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read image from url

P: n/a
Hi, can anyone point me a library that can read image to memory from a
URL? It is very easy in Java, but it is hard to find an complete
solution in c/c++.

Thanks,

Jul 3 '06 #1
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92 Replies


P: n/a
qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Hi, can anyone point me a library that can read image to memory from a
URL? It is very easy in Java, but it is hard to find an complete
solution in c/c++.
Maybe because the mythical language of C/C++ doesn't exit?

You will have to find yourself an HTTP library in your preferred language.

--
Ian Collins.
Jul 3 '06 #2

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Ian Collins posted:
qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
>Hi, can anyone point me a library that can read image to memory from
a URL? It is very easy in Java, but it is hard to find an complete
solution in c/c++.
Maybe because the mythical language of C/C++ doesn't exit?

The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".

If I were to write a program which didn't use the extended features which
C++ provides over C, then I'd call it a C program.

Makes me think of how race car manufacturers try to get a "road
worthiness stamp" for their race vehicles; these vehicles are primarily
race vehicles, not road vehicles, but if they can get a road-worthiness
stamp for it aswell, then that's great!

If you start off writing a program with no intention of prohibiting
yourself from using C++ features, and still end up with a finished
product which doesn't use C++ features, then it's quite like setting out
to design a race car, and ending up with a car that's also road-worthy.

I compare the ability to "compile as C" with a "road worthiness stamp" --
it's the icing on the cake!

I *never* hesitate to use C++ features, (and I actually use them quite
often), but if I did some day produce a program which didn't use any C++
features at all, I'd consider going back through it and changing
everything to C.

If you're after versatility, it's better to have C code than C++ code.
--

Frederick Gotham
Jul 4 '06 #3

P: n/a

Frederick Gotham wrote:
Ian Collins posted:
qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Hi, can anyone point me a library that can read image to memory from
a URL? It is very easy in Java, but it is hard to find an complete
solution in c/c++.
Maybe because the mythical language of C/C++ doesn't exit?


The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".

If I were to write a program which didn't use the extended features which
C++ provides over C, then I'd call it a C program.

Makes me think of how race car manufacturers try to get a "road
worthiness stamp" for their race vehicles; these vehicles are primarily
race vehicles, not road vehicles, but if they can get a road-worthiness
stamp for it aswell, then that's great!

If you start off writing a program with no intention of prohibiting
yourself from using C++ features, and still end up with a finished
product which doesn't use C++ features, then it's quite like setting out
to design a race car, and ending up with a car that's also road-worthy.

I compare the ability to "compile as C" with a "road worthiness stamp" --
it's the icing on the cake!

I *never* hesitate to use C++ features, (and I actually use them quite
often), but if I did some day produce a program which didn't use any C++
features at all, I'd consider going back through it and changing
everything to C.

If you're after versatility, it's better to have C code than C++ code.
--

Frederick Gotham
Do we a favor and go away

Jul 4 '06 #4

P: n/a
Frederick Gotham wrote:
The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".
To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think is
English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++", which
means nothing. Proof of that is in your next scribbling:
>
If I were to write a program which didn't use the extended features which
C++ provides over C, then I'd call it a C program.
You can call it a C program, but you'd be wrong. You can call it
"Fortran" or "Lisp", which don't use the "extended features which C++
provides," but you would probably be wrong then. C and C++ differ at a
level more fundamental than whatever you think the "extended features
which C++ provides over C" are.
Makes me think of how race car manufacturers try to get a "road
worthiness stamp" for their race vehicles; these vehicles are primarily
race vehicles, not road vehicles, but if they can get a road-worthiness
stamp for it aswell, then that's great!
The above was wrong in the first three words. You don't think, so
nothing could have made you do so.
Jul 4 '06 #5

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qu******@yahoo.com posted:

Do we a favor and go away

Here let me give you a lesson in English:
When the 1st person plural pronoun appears as the subject of the
sentence, its form is "us", rather than "we".

Unless of course "we" was a typo for "me"... ?
I'll pack my bags straight away -- please accept my sincerest apologies for
intruding on your territory. I shall sit in a poorly lit room drinking
Bourbon for the rest of my days, contemplating why I ever intruded on the
territory of an illiterate, pretentious imbecile.
--

Frederick Gotham
Jul 4 '06 #6

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Martin Ambuhl posted:
Frederick Gotham wrote:
>The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".

To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think
is English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++", which
means nothing.

If I say:

I want to ride to the market on a horse or a donkey.
Am I implying that there's such a creature as a "horse or donkey"?

How about you demonstrate some intellect?

C and C++ differ at a level more fundamental than whatever you think
the "extended features which C++ provides over C" are.

I program in both languages, and I know where they differ -- and the
differences are minor, *very* minor.

Here's some examples of extended features which C++ provides over C:

(1) References
(2) Classes
(3) Templates

>Makes me think of how race car manufacturers try to get a "road
worthiness stamp" for their race vehicles; these vehicles are
primarily race vehicles, not road vehicles, but if they can get a
road-worthiness stamp for it aswell, then that's great!

