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Introduce urself

P: n/a
Hi friends

how about introducing urself ?

i m Nikesh from India

May 15 '06 #1
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43 Replies


P: n/a
Hello Nikesh,

I come from China. ^_^

May 15 '06 #2

P: n/a

<zh**********@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@j73g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
Hello Nikesh,

I come from China. ^_^

Now that you found friendship, kindly bugger off. joe
May 15 '06 #3

P: n/a
In article <11*********************@i39g2000cwa.googlegroups. com>,
Nikesh <ni****@gmail.com> wrote:
how about introducing urself ?


The concept of an "ur self" sound more appropriate to a
psychology newsgroup. Is it perhaps the same as the id?

-- Richard
May 15 '06 #4

P: n/a
Nikesh wrote:
Hi friends

how about introducing urself ?

i m Nikesh from India


This is not a teen chat board. This is a Usenet group and it's topic is
the C language conforming to it's international standard. If you have
question regarding standard C, by all means post here. Also be sure to
read the information at the following URLs to elicit a better response
in the group.

<http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
<http://clc-wiki.net/wiki/Introduction_to_comp.lang.c>
<http://www.safalra.com/special/googlegroupsreply/>
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USENET>
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netiquette>

May 15 '06 #5

P: n/a
Nikesh wrote:
Hi friends

how about introducing urself ?

i m Nikesh from India


I don't care what your name is, your age and where you're from... At
least you could write what you do for living and how it's connected with
programming in C, if you want to be any "mr. Nice-guy" and be a just
slightly a bit more on-topic than you're now.

But I guess you're just a young confused lazy teenager who thinks usenet
is one big teen-chat-room ('urself'). I'm really tired of those idiotic
teenage abbreviations.
Best regards / Med venlig hilsen
Martin Jørgensen

--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Home of Martin Jørgensen - http://www.martinjoergensen.dk
May 15 '06 #6

P: n/a
U have no communication skills u know

well every new thing starts from introduction

U may be tired of introducing ur self but it is very important in start
of something

Just think about it Martin

Well i m possessing good knowledge in C and constatnly improving it.

All the best

May 15 '06 #7

P: n/a
Nikesh wrote:
U have no communication skills u know


Ow, this made my head hurt.


Brian
--
Please quote enough of the previous message for context. To do so from
Google, click "show options" and use the Reply shown in the expanded
header.
May 15 '06 #8

P: n/a
Nikesh wrote:
U have no communication skills u know

I don't think we have a U posting here.

--
Ian Collins.
May 15 '06 #9

P: n/a

Ian Collins wrote:
Nikesh wrote:
U have no communication skills u know
I don't think we have a U posting here.


Two guys were standing on a wharf in Naples when they
see a submarine sail by.

One turns to the other and asks: Is that a U-boat?

To which the other replies: No, that's notta my boat.

--
Ian Collins.


May 15 '06 #10

P: n/a
Nikesh wrote:

U have no communication skills u know

well every new thing starts from introduction

U may be tired of introducing ur self but it is very important in
start of something

Just think about it Martin

Well i m possessing good knowledge in C and constatnly improving it.

All the best


Why are you showing none of the spelling abilities of my grandson
in kindergarten? He can communicate much better than you can. He
correctly spells the words he knows, or at least asks the adults
how to spell them. This is the sort of thing that makes
communication easy. Imbecelic childish abbreviations make
communication hard.

In this particular case it doesn't matter too much, but in general
on usenet you should realize that readers may very well not have
convenient access to previous articles in a thread. That means
that your reply articles should include adequate context, so that
they stand by themselves. Google is NOT usenet, it is only a very
poor interface to the real usenet system. To include proper
context when using google, see my sig. below. Please be sure to
read the referenced URLs.

--
"If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
"show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
"Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson
More details at: <http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
Also see <http://www.safalra.com/special/googlegroupsreply/>

May 16 '06 #11

P: n/a
In article <11**********************@i40g2000cwc.googlegroups .com> "Nikesh" <ni****@gmail.com> writes:
U have no communication skills u know
I have no idea what you are replying to. Who is "U"? Not everyone is using
the crappy google interface to Usenet you are using.
well every new thing starts from introduction
What new thing? This newsgroup exists already over 20 years. And even when
it started, nobody introduced him/herself. Even at that time I did not
introduce myself, I just went in.
U may be tired of introducing ur self but it is very important in start
of something
If I had to introduce myself to everybody that came into this newsgroup, I
would not have bothered after about 1000 introductions.
Just think about it Martin
Yes, think about it. Martin (if you mean Martin Jørgensen) gave much
better information about himself than you do. With his information you
can even determine what he is doing at this moment. Something that is
surely lacking from your "introduction".
Well i m possessing good knowledge in C and constatnly improving it.


