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How to connect SQL database in C programs

P: n/a
Hi Everybody,

I am doing a project and I desire to know can we connect SQL
database in C programs and use them ? Can any body can help me? Please
explain me the whole concept & give me the code also ..
I will be really greatful.....

Any help would be appreciated.

PS:- Its urgent

Thank's
Sachin

Jun 25 '06 #1
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15 Replies


P: n/a

Sachin wrote:
Hi Everybody,

I am doing a project and I desire to know can we connect SQL
database in C programs and use them ? Can any body can help me? Please
explain me the whole concept & give me the code also ..
I will be really greatful.....

Any help would be appreciated.


whois on posting IP ... india...

I guess you skipped that whole "go to school" bit before you accepted
an out sourced job?

Tom

/me in bad mood...

Jun 25 '06 #2

P: n/a
"Sachin" <sh****************@gmail.com> writes:
I am doing a project and I desire to know can we connect SQL
database in C programs and use them ? Can any body can help me? Please
explain me the whole concept & give me the code also ..
I will be really greatful.....

Any help would be appreciated.
Standard C, which is what we discuss here, has no concept of SQL. We
can't help you. You might be able to help yourself by (a) reading any
documentation you might have, (b) doing a web search, and/or (c)
posting to an appropriate newsgroup (sorry, I don't know which one
that would be).
PS:- Its urgent


Waiting until it became urgent, then posting to Usenet, was probably
not the best strategy.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
Jun 26 '06 #3

P: n/a
Sachin a écrit :
Hi Everybody,

I am doing a project and I desire to know can we connect SQL
database in C programs and use them ? Can any body can help me? Please
explain me the whole concept & give me the code also ..
I will be really greatful.....

Any help would be appreciated.

PS:- Its urgent

Thank's
Sachin

You want everything isn't it? Please explain me the whole concept & give me the code also ..


OK. Just give us the address of your teacher and we will send
the code to him. There is no point to send it to you since
you seem to know NOTHING about this subject...
Jun 26 '06 #4

P: n/a
jacob navia wrote:
> Please explain me the whole concept & give me the code also ..


OK. Just give us the address of your teacher and we will send
the code to him. There is no point to send it to you since
you seem to know NOTHING about this subject...


Dude, look at the posting IP.

It may be politically incorrect to say it but chances are he works at a
development firm, outsourced so effectively from another country. The
fact that the poster obviously has no idea of what they're doing isn't
surprising.

I'm all for equal employment across the globe. But scenarios like this
piss me off. Because it's us, the customer, who usually pay the price
in terms of shoddy applications that speak Engrish, have incomplete
piss-poor user manuals and need 17 levels of patching to do anything
useful.

Clearly the OP wants a snippet they can copy/paste into their
"application" that they are "developing". Any help we [could] give
them would just further undermine our profession.

Tom

Jun 26 '06 #5

P: n/a
On 25 Jun 2006 15:45:52 -0700, "Sachin" <sh****************@gmail.com>
wrote:
can we connect SQL database in C programs and use them


Kind of yes, SQLite provides your applications a SQL database program
that can be carried with your C projects. Including SQLlite into your
application will increase their sice by some 300kB. SQLlite implements
most of the SQL92 features and is available for many platforms.
Additional anti-bad thing is of cause that it is provided as a public
domain code.

Place to start:
http://www.sqlite.org/faq.html
Juuso Hukkanen
http://www.tele3d.com
(to reply by e-mail set addresses month and year to correct)

Jun 26 '06 #6

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On 26 Jun 2006 02:58:26 -0700, "Tom St Denis" <to********@gmail.com>
wrote:

<OT>
Dude, look at the posting IP.

It may be politically incorrect to say it but chances are he works at a
development firm, outsourced so effectively from another country. I'm all for equal employment across the globe.
Very good, I like that.
Because it's us, the customer, who usually pay the price
in terms of shoddy applications that speak Engrish, have incomplete
piss-poor user manuals and need 17 levels of patching to do anything
useful.


That is where a 'western' standard project management software and
'western quality' spell checkers can help Sachin & his friends to
improve the products they make. Not to mention 'western standard of
quality' help- application makers, 'trustworthy western' payment
systems...

You see, outsourcing technology jobs to developing countries, boosts
their economy, but it makes them to become fresh interesting markets;
with other words soon a billion Indians and Chinese and Togoans are
happily downloading LTC in order to use those with their their MAD-64
processors.
http://www.freetrade.org/pubs/briefs/tbp-019.pdf

To prove that point, think how much Russias were able to buy European
cars during the 1980's, now as equal trade partners the road leading
from Mercedes and Wolksvagen factories to Russia has been re-asphalted
many times. Bonus is that trade partners are less unlike to threaten
each others economy with wars and such.