The above was wrong in the first three words. You don't think, so
nothing could have made you do so.

Here you portray yourself as rude, obnoxious, and downright stupid -- but
to what end? You post here because you want to post here, but yet you
insult your audience, thus destroying any chance of enjoyable discussion.

Perhaps you should join a cult or go through some sort of phase... "find
yourself" and all that.
--

Frederick Gotham
Jul 4 '06 #7

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Frederick Gotham wrote:
Martin Ambuhl posted:

>>Frederick Gotham wrote:

>>>The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".

To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think
is English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++", which
means nothing.

If I say:

I want to ride to the market on a horse or a donkey.
Shouldn't that be on a horse/donkey? See how silly it looks.

--
Ian Collins.
Jul 4 '06 #8

P: n/a
<qu******@yahoo.comwrote
Hi, can anyone point me a library that can read image to memory from a
URL? It is very easy in Java, but it is hard to find an complete
solution in c/c++.
Unfortunately the standard library doesn't provide any functions to read in
images, nor any support for networking code.
Writing a JPEG or GIF decoder from scratch is non-trivial.
However it is likely that something exists for your platform, if you look
hard enough.
--
Buy my book 12 Common Atheist Arguments (refuted)
$1.25 download or $7.20 paper, available www.lulu.com/bgy1mm
Jul 4 '06 #9

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Once again, please go away.

Frederick Gotham wrote:
qu******@yahoo.com posted:

Do we a favor and go away


Here let me give you a lesson in English:
When the 1st person plural pronoun appears as the subject of the
sentence, its form is "us", rather than "we".

Unless of course "we" was a typo for "me"... ?
I'll pack my bags straight away -- please accept my sincerest apologies for
intruding on your territory. I shall sit in a poorly lit room drinking
Bourbon for the rest of my days, contemplating why I ever intruded on the
territory of an illiterate, pretentious imbecile.
--

Frederick Gotham
Jul 4 '06 #10

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"Malcolm" <re*******@btinternet.comwrites:
><qu******@yahoo.comwrote
>Hi, can anyone point me a library that can read image to memory from a
URL? It is very easy in Java, but it is hard to find an complete
solution in c/c++.
If the OP is still listening, and needs their faith in
newsgroups restored, you may like to look at the libcurl library
(http://curl.haxx.se/) for reading data from URLs and, possibly, the GD
library (http://www.boutell.com/gd/) for processing some image formats.

--
Chris.
Jul 4 '06 #11

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qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Once again, please go away.

[redacted]
Is there a particular reason we should listen to someone who doesn't
even know enough about this newsgroup to read the FAQs and realize that
top-posting is not appropriate?
Jul 4 '06 #12

P: n/a
qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Hi, can anyone point me a library that can read image to memory from a
URL? It is very easy in Java, but it is hard to find an complete
solution in c/c++.

Thanks,
If you use lcc-win32 you can use:
geturl(char *url,char *localfileName);

http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32
Jul 4 '06 #13

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Please do not think that all people in this
group are like that guy.

jacob
Jul 4 '06 #14

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Martin Ambuhl wrote:
Frederick Gotham wrote:
>The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".


To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think is
English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++", which
means nothing. Proof of that is in your next scribbling:
Excuse me but the differences between C/C++ are like american
english and UK english, if you take out C++ extensions.

Why be pedantic man?

It is OBVIOUS TO MOST PEOPLE (besides the pedantic ones) what the
original poster wanted.

>>
If I were to write a program which didn't use the extended features
which C++ provides over C, then I'd call it a C program.


You can call it a C program, but you'd be wrong. You can call it
"Fortran" or "Lisp", which don't use the "extended features which C++
provides," but you would probably be wrong then. C and C++ differ at a
level more fundamental than whatever you think the "extended features
which C++ provides over C" are.
Yes, like american and UK english. They differ at a fundamental
level.
>Makes me think of how race car manufacturers try to get a "road
worthiness stamp" for their race vehicles; these vehicles are
primarily race vehicles, not road vehicles, but if they can get a
road-worthiness stamp for it aswell, then that's great!


The above was wrong in the first three words. You don't think, so
nothing could have made you do so.
And when you have no more arguments, a personal insult is always
ready. How easy is for you to insult people but how hard is to remain
calm when answering to you.

when answeri
Jul 4 '06 #15

P: n/a
Frederick Gotham wrote:
Ian Collins posted:
qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Hi, can anyone point me a library that can read image to memory from
a URL? It is very easy in Java, but it is hard to find an complete
solution in c/c++.
Maybe because the mythical language of C/C++ doesn't exit?


The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".
It could refer to that, or to the common subset of C and C++, or a mix
of C and C++ as accepted by some particular compiler (for example, C++
plus variable-length arrays), or maybe even something entirely
different. For example, if someone answers claiming to have found a
solution in c/c++, do you think the exact language is intentionally not
specified, or do you think it means the solution is both valid C and
valid C++ ?

