard (2reply remove FOOBAR)
"The power of accurate observation is called cynicism by those
who have not got it." - George Bernard Shaw

Mar 20 '07 #17

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