You say so. I even do not know what your surname is, where you are
working, and so on. All that information can be found about Martin
Jørgensen. So, who are you, except from "Nikesh who is possessing
good knowledge in C and constantly improving it"? Except that you are
from India (the use of "u" is a dead giveaway). (And "urself" has some
strange philosophical connotations I will not even talk about.)
--
dik t. winter, cwi, kruislaan 413, 1098 sj amsterdam, nederland, +31205924131
home: bovenover 215, 1025 jn amsterdam, nederland; http://www.cwi.nl/~dik/
May 16 '06 #12

P: n/a
Dik T. Winter posted:
Except that you are from India (the use of "u" is a dead giveaway).

How does his use of "u" suggest that he's from India?

(I'm genuinely curious, not being sarcastic).

-Tomás
May 16 '06 #13

P: n/a
Tomás wrote:

Dik T. Winter posted:
Except that you are from India (the use of "u" is a dead giveaway).


How does his use of "u" suggest that he's from India?

(I'm genuinely curious, not being sarcastic).


A lot of Indians do it.
They don't all do it, and everyone that does it isn't Indian.

The real dead giveaway,
is when a poster uses the word "doubts"
where the word "questions" would seem more natural.

--
pete
May 16 '06 #14

P: n/a
"Nikesh" <ni****@gmail.com> writes:
U have no communication skills u know
It's spelled "You", not "U". Silly abbreviations like "u" for "you"
and "ur" for "your" may be acceptable in some forums; this is not one
of them. Please take the time to spell out words so that others can
read what you write.
well every new thing starts from introduction
This is not a "new thing". This is a newsgroup that has existed for
about a quarter of a century. I can appreciate your desire to be
friendly, but this isn't a chat room.

[...]
Well i m possessing good knowledge in C and constatnly improving it.


Good for you. Demonstrate it by discussing C. That's what this
newsgroup is for.

And while you're at it, *please* read <http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
and <http://clc-wiki.net/wiki/Introduction_to_comp.lang.c>. The FAQ
is another good reasource: <http://www.c-faq.com/>.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
May 16 '06 #15

P: n/a
pete wrote:
Tomás wrote:
Dik T. Winter posted:

Except that you are from India (the use of "u" is a dead giveaway).


How does his use of "u" suggest that he's from India?

(I'm genuinely curious, not being sarcastic).

A lot of Indians do it.


I guess they learn to use "u" instead of "you" in their schools...
Best regards / Med venlig hilsen
Martin Jørgensen

--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Home of Martin Jørgensen - http://www.martinjoergensen.dk
May 16 '06 #16

P: n/a

Martin Jørgensen wrote:
pete wrote:
Tomás wrote:
Dik T. Winter posted:
Except that you are from India (the use of "u" is a dead giveaway).

How does his use of "u" suggest that he's from India?

(I'm genuinely curious, not being sarcastic).

A lot of Indians do it.


I guess they learn to use "u" instead of "you" in their schools...


No, Martin they (or I could say we) do not learn it in schools. The
faculty has better things to teach like Algebra, English Grammar,
Science et al in schools. The usage of u, ur is all due to the SMS
culture which should not be used in usenet. Apologies for that.

May 16 '06 #17

P: n/a
Martin Jørgensen wrote:

pete wrote:
Tomás wrote:
Dik T. Winter posted:
Except that you are from India (the use of "u" is a dead giveaway).

How does his use of "u" suggest that he's from India?

(I'm genuinely curious, not being sarcastic).

A lot of Indians do it.


I guess they learn to use "u" instead of "you" in their schools...


There was a long thread about it, a long time ago.

http://groups.google.com/group/comp....0f407bd90d265c

"this slang we have learnt from westerners
while we communicate with them"

--
pete
May 16 '06 #18

P: n/a
Nikesh wrote:
U have no communication skills u know

well every new thing starts from introduction

U may be tired of introducing ur self but it is very important in start
of something

Just think about it Martin

Well i m possessing good knowledge in C and constatnly improving it.


