By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
449,407 Members | 1,033 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 449,407 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

C GUI programming

P: n/a
I have been googling, but can seem to find out about C GUI libraries.

My main platform is Windows, but it would be nice to find a cross platform
library.

I've been programming with php, which has a C/C++ syntax structure, but want
to move on to compliled languages.

I was all ready to go with C++ and wxWindows, but I'm applying for an entry
level programming possition. They use their own propriatary language, with
is a structured/proceedural language. I thought that if I study C, it would
make me a better programmer for my employer.

I also have the "Algorithms with C", and "Code Reading" books, that focus
mainly on the C language. I'm sure that it wouldn't be hard for me to change
my thinking and implement both books into a C++ sense.

The main thing is, I love programming in general, but I'd like to be able to
code GUI's also.

Can anyone give me a direction to head in, where I can learn more about GUI
programming in C. Idealy, I'd love to start my compiled language studies
with C, then move on to C++ once I have a solid foundation in
structured/proceedural programming.
Sep 8 '06 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
30 Replies


P: n/a
In article <c4******************************@adelphia.com>,
Jakle <ja***@dsa-gamers.comwrote:
>I have been googling, but can seem to find out about C GUI libraries.
>My main platform is Windows, but it would be nice to find a cross platform
library.
The C language itself does not define anything to do with Graphics.
Try another newsgroup; perhaps some of the comp.graphics.* ones
such as comp.graphics.misc

--
Programming is what happens while you're busy making other plans.
Sep 8 '06 #2

P: n/a
Jakle wrote:
I have been googling, but can seem to find out about C GUI libraries.

My main platform is Windows, but it would be nice to find a cross platform
library.

I've been programming with php, which has a C/C++ syntax structure, but want
to move on to compliled languages.

I was all ready to go with C++ and wxWindows, but I'm applying for an entry
level programming possition. They use their own propriatary language, with
is a structured/proceedural language. I thought that if I study C, it would
make me a better programmer for my employer.

I also have the "Algorithms with C", and "Code Reading" books, that focus
mainly on the C language. I'm sure that it wouldn't be hard for me to change
my thinking and implement both books into a C++ sense.

The main thing is, I love programming in general, but I'd like to be able to
code GUI's also.

Can anyone give me a direction to head in, where I can learn more about GUI
programming in C. Idealy, I'd love to start my compiled language studies
with C, then move on to C++ once I have a solid foundation in
structured/proceedural programming.

Look, download the tutorial in
http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32

together with the associated compiler system.

There you will find a step by step introduction to
the C language and windows C programming.

No, it is not something that will allow you to
program under Unix or under Mac, it is only windows.

Read specially Chapter 2: "windows programming". Of course
after being current with chapter 1, "C programming".

All of this is free of charge.

jacob
Sep 8 '06 #3

P: n/a
Walter Roberson wrote:
In article <c4******************************@adelphia.com>,
Jakle <ja***@dsa-gamers.comwrote:
>I have been googling, but can seem to find out about C GUI libraries.
>My main platform is Windows, but it would be nice to find a cross platform
library.

The C language itself does not define anything to do with Graphics.
Try another newsgroup; perhaps some of the comp.graphics.* ones
such as comp.graphics.misc
Depending on what you're running, you might just want to jump on the MS
wagon with MFC, see microsoft.public.vc.mfc . If you're broke coming
out of college, they have a visual studio for hobbyists and such, so you
don't have to cough up a lot of money from the getgo, although this
suite deals with Winforms and does not support MFC. I'm not sure that
the C programming language admits that monitors exist. EC
*******************
Programming is what happens while you're busy making other plans.
--adapted from John Lennon
Sep 8 '06 #4

P: n/a
My main platform is Windows, but it would be nice to find a cross platform
library.
It looks like you want to do GUI programming in Windows.
I've been programming with php, which has a C/C++ syntax structure, but want
to move on to compliled languages.
yep, php and almost all the languages have similar semantics and only
the syntax and layout of the program will be different along with other
features such as oop.
I was all ready to go with C++ and wxWindows, but I'm applying for an entry
level programming possition. They use their own propriatary language, with
is a structured/proceedural language. I thought that if I study C, it would
make me a better programmer for my employer.
GUI programming by definition goes for event driven programming. So you
need to come out of the proceedural programming concept.