Even Mr. Donald Trump at the Trump university's Trump blog thinks
"Outsourcing Creates Jobs in the Long Run" - So it is kind of
scientifically proven :)
http://donaldtrump.trumpuniversity.c...asp?item=98255

US unemployment rate is currently 4.6 %, so don't panic.

</OT>

Juuso
Jun 26 '06 #7

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On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 13:59:23 +0300, Juuso Hukkanen
<ju***********@tele3d.net> wrote:
Even Mr. Donald Trump at the Trump university's Trump blog thinks
"Outsourcing Creates Jobs in the Long Run" - So it is kind of
scientifically proven :)


Outsourcing may have helped to improve Mr. Trump's position in life,
but that's hardly scientific proof of anything.

BTW, I wasn't aware that Europe had outsourced vast quantities of work
to Russia at cut-rate prices.

Anyway, you miss the point. The point is that for the sake of saving a
few dollars this quarter, some company has sent software work to a
supplier who is obviously incompetent to do the job. They will pay for
this mistake in the long run, of course, but surely you can't blame
folks here for not wanting to do their work for them, at no cost.

In any case, the question is off-topic here.

--
Al Balmer
Sun City, AZ
Jun 26 '06 #8

P: n/a
On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 15:25:09 GMT, Al Balmer <al******@att.net> wrote:
Outsourcing may have helped to improve Mr. Trump's position in life,
but that's hardly scientific proof of anything.
Ok, I admit that but there are also economy studies that say
outsourcing be benefiting all parties at the macro-economic level.
http://in.rediff.com/money/2005/nov/02bpo2.htm
BTW, I wasn't aware that Europe had outsourced vast quantities of work
to Russia at cut-rate prices.
Oh yes, think a decade ago it was a country with a size of half of
USA's and full of educated people and a still working education
systems. Of cause lots of technology jobs have been created there and
especially in many of those East European former soviet block
countries.

About practical chances to outsource programming jobs to Russia, well
there is for example a Russian Software Developers Association
(RUSSOFT) and its 80 member organizations and 7000 developers; all
very interested for outsourcing projects from Europe or elsewhere.
http://www.russoft.org/russoft/

That's just global economy, but cheer up in absolute numbers the
technology jobs in USA aren't really disappearing; even if the
outsourcing increases it just helps making the cake bigger.
Anyway, you miss the point. The point is that for the sake of saving a
few dollars this quarter, some company has sent software work to a
supplier who is obviously incompetent to do the job.
Ok, Sachin's possible overseas contractor might be surprised one day
if the program would not behave as desired. But hey, Sachin may need
that SQL unit also for his university project OR to a hobby project at
a computer club OR for an urgent contract job he just received from
his local video store. C'mon should have I waited giving him and
answer until he took an oath, that his request was not related for any
off-shored job?
They will pay for this mistake in the long run, of course, but
surely you can't blame folks here for not wanting to do their
work for them, at no cost.


Perhaps CLC F.A.Q should contain a list of countries, to which lesser
quality answers would be adequate? I know you are not suggesting any
such restrictions (- and in that sense this is unfair), but my point
is that mixing CLC to politics of global economy is a bad idea. You
know, next requester from India or ... Vietnam might be a 12 year old
local nerd with bad "Engrish" and a crank-powered 100$ development aid
PC; doing child labour for a LOCAL contractor.
Sorry if you now feel like after 100 Touchées
Juuso Hukkanen
http://www.tele3d.com
(to reply by e-mail set addresses month and year to correct)

Jun 26 '06 #9

P: n/a
Tom St Denis wrote:
jacob navia wrote:
> Please explain me the whole concept & give me the code also ..


OK. Just give us the address of your teacher and we will send
the code to him. There is no point to send it to you since
you seem to know NOTHING about this subject...

Dude, look at the posting IP.

It may be politically incorrect to say it but chances are he works at a
development firm, outsourced so effectively from another country. The
fact that the poster obviously has no idea of what they're doing isn't
surprising.

I'm all for equal employment across the globe. But scenarios like this
piss me off. Because it's us, the customer, who usually pay the price
in terms of shoddy applications that speak Engrish, have incomplete
piss-poor user manuals and need 17 levels of patching to do anything
useful.

Clearly the OP wants a snippet they can copy/paste into their
"application" that they are "developing". Any help we [could] give
them would just further undermine our profession.