Jul 4 '06 #16

P: n/a
Frederick Gotham wrote:
Martin Ambuhl posted:
>C and C++ differ at a level more fundamental than whatever you think
the "extended features which C++ provides over C" are.


I program in both languages, and I know where they differ -- and the
differences are minor, *very* minor.
You may or may not know C; you may or may not know C++. The above
proves that you do not know both, however. Until you do, please stick
to whichever one you *do* know and post only to its newsgroup.
Jul 4 '06 #17

P: n/a
jacob wrote:
Martin Ambuhl wrote:
>Frederick Gotham wrote:
>>The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".


To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think
is English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++", which
means nothing. Proof of that is in your next scribbling:

Excuse me but the differences between C/C++ are like american
english and UK english, if you take out C++ extensions.
Thus, "jacob" proves only that he does not know enough to have an
informed opinion.
>
Why be pedantic man?
First tell me, "jacob", is there a reason you want to appear an idiot?
Jul 4 '06 #18

P: n/a
Martin Ambuhl wrote:
jacob wrote:
>Martin Ambuhl wrote:
>>Frederick Gotham wrote:

The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".

To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think
is English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++",
which means nothing. Proof of that is in your next scribbling:

Excuse me but the differences between C/C++ are like american
english and UK english, if you take out C++ extensions.


Thus, "jacob" proves only that he does not know enough to have an
informed opinion.
>>
Why be pedantic man?


First tell me, "jacob", is there a reason you want to appear an idiot?
When there are no longer any *arguments* left, people that do not know
any better have only insults.

The (well documented) differences between C and C++ are minor.
Some stuff requires a cast in C++ and do not require one in
C (the void pointer problem) and similar details. I would accept
somebody disagreeing with this, it is a matter of opinion what
"minor" is anyway.

What I find disgusting are the people that are unable to support
any disagreement even in the slightest terms, and immediately
start insulting other discussion participants with "idiot",
"imbecile" and other stuff.

This people are NOT representative of this group nor of the
majority of C users.

jacob

Jul 4 '06 #19

P: n/a
* Martin Ambuhl:
jacob wrote:
>Martin Ambuhl wrote:
>>Frederick Gotham wrote:

The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".
To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think
is English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++",
which means nothing. Proof of that is in your next scribbling:

Excuse me but the differences between C/C++ are like american
english and UK english, if you take out C++ extensions.

Thus, "jacob" proves only that he does not know enough to have an
informed opinion.
>>
Why be pedantic man?

First tell me, "jacob", is there a reason you want to appear an idiot?
A "jacob" that recommends an LCC solution, /could/ that be Jacob Navia?
Assuming it is, this group is great fun. It would be like someone
over in clc++ calling Bjarne Stroustrup an idiot.

--
A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
Q: Why is it such a bad thing?
A: Top-posting.
Q: What is the most annoying thing on usenet and in e-mail?
Jul 4 '06 #20

P: n/a
Martin Ambuhl wrote:
jacob wrote:
Martin Ambuhl wrote:
Frederick Gotham wrote:

The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".
To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think
is English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++", which
means nothing. Proof of that is in your next scribbling:
Excuse me but the differences between C/C++ are like american
english and UK english, if you take out C++ extensions.

Thus, "jacob" proves only that he does not know enough to have an
informed opinion.

Why be pedantic man?

First tell me, "jacob", is there a reason you want to appear an idiot?
perhaps a brand with a lower caffeine level is called for?
--
Nick Keighley

Jul 4 '06 #21

P: n/a
"Alf P. Steinbach" <al***@start.nowrote:
* Martin Ambuhl:
jacob wrote:
Martin Ambuhl wrote:
Frederick Gotham wrote:

The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".

To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think
is English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++",
which means nothing. Proof of that is in your next scribbling:

Excuse me but the differences between C/C++ are like american
english and UK english, if you take out C++ extensions.
Thus, "jacob" proves only that he does not know enough to have an
informed opinion.
>
Why be pedantic man?
First tell me, "jacob", is there a reason you want to appear an idiot?
Who says he _wants_ to? He has never seemed able to stop himself, but I
haven't seen evidence that this is intentional.
A "jacob" that recommends an LCC solution, /could/ that be Jacob Navia?
Gosh, would it?
Assuming it is, this group is great fun. It would be like someone
over in clc++ calling Bjarne Stroustrup an idiot.
No... the difference is that Stroustrup is _not_ an idiot. I may not
agree with some fundamental decisions he made in C++, but the way he
made them indicates that he isn't stupid, he just doesn't share my
opinions - big surprise there. Jacob, OTOH...

Richard
Jul 4 '06 #22

P: n/a
That's a lengthy discussion with no particular reason.

What is there in saying C/C++ and C or C++? I don't want to start an
argument. If you can understand what other's want to say, that's
enough. You are brilliant.