Once you are good in C programming, it would be easy to migrate to
event driven programming
I also have the "Algorithms with C", and "Code Reading" books, that focus
mainly on the C language. I'm sure that it wouldn't be hard for me to change
my thinking and implement both books into a C++ sense.
Good books...
The main thing is, I love programming in general, but I'd like to be able to
code GUI's also.
Can anyone give me a direction to head in, where I can learn more about GUI
programming in C. Idealy, I'd love to start my compiled language studies
with C, then move on to C++ once I have a solid foundation in
structured/proceedural programming.
you can use win32 for GUI programming. It seems complicated at first,
but it is rather simple once you get the concept. You can create GUI
programs entirely in C language no C++ knowledge is required. But first
you need to get good grip in C language programming.

You can post your win32 programming questions in win32 forums.

Good Luck...

Sep 8 '06 #5

P: n/a
Thank you very much for this link. This is just what I was looking for :-)
"jacob navia" <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote in message
news:45***********************@news.orange.fr...
Jakle wrote:
>I have been googling, but can seem to find out about C GUI libraries.

My main platform is Windows, but it would be nice to find a cross
platform library.

I've been programming with php, which has a C/C++ syntax structure, but
want to move on to compliled languages.

I was all ready to go with C++ and wxWindows, but I'm applying for an
entry level programming possition. They use their own propriatary
language, with is a structured/proceedural language. I thought that if I
study C, it would make me a better programmer for my employer.

I also have the "Algorithms with C", and "Code Reading" books, that focus
mainly on the C language. I'm sure that it wouldn't be hard for me to
change my thinking and implement both books into a C++ sense.

The main thing is, I love programming in general, but I'd like to be able
to code GUI's also.

Can anyone give me a direction to head in, where I can learn more about
GUI programming in C. Idealy, I'd love to start my compiled language
studies with C, then move on to C++ once I have a solid foundation in
structured/proceedural programming.

Look, download the tutorial in
http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32

together with the associated compiler system.

There you will find a step by step introduction to
the C language and windows C programming.

No, it is not something that will allow you to
program under Unix or under Mac, it is only windows.

Read specially Chapter 2: "windows programming". Of course
after being current with chapter 1, "C programming".

All of this is free of charge.

jacob

Sep 8 '06 #6

P: n/a
Elijah Cardon <in*****@invalid.netwrites:
Walter Roberson wrote:
>In article <c4******************************@adelphia.com>,
Jakle <ja***@dsa-gamers.comwrote:
>>I have been googling, but can seem to find out about C GUI libraries.
>>My main platform is Windows, but it would be nice to find a cross
platform library.
The C language itself does not define anything to do with Graphics.
Try another newsgroup; perhaps some of the comp.graphics.* ones
such as comp.graphics.misc
Depending on what you're running, you might just want to jump on the
MS wagon with MFC, see microsoft.public.vc.mfc .
[snip]

MFC is cross-platform?

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <* <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
Sep 8 '06 #7

P: n/a
"kondal" <ko******@gmail.comwrites:
>My main platform is Windows, but it would be nice to find a cross platform
library.
The above was written by "Jakle" <ja***@dsa-gamers.com>. Please don't
snip attribution lines.
It looks like you want to do GUI programming in Windows.
No, it looks like he wants a cross platform library.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <* <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
Sep 8 '06 #8

P: n/a
Keith Thompson said:
Elijah Cardon <in*****@invalid.netwrites:
>Walter Roberson wrote:
>>In article <c4******************************@adelphia.com>,
Jakle <ja***@dsa-gamers.comwrote:
I have been googling, but can seem to find out about C GUI libraries.

My main platform is Windows, but it would be nice to find a cross
platform library.
The C language itself does not define anything to do with Graphics.
Try another newsgroup; perhaps some of the comp.graphics.* ones
such as comp.graphics.misc
Depending on what you're running, you might just want to jump on the
MS wagon with MFC,
A three-wheeled wagon that has been all but abandoned by its owner.
see microsoft.public.vc.mfc .
[snip]

MFC is cross-platform?
MFC is C?

