470,810 Members | 1,138 Online
Bytes | Developer Community
New Post

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Post your question to a community of 470,810 developers. It's quick & easy.

whats there in C that is not in C++ and VC++

hi, C is an evergreen programming language developed by denis richie.
C++ is only an extension to C with some extra added features and VC++
provides an IDE for programming. still C is not obselete. why? please
answer to make me a clear view about C.

Feb 7 '06 #1
17 1375
student wrote:
hi, C is an evergreen programming language developed by denis richie.
C++ is only an extension to C with some extra added features and VC++
provides an IDE for programming. still C is not obselete. why? please
answer to make me a clear view about C.


You cannot be serious!

Go back and check your facts before posting potentially inflamatory
questions. Hints:

- it's Brian W. Kernighan and Dennis M. Ritchie
- C++ is /not/ an extension, it's a /different/ programing language
- VC++ is not /just/ and IDE
- look up Bjarne Stroustrup (in connection with C++)

If you research this properly, you'll have your answer. To do that,
you'll have to learn a few things about both C and C++. Right now, you
obviously know nothing about either.

Also, be more careful with your spelling. I'm sure that dmr wouldn't
appreciate being "rebranded": it's Ritchie -- not Richie, it's Dennis
-- not Denis; and I don't even want to go into your not properly
capitalising people's names. BTW, sentences, in general, also begin
with a capital letter.

--
BR, Vladimir

Feb 7 '06 #2
Vladimir S. Oka wrote:
You cannot be serious!


And though I think the funniest part was the "evergreen" adjective.
Feb 7 '06 #3
"student" <bp*****@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@o13g2000cwo.googlegro ups.com...
hi, C is an evergreen programming language
C is a programming language. I have no idea what
you mean by 'evergreen'.
developed by denis richie.
Dennis Ritchie and Brian Kernighan.
(Note that the cover of their famous book
lists their name in the opposite order).
C++ is only an extension to C
Absolutely not correct. C++ is a *different* programming
language (whose design was indeed influenced by C)
with some extra added features
C++ adds *nothing* to C. It is a *different* language.
and VC++
provides an IDE for programming.
And much, much more.
still C is not obselete.
Of course not.
why?
The television receiver was invented after the radio receiver.
They use very similar technology. Yet radio is not obsolete.
Why?

They are similar, but *different* things, each more suitable for
a particular task.
please
answer to make me a clear view about C.


You can get a clear view of what C is and is not by
reading a good C textbook. I recommend the one authored
by the two gentlemen I mentioned above. Google can easily
find vendors.

I suggest you check your facts before forming conclusions
about them.

-Mike
Feb 7 '06 #4
On 2006-02-07, Mike Wahler <mk******@mkwahler.net> wrote:
"student" <bp*****@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@o13g2000cwo.googlegro ups.com...
hi, C is an evergreen programming language


C is a programming language. I have no idea what
you mean by 'evergreen'.
developed by denis richie.


Dennis Ritchie and Brian Kernighan.


The latter was involved, as far as i know, only in the production of
the book, not in the design of the language itself.
Feb 7 '06 #5

student wrote:
hi, C is an evergreen
Evergreen? Is that another way of saying "old"?
programming language developed by denis richie.
ITYM Dennis Ritchie.
C++ is only an extension to C with some extra added features
Uh, no. The bulk of C++ is derived from C, but there are fundamental
differences between the two languages. It's not just a matter of some
added features.
and VC++ provides an IDE for programming. still C is not obselete. why? please
answer to make me a clear view about C.


Same reason Fortran is still not obsolete; there are times when it's
still the best tool for the job.

Feb 7 '06 #6
Mike Wahler said:
"student" <bp*****@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@o13g2000cwo.googlegro ups.com...
hi, C is an evergreen programming language
C is a programming language. I have no idea what
you mean by 'evergreen'.
developed by denis richie.


Dennis Ritchie and Brian Kernighan.


I suggest you check your facts before forming conclusions about them.

<snip>
I suggest you check your facts before forming conclusions
about them.


Er, quite so. :-)
--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
Feb 7 '06 #7

"Richard Heathfield" <in*****@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
news:ds**********@nwrdmz01.dmz.ncs.ea.ibs-infra.bt.com...
Mike Wahler said:
"student" <bp*****@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@o13g2000cwo.googlegro ups.com...
hi, C is an evergreen programming language
C is a programming language. I have no idea what
you mean by 'evergreen'.
developed by denis richie.


Dennis Ritchie and Brian Kernighan.