I think Frederick is with the person who started the thread. Funniest
thing is that he is asking Fred to go away.

-- Murali Krishna

Jul 4 '06 #23

P: n/a
In article <11*********************@75g2000cwc.googlegroups.c om>,
Murali Krishna <pm*********@gmail.comwrote:
>That's a lengthy discussion with no particular reason.

What is there in saying C/C++ and C or C++? I don't want to start an
argument. If you can understand what other's want to say, that's
enough. You are brilliant.
There is something about the phrase "C/C++" that marks the speaker as
not being a hacker - as being a marketing-oriented person.

And that galls the regulars (and rightly so!)

I really think that's the core of the issue. It's certainly not the
case that these supposedly smart, so called "regulars" don't understand
what you mean when you say it.
>I think Frederick is with the person who started the thread. Funniest
thing is that he is asking Fred to go away.
I think the "go away" stuff is an artifact of the cross-posting.
I see that now this is just clc and clc++, but I think (and I could be
wrong) that originally, it was spammed^Wposted to a whole bunch of
groups - and that always leads to a fragmented and weird discussion path.

Jul 4 '06 #24

P: n/a
Murali Krishna wrote:
.... snip ...
What is there in saying C/C++ and C or C++?
Nothing, though some people will find exception to either forms of
usage. Admittedly each group has valid points in support of their
usage.

Many posters have explained the subtle incompatibilities between
conformant C99 and C++ programs. More importantly both the langauges
are slowly but surely diverging in terms of areas of applicability,
library support and syntax. Also the programming methods encouraged by
the langauges are different. Their binary interfaces are different.

All this means that though mixing C and C++ code is perfectly allright,
one should be aware of the small differences between these languages,
which makes them, in a very real sense, seperate langauges, (though
they are obviously very closely related also), and not blindly follow
the trend to throw out the label C/C++.
I don't want to start an
argument. If you can understand what other's want to say, that's
enough. You are brilliant.
You can understand what others say only when there is a set of
standardised terms and meanings, not when everyone start to slightly
modify them to suit their own intents.

Jul 4 '06 #25

P: n/a
Murali Krishna wrote:
That's a lengthy discussion with no particular reason.
.... snip ...

Please quote the post to which you're replying. Not all readers of
Usenet can have easy or permanent access to previous posts and without
context, your reply makes little sense. If you're using Google Groups
then read the following URLs for more information on how to do it.

<http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
<http://www.safalra.com/special/googlegroupsreply/>

Jul 4 '06 #26

P: n/a
On 2006-07-04, jacob <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:
Martin Ambuhl wrote:
>Frederick Gotham wrote:
>>The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".


To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think is
English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++", which
means nothing. Proof of that is in your next scribbling:

Excuse me but the differences between C/C++ are like american
english and UK english, if you take out C++ extensions.

Why be pedantic man?

It is OBVIOUS TO MOST PEOPLE (besides the pedantic ones) what the
original poster wanted.
A: I want a solution in Perl/Awk.
B: What?
A: Perl/Awk. It's what my compiler supports.
B: Those are completely separate languages.
A: I mean the common subset of Perl and Awk!
B: That's not very useful; it's like, two functions.
A: Don't you know anything about UNIX? Stop being such a pedant.
....

And that's this entire conversation, except that A and B are both
several people.

The quickest answer to the OP's question is: Not in standard C, but
in the Navia compiler, if you really want to stoop to that level.

--
Andrew Poelstra <http://www.wpsoftware.net/blog>
To email me, use "apoelstra" at the above address.
"You people hate mathematics." -- James Harris
Jul 4 '06 #27

P: n/a
On 2006-07-04, Andrew Poelstra <ap*******@localhost.localdomainwrote:
On 2006-07-04, jacob <ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:
>Martin Ambuhl wrote:
>>Frederick Gotham wrote:

The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".
To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think is
English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++", which
means nothing. Proof of that is in your next scribbling:

Excuse me but the differences between C/C++ are like american
english and UK english, if you take out C++ extensions.

Why be pedantic man?

It is OBVIOUS TO MOST PEOPLE (besides the pedantic ones) what the
original poster wanted.

A: I want a solution in Perl/Awk.
B: What?
A: Perl/Awk. It's what my compiler supports.
B: Those are completely separate languages.
A: I mean the common subset of Perl and Awk!
B: That's not very useful; it's like, two functions.
A: Don't you know anything about UNIX? Stop being such a pedant.
...

And that's this entire conversation, except that A and B are both
several people.

The quickest answer to the OP's question is: Not in standard C, but
in the Navia compiler, if you really want to stoop to that level.
Before someone attacks me, I know that neither perl nor awk are compiled
languages. I also know that capitalizing them that way all the time
makes me look like a marketing guy. (I'm not, and normally I don't.)

--
Andrew Poelstra <http://www.wpsoftware.net/blog>
To email me, use "apoelstra" at the above address.
"You people hate mathematics." -- James Harris
Jul 4 '06 #28

P: n/a
Martin Ambuhl posted:
Frederick Gotham wrote:
>Martin Ambuhl posted:
>>C and C++ differ at a level more fundamental than whatever you think
the "extended features which C++ provides over C" are.