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
Sep 8 '06 #9

P: n/a
On Fri, 08 Sep 2006 17:01:46 -0400, in comp.lang.c , Elijah Cardon
<in*****@invalid.netwrote:
>Walter Roberson wrote:
>In article <c4******************************@adelphia.com>,
Jakle <ja***@dsa-gamers.comwrote:
>>I have been googling, but can seem to find out about C GUI libraries.
>>My main platform is Windows, but it would be nice to find a cross platform
library.

The C language itself does not define anything to do with Graphics.
Try another newsgroup; perhaps some of the comp.graphics.* ones
such as comp.graphics.misc
Depending on what you're running, you might just want to jump on the MS
wagon with MFC, see microsoft.public.vc.mfc .
Not especially crossplatform though....
>If you're broke coming
out of college, they have a visual studio for hobbyists and such,
There are also plenty of free or shareware GUI and graphics libraries.
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Sep 8 '06 #10

P: n/a
yep, it missed in the somehow. Thank you for pointing.

-kondal
Keith Thompson wrote:
"kondal" <ko******@gmail.comwrites:
My main platform is Windows, but it would be nice to find a cross platform
library.

The above was written by "Jakle" <ja***@dsa-gamers.com>. Please don't
snip attribution lines.
It looks like you want to do GUI programming in Windows.

No, it looks like he wants a cross platform library.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <* <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
Sep 8 '06 #11

P: n/a
Elijah Cardon <in*****@invalid.netwrote:
Depending on what you're running, you might just want to jump on the MS
wagon with MFC, see microsoft.public.vc.mfc.
As long as we're dispensing OT advice, MFC is a poor choice for
someone looking for a career skill. It's true that there is still a
lot of MFC code out there that needs maintenance, but only because the
resources to rewrite such code to use modern, fully-supported
languages and libraries do not exist. .NET languages, whatever their
other flaws, are supported on Windows platforms and are gaining
popularity; OP may do much better to examine the .NET option if it is
financialy viable. Java may (may) also be something for OP to look
at.
I'm not sure that
the C programming language admits that monitors exist. EC
The C programming language admits the existence of very few things,
and monitors are not one of them.

--
C. Benson Manica | I *should* know what I'm talking about - if I
cbmanica(at)gmail.com | don't, I need to know. Flames welcome.
Sep 9 '06 #12

P: n/a
jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:
Look, download the tutorial in
http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32
the link to the "C-tutorial" is broken.
--
une bévue
Sep 9 '06 #13

P: n/a

"Jakle" <ja***@dsa-gamers.comwrote in message
news:c4******************************@adelphia.com ...
>I have been googling, but can seem to find out about C GUI libraries.

My main platform is Windows, but it would be nice to find a cross platform
library.

I've been programming with php, which has a C/C++ syntax structure, but
want to move on to compliled languages.

I was all ready to go with C++ and wxWindows, but I'm applying for an
entry level programming possition. They use their own propriatary
language, with is a structured/proceedural language. I thought that if I
study C, it would make me a better programmer for my employer.

I also have the "Algorithms with C", and "Code Reading" books, that focus
mainly on the C language. I'm sure that it wouldn't be hard for me to
change my thinking and implement both books into a C++ sense.

The main thing is, I love programming in general, but I'd like to be able
to code GUI's also.

Can anyone give me a direction to head in, where I can learn more about
GUI programming in C. Idealy, I'd love to start my compiled language
studies with C, then move on to C++ once I have a solid foundation in
structured/proceedural programming.
Do you have a Microsoft compiler?

Write a minimal Windows program, and then you are away. Start with one
window and draw pixels to it individually. Then as you grow in confidence
add text, buttons, menus, edit windows. With that you've got a basic but
functional GUI which will serve for all but the most elaborate of
applications.

This can all be done in C. You call calling non-ANSI libraries, and there is
quirk about the entry point, but it still very much a C program.