I suggest you check your facts before forming conclusions about them.


Dang! Got my facts wrong. But fortunately I didn't
use them to form a conclusion. :-)

<snip>
I suggest you check your facts before forming conclusions
about them.


Er, quite so. :-)


I stand (actually, hiding under my desk) corrected. :-)

-Mike
Feb 7 '06 #8

"student" <bp*****@gmail.com> wrote
hi, C is an evergreen programming language developed by denis richie.
C++ is only an extension to C with some extra added features and VC++
provides an IDE for programming. still C is not obselete. why? please
answer to make me a clear view about C.

In mathematical terms, C++ is not a superset of C because there are some C
programs which are not legal C++ programs.
However for our purposes what you say is nearly true.

So the reason for not having the C++ extensions isn't purely technical. It
is psychological. It is a lot easier to write bad C++ programs than it is to
write bad C programs.

By rejecting the C++ extensions, at a stoke you make your job of writing an
understandable, efficient, and correct program that much simpler.
It is not always the case, of course. Some programs are easier to write in
C++, because the C++ extensions express the relationships between your data
items better than a purely procedural / simple data structure program can.

The British army recently ordered some rifles. They came with burst /
single shot modes. The army had them modifed to get rid of the automatic
fire option, reasoning that soldiers would, in the heat of battle, waste all
their ammunition. Having an option isn't always better.
Feb 7 '06 #9
Malcolm a écrit :
So the reason for not having the C++ extensions isn't purely technical. It
is psychological. It is a lot easier to write bad C++ programs than it is to
write bad C programs.


I doubt that.
As in C++, you shouldn't do memory management (at least for containers),
it is less likely that you will run into buffer overflow issues.
Feb 7 '06 #10
Malcolm wrote:

The British army recently ordered some rifles. They came with burst /
single shot modes. The army had them modifed to get rid of the automatic
fire option, reasoning that soldiers would, in the heat of battle, waste all
their ammunition. Having an option isn't always better.


If you wish to play on that analogy, when they came to replace that
vererable rifle, they put the the option back.

--
Ian Collins.
Feb 7 '06 #11
"Vladimir S. Oka" <no****@btopenworld.com> writes:
student wrote:
hi, C is an evergreen programming language developed by denis richie.
C++ is only an extension to C with some extra added features and VC++
provides an IDE for programming. still C is not obselete. why? please
answer to make me a clear view about C.
You cannot be serious!

Go back and check your facts before posting potentially inflamatory
questions. Hints:

- it's Brian W. Kernighan and Dennis M. Ritchie


I believe Ritchie was the primary designer of the language; Kernighan
was the co-author of the book.
- C++ is /not/ an extension, it's a /different/ programing language
True, but C++ is nearly a superset of C, and it was definitely
designed using C as a starting point (thus the name). The original
name was "C with classes".
- VC++ is not /just/ and IDE
He didn't say it was; he said it *provides* an IDE. (I won't mention
your misspelling of "an" -- oops, I just did. 8-)})
- look up Bjarne Stroustrup (in connection with C++)
Ok, but that doesn't contradict anything the OP wrote.
If you research this properly, you'll have your answer. To do that,
you'll have to learn a few things about both C and C++. Right now, you
obviously know nothing about either.
That doesn't seem obvious at all. I have no idea how much the OP
knows about C and C++.
Also, be more careful with your spelling. I'm sure that dmr wouldn't
appreciate being "rebranded": it's Ritchie -- not Richie, it's Dennis
-- not Denis; and I don't even want to go into your not properly
capitalising people's names. BTW, sentences, in general, also begin
with a capital letter.


We've seen *much* worse. Good spelling, grammar, and punctuation are
to be encouraged, but I don't think a few misspellings are worth
worrying about.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
Feb 7 '06 #12
Vladimir S. Oka a écrit :
- C++ is /not/ an extension, it's a /different/ programing language


The goal of C++ is to be a better C.
Thus, it is not very far from being an extension.
Feb 7 '06 #13
loufoque said:
Vladimir S. Oka a écrit :
- C++ is /not/ an extension, it's a /different/ programing language
The goal of C++ is to be a better C.


C is extremely good at being C. C++ is less good at being C, since some C
programs are not legal C++ programs.
Thus, it is not very far from being an extension.