I program in both languages, and I know where they differ -- and the
differences are minor, *very* minor.

You may or may not know C; you may or may not know C++. The above
proves that you do not know both, however. Until you do, please stick
to whichever one you *do* know and post only to its newsgroup.

How about I disregard everything you say -- yes, I like that.
--

Frederick Gotham
Jul 4 '06 #29

P: n/a
In article <11*********************@m79g2000cwm.googlegroups. com>,
santosh <sa*********@gmail.comwrote:
>Murali Krishna wrote:
>That's a lengthy discussion with no particular reason.
... snip ...

Please quote the post to which you're replying. Not all readers of
Usenet can have easy or permanent access to previous posts and without
context, your reply makes little sense. If you're using Google Groups
then read the following URLs for more information on how to do it.

<http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
<http://www.safalra.com/special/googlegroupsreply/>
Here are some more useful URLs for navigating these turbulent waters:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clique
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspergers
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_programming_language

Jul 4 '06 #30

P: n/a
In article <sl**********************@localhost.localdomain> ,
Andrew Poelstra <ap*******@localhost.localdomainwrote:
....
>A: I want a solution in Perl/Awk.
B: What?
A: Perl/Awk. It's what my compiler supports.
B: Those are completely separate languages.
A: I mean the common subset of Perl and Awk!
B: That's not very useful; it's like, two functions.
A: Don't you know anything about UNIX? Stop being such a pedant.
Actually, a lot of people do write things like awk/perl/python/sed
and consider them all pretty much the same thing.

Which they are, when viewed from a certain perspective (that is, without
knowing much about any of them).

So, your ironic/sarcastic (heh heh) example is not as far fetched as you
might have thought.

Jul 4 '06 #31

P: n/a
On Tue, 04 Jul 2006 00:19:21 GMT, in comp.lang.c , Frederick Gotham
<fg*******@SPAM.comwrote:
>Ian Collins posted:
>qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
>>Hi, can anyone point me a library that can read image to memory from
a URL? It is very easy in Java, but it is hard to find an complete
solution in c/c++.
Maybe because the mythical language of C/C++ doesn't exit?


The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".
No. All too often they refer to "C and C++" as though the two were
near synonyms, and they reflect a lack of understanding on the part of
the poster that the two languages are significantly different.

Try the same construct with two different languages, and see if it
still makes sense.

--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Jul 4 '06 #32

P: n/a
On Tue, 04 Jul 2006 02:12:51 GMT, in comp.lang.c , Frederick Gotham
<fg*******@SPAM.comwrote:
>Martin Ambuhl posted:
>C and C++ differ at a level more fundamental than whatever you think
the "extended features which C++ provides over C" are.


I program in both languages, and I know where they differ -- and the
differences are minor, *very* minor.
This is about as wrong as its possible to be, and still be in the same
plane of reality.
>Here's some examples of extended features which C++ provides over C:

(1) References
(2) Classes
(3) Templates
You missed out about a thousand other features in C++ but not in C,
and a similar host in C but not in C++.
>Here you portray yourself as rude, obnoxious, and downright stupid -- but
to what end?
Perhaps because you're showing remarkably little evidence of actually
thinking. Come on, you surely know better than this, C and C++ are
very different.
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Jul 4 '06 #33

P: n/a
On Tue, 04 Jul 2006 15:25:34 GMT, in comp.lang.c , Frederick Gotham
<fg*******@SPAM.comwrote:
>
How about I disregard everything you say -- yes, I like that.
Smart move.

Welcome to the killfile of about half the regulars here.

The rest will be watching specially for your posts, so they can
correct the schoolboy errors.

--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Jul 4 '06 #34

P: n/a
On Tue, 04 Jul 2006 15:39:37 +0200, in comp.lang.c , jacob
<ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:
>Martin Ambuhl wrote:
>jacob wrote:
>>Martin Ambuhl wrote:

Frederick Gotham wrote:

The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".

To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think
is English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++",
which means nothing. Proof of that is in your next scribbling:
Excuse me but the differences between C/C++ are like american
english and UK english, if you take out C++ extensions.


Thus, "jacob" proves only that he does not know enough to have an
informed opinion.
>>>
Why be pedantic man?


First tell me, "jacob", is there a reason you want to appear an idiot?

When there are no longer any *arguments* left, people that do not know
any better have only insults.
Actually, it was probably because you made an idiotic remark. The fix
is probably to avoid emitting asinine comments, like these...

