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Reference

P: n/a
I would like to know which book should refer for C/C++?(i have a basic
knowledge of C/C++ it doesn't matter if it is tough to undestand but
must be a complete reference).
Also which book to refer for DS in C++?

Jun 15 '06 #1
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fireangel schrieb:
I would like to know which book should refer for C/C++?(i have a basic
knowledge of C/C++ it doesn't matter if it is tough to undestand but
must be a complete reference).
As C and C++ are two separate languages, get yourself at least
one decent reference book for each of them if you really want
to write "mixed code". Otherwise, decide which of the two languages
you want to restrict yourself to.

C reference: Harbison&Steele, "C: A Reference Manual" usually gets
good marks as a reference book.

This newsgroup deals only with C; ask in comp.lang.c++ for a C++
reference book. The C++ FAQ at parashift.com may help you, too.

Also which book to refer for DS in C++?


Do not assume that anyone knows the same acronyms as you do if they
are not germane to the newsgroup's topic.
I assume you are neither referring to French car design classics nor
to a computer game.
Write it out when asking in comp.lang.c++.
Cheers
Michael
--
E-Mail: Mine is an /at/ gmx /dot/ de address.
Jun 15 '06 #2

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fireangel wrote:
I would like to know which book should refer for C/C++?(i have a basic
knowledge of C/C++ it doesn't matter if it is tough to undestand but
must be a complete reference).
I don't know of a reference on C/C++. Is there such a language? FWIW,
here in comp.lang.c we discuss the practical aspects of the C
programming language. AFAWCT, there is not such language as "C/C++",
other than in the minds of the marketing droids who write the copy on
the boxes that some software comes in.

If you are asking for a reference on the C programming language, I can
think of several.

First off, you can try the ISO standards manual, which can be bought
from the ISO website. Alternatively, your country's standards body
probably uses the same standard as ISO (ANSI and the CSA do), so you
likely can get a copy from them as well. Finally, there are PDF versions
of the draft of the last standard freely available from various sites on
the internet (a google search should pull them up for you). The draft is
a bit 'off' wrt the standard, but is close enough for most things.

Next, the classic book is "The C Programming Language" by Kernighan and
Ritchie. Available in any good bookstore, but it only goes up to the C89
standard (K&R don't seem too anxious to reissue it for the C99 standard).

Finally, you can pick up a copy of "C Unleashed" (by various members of
clc and more) in most fine bookstores. Highly recommended by many
posters in clc.
Also which book to refer for DS in C++?


This is not the correct forum to ask about C++. You want comp.lang.c++,
which is down the hall, second door on the right, just past the fire
extinguisher.

- --

Lew Pitcher, IT Specialist, Corporate Technology Solutions,
Enterprise Technology Solutions, TD Bank Financial Group

(Opinions expressed here are my own, not my employer's)
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Jun 15 '06 #3

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fireangel wrote:
I would like to know which book should refer for C/C++?(i have a basic
knowledge of C/C++ it doesn't matter if it is tough to undestand but
must be a complete reference).
Also which book to refer for DS in C++?


I used to be a big fan of Herbert Schildt's _C++: The Complete
Reference_ (probably still would be, only I don't bother with C++
anymore).

Jun 15 '06 #4

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"pa*****@gmail.com" <pa*****@gmail.com> writes:
fireangel wrote:
I would like to know which book should refer for C/C++?(i have a basic
knowledge of C/C++ it doesn't matter if it is tough to undestand but
must be a complete reference).
Also which book to refer for DS in C++?


I used to be a big fan of Herbert Schildt's _C++: The Complete
Reference_ (probably still would be, only I don't bother with C++
anymore).


C++ is, of course, off-topic here.

Any book by Herbert Schildt should be avoided. The general consensus
is that he's a skilled writer with an engaging style who doesn't really
know what he's talking about; he's therefore extremely effective at
propagating misinformation. See Clive Feather's review of his _The
Annotated ANSI C Standard_ at <http://www.quut.com/c/schildt.html>,
and Peter Seebach's review of his _C: The Complete Reference_ at
<http://herd.plethora.net/~seebs/c/c_tcr.html>.

(Rumor says Schildt has improved since then, but not enough.)

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
Jun 16 '06 #5

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Keith Thompson wrote:
Any book by Herbert Schildt should be avoided. The general consensus
is that he's a skilled writer with an engaging style who doesn't really
know what he's talking about;


That does appear to be the case. I guess I'm lucky that I turned out
alright (I did, didn't I...?).

Jun 19 '06 #6

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