Look, nobody here cares *who* you are or *where* your are from. As I
explained earlier, this is an Usenet group devoted to ISO C. If you
have a question in that regard, by all means do post it here. However
this group is not like many of the web forums on C/C++, with warm
introductions, nostalgic reminiscences and long-winded off-topic
digressions. As I understand it, from it's start, this group has been a
strictly topic-centered, technical place.

For more information, please be sure to check out the URLs in my
previous post to you. Unless you happen to have a fetish for it, you
won't be gaining much by repeatedly cutting a fool of yourself here.

May 16 '06 #19

P: n/a
Martin Jørgensen wrote:
pete wrote:
Tomás wrote:
Dik T. Winter posted:
Except that you are from India (the use of "u" is a dead giveaway).

How does his use of "u" suggest that he's from India?

(I'm genuinely curious, not being sarcastic).

A lot of Indians do it.


I guess they learn to use "u" instead of "you" in their schools...


Certainly not. Even the worst school won't do that. The culprit here is
the Cell phone and the associated SMS popularised by films and music
channels on TV.

May 16 '06 #20

P: n/a

Nikesh wrote:
Hi friends

how about introducing urself ?

i m Nikesh from India


Is it a "Me too!" post.

I saw first "me to" post
[http://groups.google.com/groups?selm=bnews.csu-cs.1997] in google 20
Year Usenet Timeline.

May 16 '06 #21

P: n/a
v4vijayakumar said:

Nikesh wrote:
Hi friends

how about introducing urself ?

i m Nikesh from India


Is it a "Me too!" post.


Could you guys pipe down, please? This newsgroup is supposed to be about C.
--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
May 16 '06 #22

P: n/a

CBFalconer wrote:
Nikesh wrote: <something with no context> <snip>
In this particular case it doesn't matter too much, but in general
on usenet you should realize that readers may very well not have
convenient access to previous articles in a thread. That means
that your reply articles should include adequate context, so that
they stand by themselves. Google is NOT usenet, it is only a very
poor interface to the real usenet system. To include proper
context when using google, see my sig. below. Please be sure to
read the referenced URLs.


It's not just people with proper newsreaders that get annoyed when
people don't give context. Even on Google, I find it hard to tell who a
poster is replying to when there is no context in a post (messages
often cross on Usenet, so it isn't necessarily the poster immediately
above them in the archives), and I don't want to have to go back to
read the start of a thread to find out what it's about (which isn't
always on the same Web page, or even the same NG). Although most of the
contextless posts on Usenet are due to Google users, that doesn't mean
that Google users can automatically tell who they're replying to.
(For instance, if I hadn't given context above, it would take me
several minutes using Google as a newsreader to determine that this
message was in reply to CBFalconer's, whereas I have seen newsreaders
which could do it in milliseconds.)

May 16 '06 #23

P: n/a
On 2006-05-16, CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.com> wrote:
Nikesh wrote:

U have no communication skills u know

well every new thing starts from introduction

U may be tired of introducing ur self but it is very important in
start of something

Just think about it Martin

Well i m possessing good knowledge in C and constatnly improving it.

All the best


Why are you showing none of the spelling abilities of my grandson
in kindergarten? He can communicate much better than you can. He
correctly spells the words he knows, or at least asks the adults
how to spell them. This is the sort of thing that makes
communication easy. Imbecelic childish abbreviations make
communication hard.


Imbecelic? (Sorry but I couldn't resist...)
May 16 '06 #24

P: n/a
Ben C wrote:
On 2006-05-16, CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.com> wrote:

.... snip ...

Why are you showing none of the spelling abilities of my grandson
in kindergarten? He can communicate much better than you can. He
correctly spells the words he knows, or at least asks the adults
how to spell them. This is the sort of thing that makes
communication easy. Imbecelic childish abbreviations make
communication hard.


Imbecelic? (Sorry but I couldn't resist...)


Use of the wrong middle finger. :-)

--
"If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
"show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
"Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson
More details at: <http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
Also see <http://www.safalra.com/special/googlegroupsreply/>
May 16 '06 #25

P: n/a
In article <SB******************@news.indigo.ie> "Tomás" <NU**@NULL.NULL> writes:
Dik T. Winter posted:
Except that you are from India (the use of "u" is a dead giveaway).