--
www.personal.leeds.ac.uk/~bgy1mm
freeware games to download.
Sep 9 '06 #14

P: n/a
Keith Thompson wrote:
Elijah Cardon <in*****@invalid.netwrites:
>Walter Roberson wrote:
>>In article <c4******************************@adelphia.com>,
Jakle <ja***@dsa-gamers.comwrote:
I have been googling, but can seem to find out about C GUI libraries.
My main platform is Windows, but it would be nice to find a cross
platform library.
The C language itself does not define anything to do with Graphics.
Try another newsgroup; perhaps some of the comp.graphics.* ones
such as comp.graphics.misc
Depending on what you're running, you might just want to jump on the
MS wagon with MFC, see microsoft.public.vc.mfc .
[snip]

MFC is cross-platform?
Of course not. MFC has been a huge workhorse for a couple decades on
the most influential OS, an OS that puts bread on a lot of tables. And
one could (present, subjunctive) figure out easy ways for a C module to
talk to it. But that won't pop up here, on Gilligan's Island, lacking
Ginger, MaryAnn, and--it's an island--Mrs. Howell. Rather than talk
about graphics, about which I care nothing, I would rather talk about
largish numbers, combinatorial-sized. Elijah
Sep 9 '06 #15

P: n/a
Une bévue said:
jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:
>Look, download the tutorial in
http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32

the link to the "C-tutorial" is broken.
The correct URL is guessable. However, I'm not going to advertise it, since
this tutorial needs to be buried as deeply as possible.

Even the author doesn't have a lot of faith in it, since he says that this
tutorial to the C language "supposes that you have the lcc-win32 compiler
system installed", so it's presumably not an intro to standard C at all,
but an intro to "Navia C", as we might call it.

The tutorial also claims "this is not a full-fledged introduction" and that
there are "other, better books".

It also claims that "Dennis Ritchie wrote the preprocessor of the lcc-win32
system". This seems disingenuous. It would probably be clearer to say that
Dennis Ritchie wrote an open source preprocessor, which lcc-win32 uses.

The first example program incorporates line numbers, with no indication as
far as I can see that they are not an integral part of the program. Despite
its claim to be "the famous example given already by the authors of the
language", it is not.

On page 15 (of 398) Mr Navia claims that printf "formats its arguments in a
character string that is displayed in the screen". This is a more serious
mistake with the tutorial, since it is erroneous in at least two respects.
In the same paragraph, he claims that character strings "are enclosed in
double quotes", which is simply not true except for string literals.

On page 17, we learn Jacob doesn't appear to understand the difference
between parameters and arguments. In fact, his explanation of arguments is
completely broken. He also thinks that "the function ... will use only a
copy, not the original value", which is wrong, of course. The very same
value that is passed to the function as an argument is received as a
parameter by the function.

He claims on page 18 that "the fn2 function will always return 7", whereas
the truth is that the fn2 function will not compile, because it's missing a
rather important syntactical element.

And so on, and so on. Life's too short to plough through all 398 pages, if
this is the kind of "quality" we can expect in the other 380 or so. I
suggest you look elsewhere for your C tutorial. A list of two good on-line
tutorials can be found at:

http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/portable/...p#WebTutorials
--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
Sep 9 '06 #16

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield wrote:

[snipped]

Dictionary.com

ped‧ant  /ˈpɛdnt/
–noun
1. a person who makes an excessive or inappropriate display of learning.
2. a person who overemphasizes rules or minor details.
3. a person who adheres rigidly to book knowledge without regard to
common sense.
Sep 9 '06 #17

P: n/a
[Non-ASCII codes removed]

jacob navia said:
Richard Heathfield wrote:

[snipped]

Dictionary.com

pedant? /pdnt/
Please don't post non-ASCII characters to Usenet.

Anyway, thanks for calling me a pedant. I view it as a compliment, although
it is typically intended as an insult, typically directed at those who know
what they're talking about by those who don't.
?noun
1. a person who makes an excessive or inappropriate display of learning.
Your example code didn't compile, and your explanation about function
parameters was broken. What would you call a person who makes an excessive
or inappropriate display of ignorance?

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
Sep 9 '06 #18

P: n/a
In article <45***********************@news.orange.fr>,
jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:
>Richard Heathfield wrote:

[snipped]

Dictionary.com

ped‧ant  /ˈpɛdnt/
–noun
1. a person who makes an excessive or inappropriate display of learning.
2. a person who overemphasizes rules or minor details.
3. a person who adheres rigidly to book knowledge without regard to
common sense.
Useful clc-related links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clique
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspergers
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_programming_language

And keep in mind that Heathfield:

a) Considers "pedant" to be a compliment
and b) Considers "Aspergers" to be an insult

Neither is remotely correct. What a marooon!