Tom


From www.spacedaily.com
Rising Salaries Threatens Booming Outsourcing Industry In India

Bangalore, India (AFP) Jun 25, 2006
Soaring salaries and poor quality of manpower are prompting foreign
firms to shut their outsourcing operations in India although there is no
cause for alarm yet, officials and analysts say.

US-based Apple Computer and software maker Pervasive have been joined by
Powergen, a British subsidiary of German energy supplier E.ON, in
announcing the closure of their centres in India's technology hub of
Bangalore.

"The potential cost savings of an offshore development operation can be
mathematically compelling," said John Farr, president and chief
executive officer of Pervasive Software.

"However, we have found that the complexity of managing such an
operation and the increasing costs of labour, employee turnover,
training and facilities in such a hot market as Bangalore makes it
challenging to realise those savings," Farr said.

The National Association for Software and Service Companies (NASSCOM),
India's premier software body, said salaries of freshers had shot up
between 11 percent and 15 percent in the past few years while wages for
senior managerial positions had risen by a whopping 30 percent.

Analysts said labour arbitrage for India existed only at the entry-level
where engineers earned about 9,000 dollars a year -- about one-seventh
of the wages being paid their counterparts in the United States.

Consultancy firm Stanton Chase International said salaries of managers
with 10 to 15 years experience in the US was between 100,000 dollars to
150,000 dollars (6.7 million rupees) while in India they were paid at
least 10 million rupees.

"During the start of the technology boom (in 1993) the top management
people were paid about three million rupees," G.C. Jayaprakash,
principal consultant of Stanton Chase, told AFP. "The most worrying
factor (for foreign firms) is the steep increase in salaries.

"Big companies such as Cisco, Motorola and others are only hiring
freshers and at lower managerial levels. This is for the simple reason
that IT managers from the US can be accommodated at a much cheaper
rate," he said.

Other than steep salaries the quality of manpower is also proving to be
a challenge for technology firms.

Powergen announced last week that call centres in India would no longer
be answering telephone calls from its customers due to complaints about
the poor standard of service.

Leo Puri, director in India of McKinsey and Company, said the industry
and the government needed to find ways of producing more "employable"
talent for the industry.

According to NASSCOM more than three million graduates pass out of
colleges every year and India produces 400,000 engineers anually but "of
this only a very small percentage is employable".

"Rising salaries ... is a long-term threat to the industry. In terms of
competitiveness it will hound the industry in the next three to five
years. That does not mean we must sound the alarm bells just because a
handful of firms leave," Puri said.

India continued to remain competitive compared to the Philippines or
Vietnam as labour arbitrage was only a secondary driver, he said.

"We have the capability to put together large quality oriented business
processes and have a track record of innovation. India can still deliver
a huge cost benefit and it will continue to do so for the next 15
years," Puri said.

India's software and outsourcing revenues are projected to grow between
27 percent to 30 percent in the current financial year to between 29
billion dollars and 31 billion dollars, according to NASSCOM.

Anant Koppar, president of Mphais Technologies, an outsourcing firm
which was acquired by US giant EDS earlier this month, said the
middle-level salary increase was mainly due to "supply constraints".

"We need to look at the people coming out of the institutes and make
them industry-ready. These engineers and graduates have to be tuned in
to industry's needs," Koppar said.

"The moment you have more people with skills the salary levels will come
down. Salary costs account for almost 60 percent of the total costs of a
firm," he said.

NASSCOM said it expected a shortage of 500,000 people in the outsourcing
sector in the next four years.

Sunil Mehta, vice president of NASSCOM, said despite the hurdles India
still dominated the outsourcing industry and domestic and multinational
companies operating in the country were turning profits.

"Those companies which employ fewer people and do not take advantge of
economies of scale are the ones that are facing problems," Mehta told AFP.

Source: Agence France-Presse
Jun 26 '06 #10

P: n/a
On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 15:25:09 GMT, in comp.lang.c , Al Balmer
<al******@att.net> wrote:
BTW, I wasn't aware that Europe had outsourced vast quantities of work
to Russia at cut-rate prices.


It hasn't.

--
Mark McIntyre

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
--Brian Kernighan
Jun 26 '06 #11

P: n/a
On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 21:36:56 +0100, Mark McIntyre
<ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote:

<OT>
<al******@att.net> wrote:
BTW, I wasn't aware that Europe had outsourced vast quantities of work
to Russia at cut-rate prices.


It hasn't.


