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What to do ?

P: n/a
Hi everyone.

I'm new to this group.
I'm also a newbie to the world of programming, and I needed some
advice. I started programming with
Python (thanks to ESR) and after finishing one tutorial I gained
enough knowledge to make small programs
and device my own algorithms. Then one of my friends who is an expert
programmer gave me the advice to shift to C. So I picked up this book
on C by Kernighan and Ritchie. I've completed the book and now I want
ideas on what to do next. I want to make my programming skills better.
And I need ideas on what to do next, I want something that is not too
advanced and not too easy. Something that will help me learn more
about this language and it's working.

So please can someone suggest anything ?

Feb 22 '07 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
ut************@gmail.com wrote:
Hi everyone.

I'm new to this group.
I'm also a newbie to the world of programming, and I needed some
advice. I started programming with
Python (thanks to ESR) and after finishing one tutorial I gained
enough knowledge to make small programs
and device my own algorithms. Then one of my friends who is an expert
programmer gave me the advice to shift to C. So I picked up this book
on C by Kernighan and Ritchie. I've completed the book and now I want
ideas on what to do next. I want to make my programming skills better.
And I need ideas on what to do next, I want something that is not too
advanced and not too easy. Something that will help me learn more
about this language and it's working.

So please can someone suggest anything ?
Have you actually practised? In programming practise makes perfect. As
far as C is concerned, you can try 'C Unleashed' by Heathfield, Kirby
et. al. and 'Expert C Programming' by Peter Vander Linden. For other
ideas post to comp.programming.

Feb 22 '07 #2

P: n/a

Have you actually practised? In programming practise makes perfect. As
far as C is concerned, you can try 'C Unleashed' by Heathfield, Kirby
et. al. and 'Expert C Programming' by Peter Vander Linden. For other
ideas post to comp.programming.

Yes, but not much. I need to get practice. That is why I asked for
ideas. Anyway, thanks for the names of the books.

Feb 22 '07 #3

P: n/a
ut************@gmail.com wrote:
Have you actually practised? In programming practise makes perfect. As
far as C is concerned, you can try 'C Unleashed' by Heathfield, Kirby
et. al. and 'Expert C Programming' by Peter Vander Linden. For other
ideas post to comp.programming.


Yes, but not much. I need to get practice. That is why I asked for
ideas. [ ... ]
Just select a task that you'd want to automate and which existing
programs don't do as well as you'd want. If that's difficult, then
simply select a project and do it, whether or not existing solutions
are available, since your implementation is meant for learning only.

Some ideas include:

1. A simplistic database program for storing, editing and printing
records.
2. A numerical calculator program, similar to Unix's dc.
3. A simple shell.
4. An interpreter for a very simple language, like say BASIC.
5. An editor like Unix's ed or sed.
6. A file search and/or pattern matching utility.
7. Task scheduler and alarm.
8. Simple FTP and/or HTTP client.

Possibilities are endless. You just need to sit and think.

Feb 22 '07 #4

P: n/a
On Feb 22, 6:57 pm, "santosh" <santosh....@gmail.comwrote:
utkarsh.tan...@gmail.com wrote:
Have you actually practised? In programming practise makes perfect. As
far as C is concerned, you can try 'C Unleashed' by Heathfield, Kirby
et. al. and 'Expert C Programming' by Peter Vander Linden. For other
ideas post to comp.programming.
Yes, but not much. I need to get practice. That is why I asked for
ideas. [ ... ]

Just select a task that you'd want to automate and which existing
programs don't do as well as you'd want. If that's difficult, then
simply select a project and do it, whether or not existing solutions
are available, since your implementation is meant for learning only.

Some ideas include:

1. A simplistic database program for storing, editing and printing
records.
2. A numerical calculator program, similar to Unix's dc.
3. A simple shell.
4. An interpreter for a very simple language, like say BASIC.
5. An editor like Unix's ed or sed.
6. A file search and/or pattern matching utility.
7. Task scheduler and alarm.
8. Simple FTP and/or HTTP client.

