By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
425,696 Members | 2,182 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 425,696 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

What you can't find in the programing text books

P: n/a
What you can't find in programing text books

Professional software development needs more knowledge than language
syntax,
OOP, styles, etc. There are many things which people usually learn by
working in
industry. One important part of the development is good knowledge of
tools
such as compilers, linkers, and make file design. There are no in-dept
discussion of these tools in C/C++ programming text books. I haven't
seen
good books which covers these topics. They usually refer to tools
manuals;
the problem with manuals such as compiler manuals, is that they talk
about
'how to do things' not 'what', 'when' and why to do or not to do. You
should have some knowledge of the principles before referring to
manuals and references.
I'm wondering if any body knows good tutorial style books about
development tools
such as compilers, linkers, profilers, etc. which covers topics such
as:

-Compilers and linkers options, their meanings, how/when/why to use
them
-comparison between different open-source tools, compilers, linkers,
how to choose them;
-how to convert make/project files in one tools/platform to another
-how to detect memory leak using profilers
-what's pre-compiled header files, why/how to use/not to use them

I know that you can find these information here and there online if you
spend
so much time searching online, but I prefer well-written books; and
online
information if they are in pdf format, which I can print and read off
line.

If you know such books, or have any comments please post a message
here.

Thanks.

John

Apr 8 '06 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
2 Replies


P: n/a
youpak2000 wrote:
What you can't find in programing text books

Professional software development needs more knowledge than language
syntax,
OOP, styles, etc.
Uh, it also needs better systems to match humans to books. This should be
like a dating service (and would probably work better than one). For
example, if you don't happen to have a good Barnes & Noble in your area,
you'd have to rely on the Internet to even learn of the book /Design
Patterns/. The smaller bookstores won't sell it, and the online book stores
will lose it in a sea of vague alternatives.
There are many things which people usually learn by
working in
industry. One important part of the development is good knowledge of
tools
such as compilers, linkers, and make file design. There are no in-dept
discussion of these tools in C/C++ programming text books.
Good, because they are not generic or portable, like the good C++ text
books. You compare apples and oranges here, and a good C++ book should not
waste the majority of its readers' times by describing the author's favorite
Makefile.
I haven't
seen
good books which covers these topics.
Is it possible you have never ever seen an O'Reilly book, with a Dover
clip-art of some critter on the cover?
They usually refer to tools
manuals;
That's another problem. Plenty of books are just the users manual printed
out.
-Compilers and linkers options, their meanings, how/when/why to use
them
http://www.google.com/search?q=wrox+vcspawn

The first hit revealed a discussion group for WROX's /Beginning VC++ 6/.
-comparison between different open-source tools, compilers, linkers,
how to choose them;
That's where O'Reilly lives.
-how to convert make/project files in one tools/platform to another
The community around cmake, autoconf, etc. will know the books and web sites
here.
-how to detect memory leak using profilers
The best options there are Bjarne's Addison Wesley series - the red books
that describe how not to f--- up C++. They describe how to prevent leaks.

The next best bet is the web sites supporting tools like Purify or Valgrind.
Sad but true; I don't think anyone's writing books about these things.
-what's pre-compiled header files, why/how to use/not to use them


Now the problem is that these topics can't fill a balanced book. And our
industry only exists in its present form via the internet. Without its Giant
Book From Hell, tools like Linux would never have taken off, because even
the most ardent early adopters could never have figured out how to compile
and install the stinkin' thing.

Some publishers specialize in the philosophical side. That's high risk,
because the pragmatic side is so volatile. Here's a list of books from a
publisher who concentrates here:

http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/bookshelf/index.html

Ship it!: A Practical Guide to Successful Software Projects
Data Crunching: Solve Everyday Problems using Java, Python, and more.

Pragmatic Version Control: Using Subversion

Programming Ruby: The Pragmatic Programmer's Guide, Second Edition

Pragmatic Project Automation: How to Build, Deploy, and Monitor Java
Applications
Now tell them we need the same thing for C++, and they will probably turn
one around very rapidly. Just like their books tell us to do with software
projects. ;-)

--
Phlip
http://www.greencheese.org/ZeekLand <-- NOT a blog!!!
Apr 8 '06 #2

P: n/a
yo********@yahoo.com wrote:
What you can't find in programing text books
Please correct the setting of your mailer so you don't produce such
annoying line wraps. They make you post very difficult to read.
Professional software development needs more knowledge than language
syntax,
OOP, styles, etc. There are many things which people usually learn by
working in
industry. One important part of the development is good knowledge of
tools
such as compilers, linkers, and make file design. There are no in-dept
discussion of these tools in C/C++ programming text books. I haven't
seen
good books which covers these topics. They usually refer to tools
manuals;
the problem with manuals such as compiler manuals, is that they talk
about
'how to do things' not 'what', 'when' and why to do or not to do. You
should have some knowledge of the principles before referring to
manuals and references.
I'm wondering if any body knows good tutorial style books about
development tools
such as compilers, linkers, profilers, etc. which covers topics such
as:

All you point are completely platform and tool specific. Most tools and
platforms I have used have excellent user guides explaining them. If
yours don't, swap to one that does.

--
Ian Collins.
Apr 8 '06 #3

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.