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panic error

Hi,

I am compiling a C program on Hp-UX11.11 using the HP C compiler.

% cc test.c (say for example....)

I get the following message and the compilation is aborted.

% cc: panic 3011:

What does this mean ??

Thanks for help in advance.

Jan 10 '07 #1
15 1299
ni**********@gmail.com wrote:
Hi,

I am compiling a C program on Hp-UX11.11 using the HP C compiler.

% cc test.c (say for example....)

I get the following message and the compilation is aborted.

% cc: panic 3011:

What does this mean ??
You'd better ask on an HPUX list.

--
Ian Collins.
Jan 10 '07 #2
ni**********@gmail.com wrote:
Hi,

I am compiling a C program on Hp-UX11.11 using the HP C compiler.

% cc test.c (say for example....)

I get the following message and the compilation is aborted.

% cc: panic 3011:

What does this mean ??

Thanks for help in advance.
"panic 3011"

Scaring...

The most probable problem is tha the compiler is not correctly
installed. Sometimes this "fixes" itself by just reinstalling.
Jan 10 '07 #3
In article <45**********************@news.orange.fr>,
jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:
>Sometimes this "fixes" itself by just reinstalling.
Are you by any chance a Windows user?

-- Richard
--
"Consideration shall be given to the need for as many as 32 characters
in some alphabets" - X3.4, 1963.
Jan 10 '07 #4
Richard Tobin a écrit :
In article <45**********************@news.orange.fr>,
jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:

>>Sometimes this "fixes" itself by just reinstalling.


Are you by any chance a Windows user?

-- Richard
"panics" are very often bad installation or missing
parts of the software.

Yes, I am a windows user. No, I have never seen
software under windows "panic", that is a thing
that only happens to me under unix.

windows programs do not "panic", they just crash.

:-)
Jan 10 '07 #5
In article <45***********************@news.orange.fr>,
jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:
>>>Sometimes this "fixes" itself by just reinstalling.
>Are you by any chance a Windows user?
>"panics" are very often bad installation or missing
parts of the software.

Yes, I am a windows user. No, I have never seen
software under windows "panic", that is a thing
that only happens to me under unix.
"Panic" is just an error message. As I would have thought was
obvious, I was drawing attention to the attitude common amoung Windows
users that if something doesn't work, the solution is to reinstall
something - drivers, programs, the whole operating system. This
expectation that things will often stop working for no apparent
reason, and that all you can do is accept it and reinstall, is in my
experience largely confined to Windows users. Elsewhere, if something
doesn't work, we expect the cause to be found and rectified.

Windows users also expect others to follow the same defeatist dogma.
If a unix user phones their ISP to complain that their ADSL connection
isn't working, they will typically be told to try reinstalling the
drivers or operating system. When you ask which computer they'd like
you to do this on, they will say "all of them".

-- Richard

--
"Consideration shall be given to the need for as many as 32 characters
in some alphabets" - X3.4, 1963.
Jan 10 '07 #6
On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 14:59:23 -0600, jacob navia wrote
(in article <45***********************@news.orange.fr>):
Richard Tobin a écrit :
>In article <45**********************@news.orange.fr>,
jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:

>>Sometimes this "fixes" itself by just reinstalling.


Are you by any chance a Windows user?

-- Richard

"panics" are very often bad installation or missing
parts of the software.

Yes, I am a windows user. No, I have never seen
software under windows "panic", that is a thing
that only happens to me under unix.

windows programs do not "panic", they just crash.
hint: UNIX programs don't panic. The kernel does, in circumstances
where you get to something like:

/* uh oh, we're never supposed to wind up here */
panic();

otherwise known as unfinished code, or a condition so bad that no
reasonable error handling strategy is available other than a system
crash.

Whoever put that message in a C compiler was just being silly.

--
Randy Howard (2reply remove FOOBAR)
"The power of accurate observation is called cynicism by those
who have not got it." - George Bernard Shaw

Jan 10 '07 #7
Randy Howard a écrit :
On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 14:59:23 -0600, jacob navia wrote
(in article <45***********************@news.orange.fr>):

>>Richard Tobin a écrit :
>>>In article <45**********************@news.orange.fr>,
jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:

Sometimes this "fixes" itself by just reinstalling.
Are you by any chance a Windows user?

