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Funny problem with virtual method

P: n/a
Hi,

I have a weird problem in a virtual method. The original method code
raises an access violation when it is run. The solution to the problem
is to declare a dummy integer inside the virtual method. Then the
access violation no longer occurs!

The following class (condensed from the NetCDF C++ interface):

class NcVar : public NcTypedComponent
{
public:
// This method implements an abstract method in NcTypedComponent
virtual NcType type() const;
private:
int dim_to_index(NcDim* rdim);
int the_id;
};

Original implementation of type():

NcType NcVar::type() const
{
// nc_inq_vartype is a library function that works normally
// outside of this method
nc_type typ;
nc_inq_vartype(the_file->id(), the_id, &typ);
return (NcType)typ;
}

Running this code raises an access violation. Calling the exact same
code outside of the method works perfectly.

Modified implementation of type():

NcType NcVar::type() const
{
int x; // That's right, adding this makes it work

nc_type typ = 0;
nc_inq_vartype(the_file->id(), the_id, &typ);
return (NcType)typ;
}

Adding the "int x" makes the code run, without any access violations!
A few other of the virtual methods in other classes have a similar
problem.

What's going on here?

FYI, this code is from the NetCDF C++ interface. I am trying to use it
with Borland C++ Builder 6. I did not write the NetCDF C++ interface,
but I am trying to use it as-is, and the access violation problem has
been driving me nuts.

Any help would be appreciated.

Regards,
Markus.

Nov 24 '06 #1
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10 Replies


P: n/a

Markus Svilans napsal:
Hi,

I have a weird problem in a virtual method. The original method code
raises an access violation when it is run. The solution to the problem
is to declare a dummy integer inside the virtual method. Then the
access violation no longer occurs!

The following class (condensed from the NetCDF C++ interface):

class NcVar : public NcTypedComponent
{
public:
// This method implements an abstract method in NcTypedComponent
virtual NcType type() const;
private:
int dim_to_index(NcDim* rdim);
int the_id;
};

Original implementation of type():

NcType NcVar::type() const
{
// nc_inq_vartype is a library function that works normally
// outside of this method
nc_type typ;
nc_inq_vartype(the_file->id(), the_id, &typ);
return (NcType)typ;
}

Running this code raises an access violation. Calling the exact same
code outside of the method works perfectly.

Modified implementation of type():

NcType NcVar::type() const
{
int x; // That's right, adding this makes it work

nc_type typ = 0;
nc_inq_vartype(the_file->id(), the_id, &typ);
return (NcType)typ;
}

Adding the "int x" makes the code run, without any access violations!
A few other of the virtual methods in other classes have a similar
problem.

What's going on here?

FYI, this code is from the NetCDF C++ interface. I am trying to use it
with Borland C++ Builder 6. I did not write the NetCDF C++ interface,
but I am trying to use it as-is, and the access violation problem has
been driving me nuts.

Any help would be appreciated.

Regards,
Markus.
I think you are somewhere overwriting memory.

Nov 24 '06 #2

P: n/a
"Markus Svilans" <ms******@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@l39g2000cwd.googlegr oups.com...
Hi,

I have a weird problem in a virtual method. The original method code
raises an access violation when it is run. The solution to the problem
is to declare a dummy integer inside the virtual method. Then the
access violation no longer occurs!

The following class (condensed from the NetCDF C++ interface):

class NcVar : public NcTypedComponent
{
public:
// This method implements an abstract method in NcTypedComponent
virtual NcType type() const;
private:
int dim_to_index(NcDim* rdim);
int the_id;
};

Original implementation of type():

NcType NcVar::type() const
{
// nc_inq_vartype is a library function that works normally
// outside of this method
nc_type typ;
nc_inq_vartype(the_file->id(), the_id, &typ);
return (NcType)typ;
}

Running this code raises an access violation. Calling the exact same
code outside of the method works perfectly.

Modified implementation of type():

NcType NcVar::type() const
{
int x; // That's right, adding this makes it work

nc_type typ = 0;
nc_inq_vartype(the_file->id(), the_id, &typ);
return (NcType)typ;
}

Adding the "int x" makes the code run, without any access violations!
A few other of the virtual methods in other classes have a similar
problem.

What's going on here?

FYI, this code is from the NetCDF C++ interface. I am trying to use it
with Borland C++ Builder 6. I did not write the NetCDF C++ interface,
but I am trying to use it as-is, and the access violation problem has
been driving me nuts.