>The (well documented) differences between C and C++ are minor.
Some stuff requires a cast in C++ and do not require one in
C (the void pointer problem) and similar details.
Not to mention different keywords, different sizes of some objects,
different handling of recursion, exception handling, different IO
routines, different memory management routines, different fundamental
types, and so on.
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Jul 4 '06 #35

P: n/a
On 3 Jul 2006 16:30:05 -0700, in comp.lang.c , "qu******@yahoo.com"
<qu******@yahoo.comwrote:
>Hi, can anyone point me a library that can read image to memory from a
URL? It is very easy in Java, but it is hard to find an complete
solution in c/c++.
Take a look at the code for "wget".

Heck, you can even use it directly.
system("wget someurl");
--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Jul 4 '06 #36

P: n/a
Mark McIntyre posted:
On Tue, 04 Jul 2006 15:25:34 GMT, in comp.lang.c , Frederick Gotham
<fg*******@SPAM.comwrote:
>>
How about I disregard everything you say -- yes, I like that.

Smart move.

Welcome to the killfile of about half the regulars here.

If by "half the regulars" you mean "half the regular trolls", then the
figure might be accurate.

As for you, you make minimal contribution to this group, both in terms of
programming prowess, and in terms of social interaction.

If the participants in the group were to vote, such a vote would
overwhelmingly convey that I make a greater contribution than you.

And at the end of the day, you're an imbecile.

The rest will be watching specially for your posts, so they can
correct the schoolboy errors.

I welcome it.

And while we're on the topic of "schoolboy errors", "specially" and
"especially" are two different words.

--

Frederick Gotham
Jul 4 '06 #37

P: n/a
Mark McIntyre posted:

>>Here you portray yourself as rude, obnoxious, and downright stupid --
but to what end?

Perhaps because you're showing remarkably little evidence of actually
thinking. Come on, you surely know better than this, C and C++ are
very different.

C and C++ are extremely similar -- more similar than humans and orangutans.

That's my viewpoint and it's not about to change.

I've no interest in interacting with you any further, Mark.
--

Frederick Gotham
Jul 4 '06 #38

P: n/a
Frederick Gotham wrote:
And at the end of the day, you're an imbecile.
Plonk

Jul 4 '06 #39

P: n/a
Frederick Gotham wrote:
Mark McIntyre posted:
>>>Here you portray yourself as rude, obnoxious, and downright stupid --
but to what end?

Perhaps because you're showing remarkably little evidence of actually
thinking. Come on, you surely know better than this, C and C++ are
very different.

C and C++ are extremely similar -- more similar than humans and orangutans.
This subject has been bludgeoned to death several times, mainly in the C
group, check the (recent) archives.

--
Ian Collins.
Jul 4 '06 #40

P: n/a
Mark McIntyre wrote:
On Tue, 04 Jul 2006 15:39:37 +0200, in comp.lang.c , jacob
<ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:
>>Martin Ambuhl wrote:
>>jacob wrote:

Martin Ambuhl wrote:

Frederick Gotham wrote:
>
>The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".
>
>
>
To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think
is English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++",
which means nothing. Proof of that is in your next scribbling:
>

Excuse me but the differences between C/C++ are like american
english and UK english, if you take out C++ extensions.
Thus, "jacob" proves only that he does not know enough to have an
informed opinion.
Why be pedantic man?
First tell me, "jacob", is there a reason you want to appear an idiot?

When there are no longer any *arguments* left, people that do not know
any better have only insults.

Actually, it was probably because you made an idiotic remark. The fix
is probably to avoid emitting asinine comments, like these...
I would conjecture that it was because Martin Ambuhl and you ignored the
clause "if you take out C++ extensions". That phrase is a little vague and
requires interpretation. However, vagueness does not provide a license to
ignore the phrase completely and pretend the poster did not know about the
differences between C and C++.

>>The (well documented) differences between C and C++ are minor.
Some stuff requires a cast in C++ and do not require one in
C (the void pointer problem) and similar details.

Not to mention different keywords,
Which ones (when you take out C++ extensions)?
different sizes of some objects,
ok. However, that applies to different implementation of the same language,
too: many sizes are underspecified by the standards.
different handling of recursion,
could you elaborate on this one
exception handling,
Isn't that a C++ extension?
different IO routines,
The stream IO, I would consider an extension. What are the huge (not minor)
differences between C and C++ with regard to the printf family?
different memory management routines,
new/delete is an extension. What are the big differences in malloc/free
between C and C++?
different fundamental types,
ok.
and so on.


Best

Kai-Uwe Bux
Jul 4 '06 #41

P: n/a
On 2006-07-04, Kai-Uwe Bux <jk********@gmx.netwrote:
Mark McIntyre wrote:
>On Tue, 04 Jul 2006 15:39:37 +0200, in comp.lang.c , jacob
<ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:
>>>Martin Ambuhl wrote:
jacob wrote:

Martin Ambuhl wrote:
>
>Frederick Gotham wrote:
>>
>>The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".
>>
>>
>>
>To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you think
>is English, in addition to your first private language, "C/C++",
>which means nothing. Proof of that is in your next scribbling:
>>
>
Excuse me but the differences between C/C++ are like american
english and UK english, if you take out C++ extensions.
Thus, "jacob" proves only that he does not know enough to have an
informed opinion.

