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near-TeraHertz processors no dream

P: n/a
IBM and Georgia Tech Break Silicon Speed Record

IBM and the Georgia Institute of Technology announced today that their
researchers have demonstrated the first silicon-based chip capable of
operating at frequencies above 500 GHz -- 500 billion cycles per second
-- by cryogenically "freezing" the chip to 451 degrees below zero
Fahrenheit (4.5 Kelvins). Such extremely cold temperatures are found
naturally only in outer space, but can be artificially achieved on
Earth using ultra-cold materials such as liquid helium. (Absolute Zero,
the coldest possible temperature in nature, occurs at minus 459.67
degrees Fahrenheit).

http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pr...ease/19843.wss
http://www-03.ibm.com/developerworks...d_you_get_some

Jun 21 '06 #1
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v4vijayakumar wrote:
IBM and Georgia Tech Break Silicon Speed Record

IBM and the Georgia Institute of Technology announced today that their
researchers have demonstrated the first silicon-based chip capable of
operating at frequencies above 500 GHz -- 500 billion cycles per second
-- by cryogenically "freezing" the chip to 451 degrees below zero
Fahrenheit (4.5 Kelvins). Such extremely cold temperatures are found
naturally only in outer space, but can be artificially achieved on
Earth using ultra-cold materials such as liquid helium. (Absolute Zero,
the coldest possible temperature in nature, occurs at minus 459.67
degrees Fahrenheit).

http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pr...ease/19843.wss
http://www-03.ibm.com/developerworks...d_you_get_some


sorry, acedentally posted it here! :(

Jun 21 '06 #2

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v4vijayakumar wrote:
IBM and Georgia Tech Break Silicon Speed Record

IBM and the Georgia Institute of Technology announced today that their
researchers have demonstrated the first silicon-based chip capable of
operating at frequencies above 500 GHz -- 500 billion cycles per second
-- by cryogenically "freezing" the chip to 451 degrees below zero
Fahrenheit (4.5 Kelvins). Such extremely cold temperatures are found
naturally only in outer space, but can be artificially achieved on
Earth using ultra-cold materials such as liquid helium. (Absolute Zero,
the coldest possible temperature in nature, occurs at minus 459.67
degrees Fahrenheit).


Just a comment [sorry for the OT but has to be said].

Getting a small sample of transistors working is NOTHING like mass
producing them.

When IBM can put 250 million of them on a die, make 60K working chips a
month and do it for less than $250,000 per processor ... let me know
:-)

Tom

Jun 21 '06 #3

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In article <11**********************@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups .com>,
Tom St Denis <to********@gmail.com> wrote:
Getting a small sample of transistors working is NOTHING like mass
producing them. When IBM can put 250 million of them on a die, make 60K working chips a
month and do it for less than $250,000 per processor ... let me know
:-)


Yeah, but AMD would sell the same thing for $249750 and AMD's would
use 10% less power. And Oh yes, AMD's would be overclockable to
517 GHz.... but it would use a different socket. ;-)
--
Is there any thing whereof it may be said, See, this is new? It hath
been already of old time, which was before us. -- Ecclesiastes
Jun 21 '06 #4

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Walter Roberson wrote:
In article <11**********************@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups .com>,
Tom St Denis <to********@gmail.com> wrote:
Getting a small sample of transistors working is NOTHING like mass
producing them.

When IBM can put 250 million of them on a die, make 60K working chips a
month and do it for less than $250,000 per processor ... let me know
:-)


Yeah, but AMD would sell the same thing for $249750 and AMD's would
use 10% less power. And Oh yes, AMD's would be overclockable to
517 GHz.... but it would use a different socket. ;-)


Are you trying to say something?

Tom

Jun 21 '06 #5

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jjf

v4vijayakumar wrote:
IBM and Georgia Tech Break Silicon Speed Record

... 451 degrees below zero Fahrenheit (4.5 Kelvins).
Such extremely cold temperatures are found
naturally only in outer space, but can be artificially achieved on
Earth using ultra-cold materials such as liquid helium.
So that's how you get things down to 4.5 Kelvins, just get out your jug
of liquid Helium and stick them in it. Why didn't I think of that?
http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pr...ease/19843.wss
http://www-03.ibm.com/developerworks...d_you_get_some


Jun 22 '06 #6

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v4vijayakumar posted:
Such extremely cold temperatures are
found naturally only in outer space, but can be artificially achieved
on Earth using ultra-cold materials such as liquid helium.

A particular sample of helium may be ultra-cold... but it's just plain
wrong to describe an actual substance itself as being ultra-cold.
Give me enough pressure and I'll give you liquid helium at 500 kelvin.
Jun 22 '06 #7

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jj*@bcs.org.uk said:

v4vijayakumar wrote:
IBM and Georgia Tech Break Silicon Speed Record

... 451 degrees below zero Fahrenheit (4.5 Kelvins).
Such extremely cold temperatures are found
naturally only in outer space, but can be artificially achieved on
Earth using ultra-cold materials such as liquid helium.


So that's how you get things down to 4.5 Kelvins, just get out your jug
of liquid Helium and stick them in it. Why didn't I think of that?


But remember to put it back in the fridge when you're done.

(Well, because it's what keeps everything cold, of course! How did you
/think/ your fridge worked?)

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
Jun 22 '06 #8

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Frederick Gotham <fg*******@SPAM.com> wrote:
v4vijayakumar posted:
Such extremely cold temperatures are
found naturally only in outer space, but can be artificially achieved
on Earth using ultra-cold materials such as liquid helium.


A particular sample of helium may be ultra-cold... but it's just plain
wrong to describe an actual substance itself as being ultra-cold.

Give me enough pressure and I'll give you liquid helium at 500 kelvin.


You most certainly will not. The critical temperature of Helium is
5.2 kelvin. No amount of pressure will make it a liquid above that
temperature.

Xho

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Jun 22 '06 #9

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Frederick Gotham wrote:
.... snip ...
A particular sample of helium may be ultra-cold... but it's just plain
wrong to describe an actual substance itself as being ultra-cold.

Give me enough pressure and I'll give you liquid helium at 500 kelvin.


I doubt it. Look up "triple-point".

--
"I don't know where bin Laden is. I have no idea and really
don't care. It's not that important." - G.W. Bush, 2002-03-13
"No, we've had no evidence that Saddam Hussein was involved
with September the 11th." - George Walker Bush 2003-09-17

Jun 22 '06 #10

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