Sep 9 '06 #19

P: n/a
Kenny McCormack said:

<snip>
>
And keep in mind that Heathfield:

a) Considers "pedant" to be a compliment
True.
and b) Considers "Aspergers" to be an insult
False. It is, however, misused by some people to describe those who are
brighter than them.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
Sep 9 '06 #20

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield wrote:
[valid criticism]
jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrites:
[calls Richard a pedant]
The proper response to valid criticisms of one's writing is to
fix them, not to call the critic names (whether they are true or
false).
--
"I should killfile you where you stand, worthless human." --Kaz
Sep 9 '06 #21

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield <in*****@invalid.invalidwrites:
Kenny McCormack said:
<snip>
Please don't feed the troll.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <* <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
Sep 9 '06 #22

P: n/a
GTK+ is a cross platform GUI library written in C. You can also use
GTK+ from C, C++, PHP, Python, Java, Ada and other languages. You know
GNOME and GIMP are based on GTK+2.
Official Site: http://www.gtk.org/
Windows Port: http://www.gimp.org/~tml/gimp/win32/
GTK+ Language Bindings: http://www.gtk.org/bindings.html

Glade, GUI designer for GTK+, are also avairable for Windows.
Official Site: http://glade.gnome.org/

Sep 9 '06 #23

P: n/a
In article <ln************@nuthaus.mib.org>,
Keith Thompson <ks***@mib.orgwrote:
>Richard Heathfield <in*****@invalid.invalidwrites:
>Kenny McCormack said:
<snip>

Please don't feed the troll.
It really scares you, doesn't it?
That people might actually pay attention to what I write and you might
lose control of the ng.

Believe me, I have no desire to gag any of you "regulars". You show
your true colors every time you (metaphorically) open your mouths.

Sep 9 '06 #24

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield a écrit :
[Non-ASCII codes removed]

jacob navia said:

>>Richard Heathfield wrote:

[snipped]

Dictionary.com

pedant? /pdnt/


Please don't post non-ASCII characters to Usenet.

Anyway, thanks for calling me a pedant. I view it as a compliment, although
it is typically intended as an insult, typically directed at those who know
what they're talking about by those who don't.

>>?noun
1. a person who makes an excessive or inappropriate display of learning.


Your example code didn't compile, and your explanation about function
parameters was broken. What would you call a person who makes an excessive
or inappropriate display of ignorance?
Yes, I missed a semicolon.

GREAT HEATHFIELD, GREAT. A missing semicolon is all is needed
to qualify the 380 pages as a pile of shit.

And this is a TUTORIAL, not a treatise for everything
about C. So, you read the first 15 pages and you want
me to introduce all pedantic distinctions to really
CONFUSE everybody.

You say:
The tutorial also claims "this is not a full-fledged introduction"
and that there are "other, better books"

but this does not mean that
"Even the author doesn't have a lot of faith in it"
as you misunderstand,

it means just that I am not like other people that are
convinced that their work IS THE ONLY AND BEST POSSIBLE OF ALL.

No.

I know that are other people better than me that wrote better books than
what I did.
Your argument that I do not understand the difference between
parameters and arguments is NONSENSE Heathfield.

I cite the "wikipedia"

< quote >
Many programmers use parameter and argument interchangeably, depending
on context to distinguish the meaning. In practice, distinguishing
between the two terms is usually unnecessary in order to use them
correctly or communicate their use to other programmers.
< end quote >
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paramet...mputer_science)

And you want me that I go into those PEDANTIC DETAILS at page 15
of the tutorial (what actually is page 5, excluding title, contents
etc).
Sep 9 '06 #25

P: n/a
In article <87************@benpfaff.org>,
Ben Pfaff <bl*@cs.stanford.eduwrote:
>Richard Heathfield wrote:
>[valid criticism]

jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrites:
>[calls Richard a pedant]

The proper response to valid criticisms of one's writing is to
fix them, not to call the critic names (whether they are true or
false).
But, but, but. Heathfield took it as a *compliment*, so it can hardly
be referred to as "calling [the critic] names".

Besides which, as you well know, Jacob (and I and any other sane person)
takes excception to your use of the word "valid". Something about a
"parallel universe"...