>
Why be pedantic man?
First tell me, "jacob", is there a reason you want to appear an idiot?

When there are no longer any *arguments* left, people that do not know
any better have only insults.

Actually, it was probably because you made an idiotic remark. The fix
is probably to avoid emitting asinine comments, like these...

I would conjecture that it was because Martin Ambuhl and you ignored the
clause "if you take out C++ extensions". That phrase is a little vague and
requires interpretation. However, vagueness does not provide a license to
ignore the phrase completely and pretend the poster did not know about the
differences between C and C++.
Vagueness is indeed a licence for ignoring something. If I don't know what
something means because the poster was too lazy to put it into plain English,
I don't know why I should have to suffer.
>>>The (well documented) differences between C and C++ are minor.
Some stuff requires a cast in C++ and do not require one in
C (the void pointer problem) and similar details.

Not to mention different keywords,

Which ones (when you take out C++ extensions)?
bool, class, new, delete...
>exception handling,
Isn't that a C++ extension?
What's a "C++ extension"? It's part of the language. You might as
well insist that malloc() is a C extension because it isn't a part
of Java.

Wait... Java isn't C, and neither is C++.
>different IO routines,

The stream IO, I would consider an extension. What are the huge (not minor)
differences between C and C++ with regard to the printf family?
I consider PRINT an extension, so therefore BASIC and C are the same.
Conversely, printf() is a C extension, and therefore can be ignored as
a non-BASIC contruct.
>different memory management routines,

new/delete is an extension. What are the big differences in malloc/free
between C and C++?
malloc/free is an extension of C. See how flimsy that line of logic is?

--
Andrew Poelstra <http://www.wpsoftware.net/projects/>
To email me, use "apoelstra" at the above address.
"You people hate mathematics." -- James Harris
Jul 4 '06 #42

P: n/a
Andrew Poelstra wrote:
On 2006-07-04, Kai-Uwe Bux <jk********@gmx.netwrote:
>Mark McIntyre wrote:
>>On Tue, 04 Jul 2006 15:39:37 +0200, in comp.lang.c , jacob
<ja***@jacob.remcomp.frwrote:

Martin Ambuhl wrote:
jacob wrote:
>
>Martin Ambuhl wrote:
>>
>>Frederick Gotham wrote:
>>>
>>>The 5 consecutive characters, "C/C++", refer to "C or C++".
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>To you, perhaps. You have a second private language, which you
>>think is English, in addition to your first private language,
>>"C/C++",
>>which means nothing. Proof of that is in your next scribbling:
>>>
>>
>Excuse me but the differences between C/C++ are like american
>english and UK english, if you take out C++ extensions.
>
>
Thus, "jacob" proves only that he does not know enough to have an
informed opinion.
>
>>
>Why be pedantic man?
>
>
First tell me, "jacob", is there a reason you want to appear an idiot?

When there are no longer any *arguments* left, people that do not know
any better have only insults.

Actually, it was probably because you made an idiotic remark. The fix
is probably to avoid emitting asinine comments, like these...

I would conjecture that it was because Martin Ambuhl and you ignored the
clause "if you take out C++ extensions". That phrase is a little vague
and requires interpretation. However, vagueness does not provide a
license to ignore the phrase completely and pretend the poster did not
know about the differences between C and C++.

Vagueness is indeed a licence for ignoring something.
Not if you want to arrive at a correct interpretation. The technical term
is "principle of charity". If you don't care about correct interpretation,
you are of course free to ignore whatever you like. However, insulting
remarks about other posters intellectual abilities are more credible if
they are based on a sound understanding of what those posters actually
belive. (Of course, they are impolite in any case.)
If I don't know what
something means because the poster was too lazy to put it into plain
English, I don't know why I should have to suffer.
If avoidance of suffering is what your goal, you are right: you may ignore
whatever makes you feel better.
>>>>The (well documented) differences between C and C++ are minor.
Some stuff requires a cast in C++ and do not require one in
C (the void pointer problem) and similar details.

Not to mention different keywords,

Which ones (when you take out C++ extensions)?

bool, class, new, delete...
See below for a definition of extension that takes care of your examples.
>
>>exception handling,
Isn't that a C++ extension?

What's a "C++ extension"?
Ok, let me propose a definition of "C++ extension" appropriate for the
context of this thread: a valid C++ program uses a C++ extension if either
it does not compile as a C program or does not have the same observable
behavior when compiled as a C program.

I think this definition is appropriate in our context, because in the
original posting

Excuse me but the differences between C/C++ are like american
english and UK english, if you take out C++ extensions.

the poster does not claim that C++ and C are alike. The claim is that after
removing C++ extensions, they are alike. I propose to read this as: a
certain subset of C++ is somewhat like C. Now, we have to figure out, which
subset the poster had in mind. The subset I propose to consider consists of
exactly those well-formed C++ programs that are valid C programs with
identical observable behavior under both standards (one could call this set
of programs the intersection of C and C++).

