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function reference

P: n/a
Hello, I'm a newbie here so I apologize for any lameness in advance.

I was reading

http://www.library.cornell.edu/nr/bookcpdf/c10-2.pdf

while trying to implement Brent's method in another language
(Mathematica).

However, I have no idea what the SHFT function does.

Will someone point me to a good online function reference for C,
preferably one that documents this SHFT function?

Thank you for your time,

Oct 3 '06 #1
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P: n/a
Chris Chiasson schrieb:
Hello, I'm a newbie here so I apologize for any lameness in advance.

I was reading

http://www.library.cornell.edu/nr/bookcpdf/c10-2.pdf

while trying to implement Brent's method in another language
(Mathematica).

However, I have no idea what the SHFT function does.

Will someone point me to a good online function reference for C,
preferably one that documents this SHFT function?
There is not SHFT function in C. It is a macro defined on page 404 of the pdf.

--
Thomas
http://www.netmeister.org/news/learn2quote.html
Oct 3 '06 #2

P: n/a

Chris Chiasson wrote:
Hello, I'm a newbie here so I apologize for any lameness in advance.

I was reading

http://www.library.cornell.edu/nr/bookcpdf/c10-2.pdf

while trying to implement Brent's method in another language
(Mathematica).

However, I have no idea what the SHFT function does.

Will someone point me to a good online function reference for C,
preferably one that documents this SHFT function?

Thank you for your time,
Good reference: The C Programming Language, by Kernighan and Ritchie.
Actually, make that great reference.

SHFT is not standard. It's defined as a macro in the program you
reference by the line:
#define SHFT(a,b,c,d) (a)=(b);(b)=(c);(c)=(d);

So in other words, SHFT(a, b, c, d) does:
a = b;
b = c;
c = d;

The extra parentheses (in the #define) are needed for macros. You can
read all about it elsewhere.

Hope this helps.

Michael

Oct 3 '06 #3

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