-- Richard

"panics" are very often bad installation or missing
parts of the software.

Yes, I am a windows user. No, I have never seen
software under windows "panic", that is a thing
that only happens to me under unix.

windows programs do not "panic", they just crash.


hint: UNIX programs don't panic. The kernel does, in circumstances
where you get to something like:

/* uh oh, we're never supposed to wind up here */
panic();

otherwise known as unfinished code, or a condition so bad that no
reasonable error handling strategy is available other than a system
crash.

Whoever put that message in a C compiler was just being silly.
You are too hard with the software developers!
If you assume that the shared library with the preprocessor is
in the installation directory and some moron student erased
it to make fun of his fellow students that is NOT something
you can foresee, for instance.

And it was better to write some diagnostic message than just crashing
like many windows programs do!

Normally C compilers (and in HP Unix machines) will never give such
an error. But if a component of the compiler is missing, for instance
that one that outputs error messages, the ONLy thing to do is just
write some diagnostics into the screen and exit.
Jan 10 '07 #8
ni**********@gmail.com a écrit :
Hi,

I am compiling a C program on Hp-UX11.11 using the HP C compiler.

% cc test.c (say for example....)

I get the following message and the compilation is aborted.

% cc: panic 3011:

What does this mean ??

Thanks for help in advance.
If you go to
http://docs.hp.com/en/92432-90012/ch08s03.html
you will find the description of the assembler
panic messages. The panic 3011 is NOT
in the documentation of the HP assembler
so it must be something "really" weird!

In any case panic messages are only mentioned in
the assembler documentation NOT in the compiler
documentation.

Do you have enough space in /tmp?
Do you have enough disk space in you machine?

Jan 10 '07 #9
jacob navia wrote:
Randy Howard a écrit :
On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 14:59:23 -0600, jacob navia wrote
(in article <45***********************@news.orange.fr>):

>Richard Tobin a écrit :

In article <45**********************@news.orange.fr>,
jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:

Sometimes this "fixes" itself by just reinstalling.
Are you by any chance a Windows user?

-- Richard

"panics" are very often bad installation or missing
parts of the software.

Yes, I am a windows user. No, I have never seen
software under windows "panic", that is a thing
that only happens to me under unix.

windows programs do not "panic", they just crash.

hint: UNIX programs don't panic. The kernel does, in circumstances
where you get to something like:

/* uh oh, we're never supposed to wind up here */
panic();

otherwise known as unfinished code, or a condition so bad that no
reasonable error handling strategy is available other than a system
crash.

Whoever put that message in a C compiler was just being silly.

You are too hard with the software developers!
If you assume that the shared library with the preprocessor is
in the installation directory and some moron student erased
it to make fun of his fellow students that is NOT something
you can foresee, for instance.
What's the "installation directory" ? Is it one which
anyone can write ?

Jan 10 '07 #10
On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 15:54:44 -0600, jacob navia wrote
(in article <45**********************@news.orange.fr>):
Randy Howard a écrit :
>hint: UNIX programs don't panic. The kernel does, in circumstances
where you get to something like:

/* uh oh, we're never supposed to wind up here */
panic();

otherwise known as unfinished code, or a condition so bad that no
reasonable error handling strategy is available other than a system
crash.

Whoever put that message in a C compiler was just being silly.

You are too hard with the software developers!
Au contraire, the population in general is not nearly hard enough on
them. Besides, calling somebody "silly" isn't very rough, even in this
insane period of political correctness.
If you assume that the shared library with the preprocessor is
in the installation directory and some moron student erased
it to make fun of his fellow students that is NOT something
you can foresee, for instance.
It's also a hell of lot more useful to write something like:

Error: There is something badly wrong with the installation directory:
/usr/contrib/mycc

But hey, "Panic:" is just oh so much more fun, and a sure sign that the
implementor had no idea what a real panic-level error entails.
And it was better to write some diagnostic message than just crashing
like many windows programs do!
Well sure. But that last problem is easily rectified by reinstalling a
proper operating system on the offensive hard drive.
Normally C compilers (and in HP Unix machines) will never give such
an error. But if a component of the compiler is missing, for instance
that one that outputs error messages, the ONLy thing to do is just
write some diagnostics into the screen and exit.
"Panic:" is /not/ a useful diagnostic in a C compiler.
--
Randy Howard (2reply remove FOOBAR)
"The power of accurate observation is called cynicism by those
who have not got it." - George Bernard Shaw

Jan 10 '07 #11
Randy Howard wrote:
On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 14:59:23 -0600, jacob navia wrote
(in article <45***********************@news.orange.fr>):
>Richard Tobin a écrit :
>>In article <45**********************@news.orange.fr>,
jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:
Sometimes this "fixes" itself by just reinstalling.