How does his use of "u" suggest that he's from India?

(I'm genuinely curious, not being sarcastic).


It comes from SMS or TEXT (as the Brits call it: TEXT your message to
4131...). As it is English shorthand, and in the US SMS is not used as
much as in other parts of the world, it is most likely that it comes
from an English speaking country in some other part of the world. I
never have seen a Brit use that shorthand. So there is not much that
remains.
--
dik t. winter, cwi, kruislaan 413, 1098 sj amsterdam, nederland, +31205924131
home: bovenover 215, 1025 jn amsterdam, nederland; http://www.cwi.nl/~dik/
May 16 '06 #26

P: n/a
In article <Iz********@cwi.nl>, Dik T. Winter <Di********@cwi.nl> wrote:
It comes from SMS or TEXT (as the Brits call it: TEXT your message to


That's "Briton", not "Brit". Please don't use these slang
abbreviations on Usenet.

-- Richard
May 16 '06 #27

P: n/a
Richard Tobin said:
In article <Iz********@cwi.nl>, Dik T. Winter <Di********@cwi.nl> wrote:
It comes from SMS or TEXT (as the Brits call it: TEXT your message to


That's "Briton", not "Brit". Please don't use these slang
abbreviations on Usenet.


That's "abbrevs", not "abbreviations".

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
May 16 '06 #28

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield wrote:

Richard Tobin said:
In article <Iz********@cwi.nl>,
Dik T. Winter <Di********@cwi.nl> wrote:
It comes from SMS or TEXT
(as the Brits call it: TEXT your message to


That's "Briton", not "Brit". Please don't use these slang
abbreviations on Usenet.


That's "abbrevs", not "abbreviations".


I would think that you would prefer "Pomms"
to the fully spelled out version.

--
pete
May 16 '06 #29

P: n/a
Martin Jørgensen wrote:
pete wrote:
Tomás wrote:
Dik T. Winter posted:
Except that you are from India (the use of "u" is a dead giveaway).

How does his use of "u" suggest that he's from India?

(I'm genuinely curious, not being sarcastic).

A lot of Indians do it.


I guess they learn to use "u" instead of "you" in their schools...

Now, why would you assume that? This usage is 100% English slang
created by recent English-speaking users of IRC and SMS.

Eventually people grow out of childish things like this, or use it in a
more appropriate manner.
May 16 '06 #30

P: n/a
Clever Monkey wrote:
Martin Jørgensen wrote:
pete wrote:
Tomás wrote:

Dik T. Winter posted:
> Except that you are from India (the use of "u" is a dead giveaway).

How does his use of "u" suggest that he's from India?

(I'm genuinely curious, not being sarcastic).
A lot of Indians do it.


I guess they learn to use "u" instead of "you" in their schools...

Now, why would you assume that? This usage is 100% English slang
created by recent English-speaking users of IRC and SMS.

Eventually people grow out of childish things like this, or use it in a
more appropriate manner.


One should also point out that people have been doing this sort of thing
for decades. The more restricted the interface is, the more this sort
of thing happens. A prime example is Morse code, which has many
abbreviations and numerical codes to communicate location, marital
status, communication status and the like -- all those things that
people want to talk about when chatting over a constrained link.

No excuse for USENET, however. Unless you have to type with a stick
held in your teeth, there is no excuse for not trying to form coherent
sentences in whatever language is appropriate and comfortable.
May 16 '06 #31

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield wrote:
v4vijayakumar said:
Nikesh wrote:
Hi friends

how about introducing urself ?

i m Nikesh from India

Is it a "Me too!" post.


Could you guys pipe down, please? This newsgroup is supposed to be about C.

Well, given the majority of the postings recently have been poor
attempts at catching up people with "puzzles" or blatant homework
assignments, the diversion into philosophy is not a complete loss.

But I agree in principle that not only have we beaten this thread to
absolute death, it has got a little out of hand.
May 16 '06 #32

P: n/a
Clever Monkey <cl**************@hotmail.com.invalid> writes:
Martin Jxrgensen wrote:
I guess they learn to use "u" instead of "you" in their schools...

Now, why would you assume that? This usage is 100% English slang
created by recent English-speaking users of IRC and SMS.