Possibilities are endless. You just need to sit and think.

Hey, thanks.
These are great ideas. Thanks a lot.
Feb 22 '07 #5

P: n/a
On Feb 22, 7:22 am, "utkarsh.tan...@gmail.com"
<utkarsh.tan...@gmail.comwrote:
On Feb 22, 6:57 pm, "santosh" <santosh....@gmail.comwrote:
utkarsh.tan...@gmail.com wrote:
Have you actually practised? In programming practise makes perfect. As
far as C is concerned, you can try 'C Unleashed' by Heathfield, Kirby
et. al. and 'Expert C Programming' by Peter Vander Linden. For other
ideas post to comp.programming.
Yes, but not much. I need to get practice. That is why I asked for
ideas. [ ... ]
Just select a task that you'd want to automate and which existing
programs don't do as well as you'd want. If that's difficult, then
simply select a project and do it, whether or not existing solutions
are available, since your implementation is meant for learning only.
Some ideas include:
1. A simplistic database program for storing, editing and printing
records.
2. A numerical calculator program, similar to Unix's dc.
3. A simple shell.
4. An interpreter for a very simple language, like say BASIC.
5. An editor like Unix's ed or sed.
6. A file search and/or pattern matching utility.
7. Task scheduler and alarm.
8. Simple FTP and/or HTTP client.
Possibilities are endless. You just need to sit and think.

Hey, thanks.
These are great ideas. Thanks a lot.
I like to learn a new language by doing a series of simple games.
In order, they are:
1. Hangman
2. blackjack aka 21
3. Tic-tac-toe

Feb 22 '07 #6

P: n/a

<ut************@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@s48g2000cws.googlegr oups.com...
Hi everyone.

I'm new to this group.
I'm also a newbie to the world of programming, and I needed some
advice. I started programming with
Python (thanks to ESR) and after finishing one tutorial I gained
enough knowledge to make small programs
and device my own algorithms. Then one of my friends who is an expert
programmer gave me the advice to shift to C. So I picked up this book
on C by Kernighan and Ritchie. I've completed the book and now I want
ideas on what to do next. I want to make my programming skills better.
And I need ideas on what to do next, I want something that is not too
advanced and not too easy. Something that will help me learn more
about this language and it's working.
"C" is a huge language with many aspects to learn. Perhaps some mathematical
problems.
Testing triplets to see if they could be the sides of a triangle?
{1,2,3} {5,2,6} {12,17,13}, {1,1,3}
Are any right angled triangles?
Solving simultaneous equations, say 4 in 4 variable. Write using loops.
make it sovle any number?
Can you then re-write the same program using recursion?
Which do you think is better?
Can you write code to shuffle and deal a pack of cards.
So please can someone suggest anything ?
Hope those are interesting an not too trivial. You might also want to get a
copy of "The Standard C Library" by Mr. Plauger. Lots of system stuff in
there, and some interesting exercises.
Feb 22 '07 #7

P: n/a
David Wade wrote:
"C" is a huge language with many aspects to learn.
?!

C is a *tiny* language!
--
Nick Keighley

"If you think C++ is not overly complicated, just what is a protected
abstract virtual base pure virtual private destructor, and when
was the last time you needed one?"
-- Tom Cargil, C++ Journal.

Feb 23 '07 #8

P: n/a
David Wade wrote:
"C" is a huge language with many aspects to learn.
C is about as far from "huge" as it's possible for a systems
programming language to get.

(BCPL is smaller but even though working with C's type system
is a little like washing with gravel in one's soap it's
still better than BCPL's "it's all bit-patterns" approach.
I say this as one who has used and loved that language.)

--
Chris "electric hedgehog" Dollin
"No-one here is exactly what he appears." G'kar, /Babylon 5/

Feb 23 '07 #9

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