Any help would be appreciated.

Regards,
Markus.
This type of error, you get an access violatoin, but you do something
totally unrelated and it goes away, means you have a buffer overflow
somewhere. Adding that new variable shuffled the variables around a bit,
and it just means you're overwriting a variable that isn't immediately
causing an access violation, but your problem is still there.

Show a complete compilable program that causes the problem. I'll bet that
you won't even send it to this newsgroup, however, as the act of doing this
will show you where the problem is. If not, send the code.
Nov 24 '06 #3

P: n/a

Markus Svilans wrote in message
<11**********************@l39g2000cwd.googlegroups .com>...
>Hi,
I have a weird problem in a virtual method. The original method code
raises an access violation when it is run. The solution to the problem
is to declare a dummy integer inside the virtual method. Then the
access violation no longer occurs!
The following class (condensed from the NetCDF C++ interface):

class NcVar : public NcTypedComponent { public:
// This method implements an abstract method in NcTypedComponent
virtual NcType type() const;
private:
int dim_to_index( NcDim* rdim );
int the_id;
};

Original implementation of type():

NcType NcVar::type() const {
// nc_inq_vartype is a library function that works normally
// outside of this method
nc_type typ;
What is 'nc_type'?
nc_inq_vartype( the_file->id(), the_id, &typ );
What is 'the_file' pointing to?
// return (NcType)typ;

What is 'NcType'?

Pick one (try all).
return NcType( typ );
return static_cast<NcType>( typ );
return dynamic_cast<NcType>( typ );
return reinterpret_cast<NcType>( typ );

Remove the cast and see what your compiler is trying to do!
The 'C' cast may be covering up an error.

return typ;
>}

Running this code raises an access violation. Calling the exact same
code outside of the method works perfectly.
Show the call that works.

--
Bob R
POVrookie
Nov 24 '06 #4

P: n/a

Jim Langston wrote:
>
This type of error, you get an access violatoin, but you do something
totally unrelated and it goes away, means you have a buffer overflow
somewhere. Adding that new variable shuffled the variables around a bit,
and it just means you're overwriting a variable that isn't immediately
causing an access violation, but your problem is still there.

Show a complete compilable program that causes the problem. I'll bet that
you won't even send it to this newsgroup, however, as the act of doing this
will show you where the problem is. If not, send the code.
Hi Jim,

Thanks for the reply. I'll put together a compilable program that
should demonstrate the problem, assuming you have the NetCDF library
installed (http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/software/netcdf/).

The funny thing is, that access violation pops up when I try to compile
and run one of the demo programs that comes with the library.

Regards,
Markus.

Nov 24 '06 #5

P: n/a
Markus Svilans wrote:
Hi,

I have a weird problem in a virtual method. The original method code
raises an access violation when it is run. The solution to the problem
is to declare a dummy integer inside the virtual method. Then the
access violation no longer occurs!

The following class (condensed from the NetCDF C++ interface):

class NcVar : public NcTypedComponent
{
public:
// This method implements an abstract method in NcTypedComponent
virtual NcType type() const;
private:
int dim_to_index(NcDim* rdim);
int the_id;
};

Original implementation of type():

NcType NcVar::type() const
{
// nc_inq_vartype is a library function that works normally
// outside of this method
nc_type typ;
nc_inq_vartype(the_file->id(), the_id, &typ);
return (NcType)typ;
}

Running this code raises an access violation. Calling the exact same
code outside of the method works perfectly.

Modified implementation of type():

NcType NcVar::type() const
{
int x; // That's right, adding this makes it work

nc_type typ = 0;
nc_inq_vartype(the_file->id(), the_id, &typ);
return (NcType)typ;
}

Adding the "int x" makes the code run, without any access violations!
A few other of the virtual methods in other classes have a similar
problem.

What's going on here?

FYI, this code is from the NetCDF C++ interface. I am trying to use it
with Borland C++ Builder 6. I did not write the NetCDF C++ interface,
but I am trying to use it as-is, and the access violation problem has
been driving me nuts.

Any help would be appreciated.

Regards,
Markus.
when you "return (NcType)type;" you are copying the NcType object back to
the caller. NcType is an object, I don't know what nc_type is, but it could
be that Borland is just being way too liberal in its type casting. Try
getting rid of the "int x;" and replace the return with:

NcType ncType(nc_type); // or however one usually converts an nc_type to
NcType
return ncType;

If the problem goes away, it means that NcType is bigger than nc_type and
you tried to copy junk outside of your stack frame.