I saw this kind of thing in use on local bulletin board systems
long before I'd ever heard of IRC or the Internet.
--
"Given that computing power increases exponentially with time,
algorithms with exponential or better O-notations
are actually linear with a large constant."
--Mike Lee
May 16 '06 #33

P: n/a
Richard Heathfield wrote:
Richard Tobin said:

In article <Iz********@cwi.nl>, Dik T. Winter <Di********@cwi.nl> wrote:
It comes from SMS or TEXT (as the Brits call it: TEXT your message to


That's "Briton", not "Brit". Please don't use these slang
abbreviations on Usenet.

That's "abbrevs", not "abbreviations".


OMFG!!! How just about "abs" ??? Please don't use those f*cking *ABS* on
usenet? Or better yet: STOP USING THOSE A.'S ON USENET...
Best regards / Med venlig hilsen
Martin Jørgensen

--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Home of Martin Jørgensen - http://www.martinjoergensen.dk
May 16 '06 #34

P: n/a
On 2006-05-16, Martin Jørgensen <un*********@spam.jay.net> wrote:
Richard Heathfield wrote:
Richard Tobin said:

In article <Iz********@cwi.nl>, Dik T. Winter <Di********@cwi.nl> wrote:

It comes from SMS or TEXT (as the Brits call it: TEXT your message to

That's "Briton", not "Brit". Please don't use these slang
abbreviations on Usenet.

That's "abbrevs", not "abbreviations".


OMFG!!! How just about "abs" ??? Please don't use those f*cking *ABS* on
usenet? Or better yet: STOP USING THOSE A.'S ON USENET...


We should import AFU's BOA.
Best regards / Med venlig hilsen
Martin Jørgensen

May 16 '06 #35

P: n/a
Clever Monkey wrote:
Richard Heathfield wrote:
v4vijayakumar said:
Nikesh wrote:

how about introducing urself ?

i m Nikesh from India
Is it a "Me too!" post.


Could you guys pipe down, please? This newsgroup is supposed to
be about C.


Well, given the majority of the postings recently have been poor
attempts at catching up people with "puzzles" or blatant homework
assignments, the diversion into philosophy is not a complete loss.

But I agree in principle that not only have we beaten this thread
to absolute death, it has got a little out of hand.


Just to control any further urges to contribute, PLONK thread.

--
"If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
"show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
"Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson
More details at: <http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
Also see <http://www.safalra.com/special/googlegroupsreply/>
May 16 '06 #36

P: n/a
Martin Jørgensen said:
How just about "abs" ???


See? I knew we'd get back on topic eventually.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
May 16 '06 #37

P: n/a
"Jordan Abel" wrote:
On 2006-05-16, Martin Jørgensen <un*********@spam.jay.net> wrote:
Richard Heathfield wrote:
Richard Tobin said:
In article <Iz********@cwi.nl>, Dik T. Winter <Di********@cwi.nl>
wrote:

>It comes from SMS or TEXT (as the Brits call it: TEXT your
>message to

That's "Briton", not "Brit". Please don't use these slang
abbreviations on Usenet.
That's "abbrevs", not "abbreviations".


OMFG!!! How just about "abs" ??? Please don't use those f*cking
*ABS* on
usenet? Or better yet: STOP USING THOSE A.'S ON USENET...


We should import AFU's BOA.


WT* is AFU's BOA? :-)

I'm a dedicated member (DM) of the AAA (Association Against
Abbreviations).

--
John, DM@AAA
May 16 '06 #38

P: n/a
On 2006-05-16, John F <sp**@127.0.0.1> wrote:
"Jordan Abel" wrote:
On 2006-05-16, Martin Jørgensen <un*********@spam.jay.net> wrote:
Richard Heathfield wrote:
Richard Tobin said:
>In article <Iz********@cwi.nl>, Dik T. Winter <Di********@cwi.nl>
>wrote:
>
>>It comes from SMS or TEXT (as the Brits call it: TEXT your
>>message to
>
>That's "Briton", not "Brit". Please don't use these slang
>abbreviations on Usenet.
That's "abbrevs", not "abbreviations".

OMFG!!! How just about "abs" ??? Please don't use those f*cking
*ABS* on
usenet? Or better yet: STOP USING THOSE A.'S ON USENET...
We should import AFU's BOA.