Under this interpretation, jacob claims that C and the intersection of C and
C++ are very much alike. I do not know whether I should agree, but I think
this is the claim one needs to address to properly criticize jacob.
[remarks based upon non-understanding of the term extension snipped]

Best

Kai-Uwe Bux
Jul 5 '06 #43

P: n/a
Kai-Uwe Bux posted:
The claim is that after removing C++ extensions, they are alike. I
propose to read this as: a certain subset of C++ is somewhat like C.
Now, we have to figure out, which subset the poster had in mind. The
subset I propose to consider consists of exactly those well-formed C++
programs that are valid C programs with identical observable behavior
under both standards (one could call this set of programs the
intersection of C and C++).

Under this interpretation, jacob claims that C and the intersection of
C and C++ are very much alike. I do not know whether I should agree,
but I think this is the claim one needs to address to properly
criticize jacob.

Very well worded.
The intersection of C and C++ are almost identical. One can easily memorise
the few inconsistencies. Here's a guide:
http://david.tribble.com/text/cdiffs.htm
--

Frederick Gotham
Jul 5 '06 #44

P: n/a
Frederick Gotham wrote:
Kai-Uwe Bux posted:

>>The claim is that after removing C++ extensions, they are alike. I
propose to read this as: a certain subset of C++ is somewhat like C.
Now, we have to figure out, which subset the poster had in mind. The
subset I propose to consider consists of exactly those well-formed C++
programs that are valid C programs with identical observable behavior
under both standards (one could call this set of programs the
intersection of C and C++).

Under this interpretation, jacob claims that C and the intersection of
C and C++ are very much alike. I do not know whether I should agree,
but I think this is the claim one needs to address to properly
criticize jacob.

Very well worded.

The intersection of C and C++ are almost identical. One can easily memorise
the few inconsistencies. Here's a guide:

http://david.tribble.com/text/cdiffs.htm
That list is pretty comprehensive and lists more than a "few" differences..

--
Ian Collins.
Jul 5 '06 #45

P: n/a
Mark McIntyre wrote:
Frederick Gotham <fg*******@SPAM.comwrote:

How about I disregard everything you say -- yes, I like that.

Smart move.

Welcome to the killfile of about half the regulars here.

The rest will be watching specially for your posts, so they can
correct the schoolboy errors.
Note for killfilers: this is the same person as "JKop" and "Tomas".

Jul 5 '06 #46

P: n/a
Ian Collins posted:

>http://david.tribble.com/text/cdiffs.htm
That list is pretty comprehensive and lists more than a "few"
differences..

The more you familiarise yourself with something and the more you use it,
the more you memorise. I regularly switch from coding C to coding C++, and
I am very familiar with the inconsistencies.

C++ is virtually an exact superset of C.

It takes less than one week for a proficient C++ programmer to become a
proficient C programmer.
--

Frederick Gotham
Jul 5 '06 #47

P: n/a
Old Wolf posted:

Note for killfilers: this is the same person as "JKop" and "Tomas".

Oh yes, more accusations of having posted under other aliases, although
this time on the C++ side of the water. Thankfully I was acquitted of any
wrongdoing on the C side of the water, and I can console myself that on
this occasion, the accusation is made by a troll who would prefer to
discuss a poster's posting history rather than computer programming.

Old Wolf, I have read yours and Tomas's posts regarding you accusing him
of previously posting under the alias of JKop, and I can relate to you
that you shall get no such discussion out of me. Whether I have in the
past posted under other aliases is my own business, and I am here to
discuss programming.

At the end of the day, there are participants here who judge a poster by
the quality of her posts, and it is these people with whom I was to
interact. The others may feel free to killfile me -- in fact, I welcome
it.

Old Wolf, comp.lang.c++ is for discussion of the C++ programming
language, so if you wish to make infantile accusations regarding
participants' posting habits (past or present), please take the
discussion elsewhere.

--

Frederick Gotham
Jul 5 '06 #48

P: n/a
Frederick Gotham wrote:
Ian Collins posted:
>>>http://david.tribble.com/text/cdiffs.htm

That list is pretty comprehensive and lists more than a "few"
differences..

The more you familiarise yourself with something and the more you use it,
the more you memorise. I regularly switch from coding C to coding C++, and
I am very familiar with the inconsistencies.

C++ is virtually an exact superset of C.
Well it looks like our interpretations of the virtually differ somewhat.
It takes less than one week for a proficient C++ programmer to become a
proficient C programmer.
I guess that depends where you set the bar.

--
Ian Collins.
Jul 5 '06 #49

P: n/a
Frederick Gotham wrote:
Old Wolf, comp.lang.c++ is for discussion of the C++ programming
language, so if you wish to make infantile accusations regarding
participants' posting habits (past or present), please take the
discussion elsewhere.
Well, I would if you would actually provide a valid email address,
or perhaps suggest some other forum where you would like to
discuss the matter.

Jul 5 '06 #50

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