Sep 9 '06 #26

P: n/a
jacob navia said:
Richard Heathfield a écrit :
>[Non-ASCII codes removed]

jacob navia said:
>>>?noun
1. a person who makes an excessive or inappropriate display of
learning.


Your example code didn't compile, and your explanation about function
parameters was broken. What would you call a person who makes an
excessive or inappropriate display of ignorance?

Yes, I missed a semicolon.
Yup. In tutorial code, that's not good. I suggest compiling the code in
future.
GREAT HEATHFIELD, GREAT. A missing semicolon is all is needed
to qualify the 380 pages as a pile of shit.
You appear to have missed my other crits, and my explicit statement that I
had only read the first few pages.

<snip>
I cite the "wikipedia"
The Wikipedia is not normative.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
Sep 9 '06 #27

P: n/a
"Kenny McCormack" <ga*****@xmission.xmission.comwrote in message
In article <45***********************@news.orange.fr>,
jacob navia <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:
>>Richard Heathfield wrote:

[snipped]

Dictionary.com

pedâ?§antâ?, /Ë^pÉ>dnt/
â?"noun
1. a person who makes an excessive or inappropriate display of learning.
2. a person who overemphasizes rules or minor details.
3. a person who adheres rigidly to book knowledge without regard to
common sense.

Useful clc-related links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clique
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspergers
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_programming_language

And keep in mind that Heathfield:

a) Considers "pedant" to be a compliment
and b) Considers "Aspergers" to be an insult

Neither is remotely correct. What a marooon!
A compiler gives the superficial impression of being like a human. We even
use the term "language" to describe the way we communicate with it.
Unfortunately we don't even know how to set about building a compiler with
anything remotely resembling real language. One that could understand this
post, for instance. So the programmer does have to adopt a computer-like
personality if he wishes his programs to be correct.

This includes things such as
"He claims on page 18 that "the fn2 function will always return 7", whereas
the truth is that the fn2 function will not compile, because it's missing a
rather important syntactical element."

Sadly, if you miss off a semicolon, or replace it with a colon, the
compiler won't be clever enough to make the correction.

However there can be a problem with a pedagogy. Often it is better to skate
over minor details, such as the fact that printf() doesn't always write to
the screen, in the initial stages. People who are highly knowledgeable in
the subject, but not teachers, often don't appreciate this.
--
www.personal.leeds.ac.uk/~bgy1mm
freeware games to download.
Sep 10 '06 #28

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield a écrit :
jacob navia said:

>>Richard Heathfield a écrit :
>>>[Non-ASCII codes removed]

jacob navia said:
?noun
1. a person who makes an excessive or inappropriate display of
learning.
Your example code didn't compile, and your explanation about function
parameters was broken. What would you call a person who makes an
excessive or inappropriate display of ignorance?

Yes, I missed a semicolon.


Yup. In tutorial code, that's not good. I suggest compiling the code in
future.

Yeah, thanks. You missed the bibliography too, the first entry.
You are one of the people that write better books heathfield.

It is a pity that you are so pedantic.

Sep 10 '06 #29

P: n/a
jacob navia said:

<snip>
>
You are one of the people that write better books heathfield.

It is a pity that you are so pedantic.
If you take away the cause, you lose the effect.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
Sep 10 '06 #30

P: n/a
In article <LK******************************@bt.com>,
Malcolm <re*******@btinternet.comwrote:
>Do you have a Microsoft compiler?

Write a minimal Windows program,
<snip>
>This can all be done in C. You call calling non-ANSI libraries, and there is
quirk about the entry point, but it still very much a C program.
It's a perfectly valid program for a freestanding C implementation.
The entire C standard library is even available, and most of it[1] works
as advertised, which is rather more than is required of a freestanding
implementation.

(I'll leave it to others to refer to the precise definition of what
makes an implementation freestanding and draw the obvious conclusion
about the platform it's running on.)
dave

[1] The obvious exceptions being the parts that involve stdin, stdout,
and stderr

--
Dave Vandervies dj******@csclub.uwaterloo.ca
I just thought it would be more topical to tune from C. That would have
been fine if I'd got the pitch of C right.
--Richard Heathfield in comp.lang.c
Sep 11 '06 #31

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.