That is mostly true. Al got the idea or Europeans being outsourcing
jobs to Russia from his own imagination - or at least not from me.
Althought many western companies have been putting all kinds of
factories factories there, I dont think it is due to outsourcing but
rather a sign of corporations expanding into new markets.

In my post to which Al replied, I mentioned the growth of Russian
economy to have made them equal trade partners; who happen to be now
bying lots of automobiles. And In my reply post to Al I did show
Russians to be organized and willing for doing outsourced programming
jobs, but not that a vast quantity of programming work would be
outsourced allredy.

Juuso
</OT>
Jun 26 '06 #12

P: n/a
Juuso Hukkanen <ju***********@tele3d.net> writes:
On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 21:36:56 +0100, Mark McIntyre
<ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote:

<OT>
<al******@att.net> wrote:
BTW, I wasn't aware that Europe had outsourced vast quantities of work
to Russia at cut-rate prices.


It hasn't.


That is mostly true. Al got the idea or Europeans being outsourcing
jobs to Russia from his own imagination - or at least not from me.
Althought many western companies have been putting all kinds of
factories factories there, I dont think it is due to outsourcing but
rather a sign of corporations expanding into new markets.

In my post to which Al replied, I mentioned the growth of Russian
economy to have made them equal trade partners; who happen to be now
bying lots of automobiles. And In my reply post to Al I did show
Russians to be organized and willing for doing outsourced programming
jobs, but not that a vast quantity of programming work would be
outsourced allredy.


They've stopped in Romania, for now. At least Siemens and Alcatel have
hired large numbers of programmers. If wages go much higher there may
be a chance that some companies will move farther east although, given
the amount of money they put into buildings and people, I doubt that.

--
Ioan - Ciprian Tandau
tandau _at_ freeshell _dot_ org (hope it's not too late)
(... and that it still works...)
Jun 26 '06 #13

P: n/a
On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 21:36:56 +0100, Mark McIntyre
<ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote:
On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 15:25:09 GMT, in comp.lang.c , Al Balmer
<al******@att.net> wrote:
BTW, I wasn't aware that Europe had outsourced vast quantities of work
to Russia at cut-rate prices.


It hasn't.


I know. Tell Jusso - it's his theory that requires it.

--
Al Balmer
Sun City, AZ
Jun 26 '06 #14

P: n/a
On Tue, 27 Jun 2006 01:42:25 +0300, Juuso Hukkanen
<ju***********@tele3d.net> wrote:
On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 21:36:56 +0100, Mark McIntyre
<ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote:

<OT>
<al******@att.net> wrote:
BTW, I wasn't aware that Europe had outsourced vast quantities of work
to Russia at cut-rate prices.
It hasn't.


That is mostly true. Al got the idea or Europeans being outsourcing
jobs to Russia from his own imagination - or at least not from me.
Althought many western companies have been putting all kinds of
factories factories there, I dont think it is due to outsourcing but
rather a sign of corporations expanding into new markets.


That was exactly my point. Your command of English seemed to be good
enough to support a bit of sarcasm. My apologies if I was wrong.

You were using the economic progress of Russia, somehow, to augment
your pro-outsourcing argument. I was pointing out (in an indirect way)
that it had little or nothing to do with outsourcing. Now, apparently,
you are agreeing with me.
In my post to which Al replied, I mentioned the growth of Russian
economy to have made them equal trade partners; who happen to be now
bying lots of automobiles. And In my reply post to Al I did show
Russians to be organized and willing for doing outsourced programming
jobs, but not that a vast quantity of programming work would be
outsourced allredy.

Juuso
</OT>


--
Al Balmer
Sun City, AZ
Jun 27 '06 #15

P: n/a
On Tue, 27 Jun 2006 00:03:15 GMT, Al Balmer <al******@att.net> wrote:

<OT>
Althought many western companies have been putting all kinds of
factories factories there, I dont think it is due to outsourcing but
rather a sign of corporations expanding into new markets.


That was exactly my point.


Now I see you are about 50% right :) I uncarefully said "To prove that
point" ... think Russia in a chapter following a chapter that listed
two agendas:
1) Outsourcing boost economies in developing countries, allowing those
2) fresh economies to start buing western Hi-Tech As customers

Ok, Russian economy is booming , which allows them to obtain lots of
western technology - like automobiles. Obviously the reason for why
it is booming is related to oil,gas and other natural resource prices
and very little to incomes obtained from off-shored technology
projects. My point was to show the developed economies as future
customers.

Sorry for confusion
Juuso
</OT>
Jun 27 '06 #16

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