WT* is AFU's BOA? :-)


AFU = alt.folklore.urban

And the BOA is a rather tongue-in-cheek 'ban on acronyms' (or
abbreviations, depending on who you ask)
I'm a dedicated member (DM) of the AAA (Association Against
Abbreviations).

--
John, DM@AAA

May 16 '06 #39

P: n/a
Jordan Abel wrote:
On 2006-05-16, John F <sp**@127.0.0.1> wrote:
"Jordan Abel" wrote:
On 2006-05-16, Martin Jørgensen <un*********@spam.jay.net> wrote:
Richard Heathfield wrote:
> Richard Tobin said:
>> Dik T. Winter <Di********@cwi.nl> wrote:
>>
>>> It comes from SMS or TEXT (as the Brits call it: TEXT your
>>> message to
>>
>> That's "Briton", not "Brit". Please don't use these slang
>> abbreviations on Usenet.
>
>
> That's "abbrevs", not "abbreviations".

OMFG!!! How just about "abs" ??? Please don't use those f*cking
*ABS* on
usenet? Or better yet: STOP USING THOSE A.'S ON USENET...

We should import AFU's BOA.


WT* is AFU's BOA? :-)


AFU = alt.folklore.urban

And the BOA is a rather tongue-in-cheek 'ban on acronyms' (or
abbreviations, depending on who you ask)


I never wanted to check out the _exact_ difference between abb. and
acr. (D'oh!)

Thanks for clarifying that!
I'm a dedicated member (DM) of the AAA (Association Against
Abbreviations).


--
John ... still DM at the AAA :-)
May 16 '06 #40

P: n/a
In article <44***********@mindspring.com> pf*****@mindspring.com writes:
Richard Heathfield wrote:

Richard Tobin said:
In article <Iz********@cwi.nl>,
Dik T. Winter <Di********@cwi.nl> wrote:
>It comes from SMS or TEXT
>(as the Brits call it: TEXT your message to

That's "Briton", not "Brit". Please don't use these slang
abbreviations on Usenet.


That's "abbrevs", not "abbreviations".


I would think that you would prefer "Pomms"
to the fully spelled out version.


No, it also includes Taffs and Jocks.
--
dik t. winter, cwi, kruislaan 413, 1098 sj amsterdam, nederland, +31205924131
home: bovenover 215, 1025 jn amsterdam, nederland; http://www.cwi.nl/~dik/
May 17 '06 #41

P: n/a
Jordan Abel wrote:
On 2006-05-16, John F <sp**@127.0.0.1> wrote:
"Jordan Abel" wrote:
We should import AFU's BOA.


WT* is AFU's BOA? :-)


AFU = alt.folklore.urban

And the BOA is a rather tongue-in-cheek 'ban on acronyms' (or
abbreviations, depending on who you ask)


It's a ban on acronyms that haven't been pre-approved by the group. I
haven't read the group in a while, but it sometimes got rather silly,
like frowning on "FBI".

Brian
May 17 '06 #42

P: n/a
Default User wrote:
Jordan Abel wrote:
On 2006-05-16, John F <sp**@127.0.0.1> wrote:
"Jordan Abel" wrote: We should import AFU's BOA.
WT* is AFU's BOA? :-)


AFU = alt.folklore.urban

And the BOA is a rather tongue-in-cheek 'ban on acronyms' (or
abbreviations, depending on who you ask)


It's a ban on acronyms that haven't been pre-approved by the group.
I
haven't read the group in a while, but it sometimes got rather
silly,
like frowning on "FBI".


Federal Basket Industry?

scnr (sorry, could not resist...)
--
John
May 17 '06 #43

P: n/a
Dik T. Winter wrote:

In article <44***********@mindspring.com> pf*****@mindspring.com writes:
> Richard Heathfield wrote:
> >
> > Richard Tobin said:
> >
> > > In article <Iz********@cwi.nl>,
> > > Dik T. Winter <Di********@cwi.nl> wrote:
> > >>It comes from SMS or TEXT
> > >>(as the Brits call it: TEXT your message to
> > >
> > > That's "Briton", not "Brit". Please don't use these slang
> > > abbreviations on Usenet.
> >
> > That's "abbrevs", not "abbreviations".

>
> I would think that you would prefer "Pomms"
> to the fully spelled out version.


No, it also includes Taffs and Jocks.


But, so does "Briton" or "Brit"

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/briton

--
pete
May 17 '06 #44

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