Are you by any chance a Windows user?

-- Richard
"panics" are very often bad installation or missing
parts of the software.

Yes, I am a windows user. No, I have never seen
software under windows "panic", that is a thing
that only happens to me under unix.

windows programs do not "panic", they just crash.

hint: UNIX programs don't panic. The kernel does, in circumstances
where you get to something like:

/* uh oh, we're never supposed to wind up here */
panic();

otherwise known as unfinished code, or a condition so bad that no
reasonable error handling strategy is available other than a system
crash.

Whoever put that message in a C compiler was just being silly.
That is not entirely true. I've seen compilers (especially the compiler
that comes with HPUX) throw this very same error (after spewing out
others) when it encounters more errors than it is designed to handle at
once. I suspect this is what the OP's issue is. The compiler is actually
producing informative messages before it reaches this point; check your
logs, terminal, or do not redirect output from the compiler. If this is
not the case then run your compiler via a debugger and find out where it
is crashing.
Jan 11 '07 #12
On 9 Jan 2007 22:28:09 -0800, ni**********@gmail.com wrote:
>Hi,

I am compiling a C program on Hp-UX11.11 using the HP C compiler.

% cc test.c (say for example....)

I get the following message and the compilation is aborted.

% cc: panic 3011:

What does this mean ??

Thanks for help in advance.
Could you kindly post the code in test.c, or whatever file you're
trying to compile?

Thanks
--
jay
Jan 11 '07 #13
jaysome <ja*****@hotmail.comwrites:
On 9 Jan 2007 22:28:09 -0800, ni**********@gmail.com wrote:
>>I am compiling a C program on Hp-UX11.11 using the HP C compiler.

% cc test.c (say for example....)

I get the following message and the compilation is aborted.

% cc: panic 3011:

What does this mean ??

Thanks for help in advance.

Could you kindly post the code in test.c, or whatever file you're
trying to compile?
That's unlikely to be helpful; "panic 3011" probably indicates a bug
in the compiler, not a diagnostic about the program.

The OP needs to ask in another newsgroup, most likely
comp.sys.hp.hpux.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <* <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
Jan 11 '07 #14
Spiros Bousbouras a écrit :
jacob navia wrote:
>>Randy Howard a écrit :
>>>On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 14:59:23 -0600, jacob navia wrote
(in article <45***********************@news.orange.fr>):

Richard Tobin a écrit :
>In article <45**********************@news.orange.fr>,
>jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:
>
>
>
>
>>Sometimes this "fixes" itself by just reinstalling.
>
>
>Are you by any chance a Windows user?
>
>-- Richard

"panics" are very often bad installation or missing
parts of the software.

Yes, I am a windows user. No, I have never seen
software under windows "panic", that is a thing
that only happens to me under unix.

windows programs do not "panic", they just crash.
hint: UNIX programs don't panic. The kernel does, in circumstances
where you get to something like:

/* uh oh, we're never supposed to wind up here */
panic();

otherwise known as unfinished code, or a condition so bad that no
reasonable error handling strategy is available other than a system
crash.

Whoever put that message in a C compiler was just being silly.

You are too hard with the software developers!
If you assume that the shared library with the preprocessor is
in the installation directory and some moron student erased
it to make fun of his fellow students that is NOT something
you can foresee, for instance.


What's the "installation directory" ? Is it one which
anyone can write ?
Supposedly not, but who knows who made the mistake?
Jan 11 '07 #15
Hi,

Thanks for all the info people....somebody asked for the code in
test.c, but sorry I am not authorised to do that.

Anyway...the problem seems with the HPUX C compiler and with some of
its patches....bcoz the program compiles on HPUX with the GCC
compiler.

Thanks once again.

Jan 11 '07 #16

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