Nov 28 '06 #6

P: n/a

Jim Langston wrote:
This type of error, you get an access violatoin, but you do something
totally unrelated and it goes away, means you have a buffer overflow
somewhere. Adding that new variable shuffled the variables around a bit,
and it just means you're overwriting a variable that isn't immediately
causing an access violation, but your problem is still there.

Show a complete compilable program that causes the problem. I'll bet that
you won't even send it to this newsgroup, however, as the act of doing this
will show you where the problem is. If not, send the code.
Hi Jim,

The program I am trying to run is here:
http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/software...temp_4D_wr.cpp

I am using Borland C++ Builder 6 Personal, with the Windows DLL version
of the netCDF 3.6.1 library. In order to compile the program, you will
have to install the netCDF library somehow.

I am assuming that my problem lies somewhere with the C++ interface to
the library, and not the library itself, because I can use the C
function calls without any access violations.

If you would like me to send you a copy of the C++ interface of the
library, please let me know.

Regards,
Markus.

Nov 28 '06 #7

P: n/a

BobR wrote:
NcType NcVar::type() const {
// nc_inq_vartype is a library function that works normally
// outside of this method
nc_type typ;

What is 'nc_type'?
nc_type is an enumerated type.
nc_inq_vartype( the_file->id(), the_id, &typ );

What is 'the_file' pointing to?
the_file is an NcFile object, and the id() method just returns an
integer representing the unique identifier of the NcFile object.

the_id is another integer (a member of the NcVar class) that is passed
to nc_inq_vartype().
// return (NcType)typ;

What is 'NcType'?
NcType is an enumerated type, that mirrors the nc_type enumerator
member by member. (This is why directly casting from one to another
works.)
Pick one (try all).
return NcType( typ );
return static_cast<NcType>( typ );
return dynamic_cast<NcType>( typ );
return reinterpret_cast<NcType>( typ );
I tried all of these, and those that compiled did not aleviate the
problem...

Regards,
Markus.

Nov 28 '06 #8

P: n/a

Tim D wrote:
when you "return (NcType)type;" you are copying the NcType object back to
the caller. NcType is an object, I don't know what nc_type is, but it could
be that Borland is just being way too liberal in its type casting. Try
getting rid of the "int x;" and replace the return with:

NcType ncType(nc_type); // or however one usually converts an nc_type to
NcType
return ncType;

If the problem goes away, it means that NcType is bigger than nc_type and
you tried to copy junk outside of your stack frame.

NcType and nc_type are both enumerators, whose members have a 1:1
correspondence to each other. In effect NcType is an alias for nc_type.
The two types exist because the nc_type enumerator is used in the pure
C library function calls, and NcType is used for the C++ interface.

Regards,
Markus.

Nov 28 '06 #9

P: n/a

Markus Svilans wrote in message ...
>
BobR wrote:
>Pick one (try all).
return NcType( typ );
return static_cast<NcType>( typ );
return dynamic_cast<NcType>( typ );
return reinterpret_cast<NcType>( typ );

I tried all of these, and those that compiled did not aleviate the
problem...
Well, duh. It wasn't meant to 'aleviate the problem', but, to show what type
the function was returning and what was expected. ( I should have explicitely
asked you to post the errors on each.). But, if you have to cast, use one of
those (probably 'static_cast').

So, what is the error on:
return typ;

( remove the line number and pathname, just post the error part.)

--
Bob R
POVrookie
Nov 28 '06 #10

P: n/a

BobR wrote:
Markus Svilans wrote in message ...

BobR wrote:
Pick one (try all).
return NcType( typ );
return static_cast<NcType>( typ );
return dynamic_cast<NcType>( typ );
return reinterpret_cast<NcType>( typ );
I tried all of these, and those that compiled did not aleviate the
problem...

Well, duh. It wasn't meant to 'aleviate the problem', but, to show what type
the function was returning and what was expected. ( I should have explicitely
asked you to post the errors on each.). But, if you have to cast, use one of
those (probably 'static_cast').

So, what is the error on:
return typ;

( remove the line number and pathname, just post the error part.)

The warning message for "return typ" was:

W8006 Initializing NcType with nc_type

As I said, NcType and nc_type are both enumerators.

Thanks,
Markus.

Nov 29 '06 #11

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