Other things that are not very far from being extensions of C include
Fortran, the Suez Crisis, and the Metropolitan District of South
Humberside.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
Feb 7 '06 #14
Keith Thompson wrote:
"Vladimir S. Oka" <no****@btopenworld.com> writes:
student wrote:
hi, C is an evergreen programming language developed by denis
richie. C++ is only an extension to C with some extra added features
and VC++ provides an IDE for programming. still C is not obselete.
why? please answer to make me a clear view about C.
You cannot be serious!

Go back and check your facts before posting potentially inflamatory
questions. Hints:

- it's Brian W. Kernighan and Dennis M. Ritchie


I believe Ritchie was the primary designer of the language; Kernighan
was the co-author of the book.


I know, but being a non-native speaker I double-checked /my/ spelling by
looking at K&R2 on my desk, and ended up re-typing what I saw. :-/
- C++ is /not/ an extension, it's a /different/ programing language


True, but C++ is nearly a superset of C, and it was definitely
designed using C as a starting point (thus the name). The original
name was "C with classes".


I believe that for purposes of learning, it's actually much better not
to think of C++ in terms of C at all, and especially not the other way
around.
- VC++ is not /just/ and IDE


He didn't say it was; he said it *provides* an IDE. (I won't mention
your misspelling of "an" -- oops, I just did. 8-)})


OOps, indeed -- on both counts. I misread the OP.
- look up Bjarne Stroustrup (in connection with C++)


Ok, but that doesn't contradict anything the OP wrote.


No, but my list was intended as a collection of starting points for
further reading. I can see now, that I didn't spell it out (I hate
Google, which I'm forced to use at work -- composing posts is a
nightmare).
If you research this properly, you'll have your answer. To do that,
you'll have to learn a few things about both C and C++. Right now,
you obviously know nothing about either.


That doesn't seem obvious at all. I have no idea how much the OP
knows about C and C++.


Well, he did ask this to get "a clear view about C". From that I read
that he's not very familiar with it. I still might have misjudged him
on the C++ count.
Also, be more careful with your spelling. I'm sure that dmr wouldn't
appreciate being "rebranded": it's Ritchie -- not Richie, it's Dennis
-- not Denis; and I don't even want to go into your not properly
capitalising people's names. BTW, sentences, in general, also begin
with a capital letter.


We've seen *much* worse. Good spelling, grammar, and punctuation are
to be encouraged, but I don't think a few misspellings are worth
worrying about.


What wound me up in the OP was lack of capitalisation, esp. of
sentences. I almost wished for the sub-variant that (ab)uses ellipses
do delimit them. ;-)

--
BR, Vladimir

There are three kinds of lies: Lies, Damn Lies, and Statistics.
-- Disraeli

Feb 8 '06 #15

"student" <bp*****@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@o13g2000cwo.googlegro ups.com...
C++ is only an extension to C with some extra added features
C++ is it's own language. It has characteristics of C89. It has no
characteristics from C99 (according to Michal Necasek, lead developer of
OpenWATCOM).
C is not obselete[sic]. why? please
answer to make me a clear view about C.


There exists an entire generation of C programmers who have never learned or
need to learn C++. There are many C programmers who feel and think that C++
is inefficient for many, but not all, programming tasks.
Rod Pemberton
Feb 8 '06 #16
Rod Pemberton wrote:

There exists an entire generation of C programmers who have never learned or
need to learn C++. There are many C programmers who feel and think that C++
is inefficient for many, but not all, programming tasks.

There are Luddites everywhere :)

--
Ian Collins.
Feb 8 '06 #17
On Tue, 07 Feb 2006 16:15:08 GMT, "Mike Wahler"
<mk******@mkwahler.net> wrote:
"student" <bp*****@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@o13g2000cwo.googlegro ups.com...
hi, C is an evergreen programming language


C is a programming language. I have no idea what
you mean by 'evergreen'.

'Evergreen' is* used metaphorically to mean 'long-lasting',
'enduring', 'continuing'. Since his point was that C, which is older,
continues to be used widely after the more recent development of C++,
it is an apropos description of that characteristic.

* Although it is my impression (from novels, films, etc.) that some
years ago it was used more commonly than it is now. Thus ironically
'evergreen' itself is not so evergreen.

- David.Thompson1 at worldnet.att.net
Feb 13 '06 #18

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.

Similar topics

1 post views Thread by Amol Chavan | last post: by
21 posts views Thread by Paul Tremblay | last post: by
2 posts views Thread by Alfonso Morra | last post: by
2 posts views Thread by abubakarm | last post: by
3 posts views Thread by sam | last post: by
8 posts views Thread by 2b|!2b==? | last post: by
reply views Thread by mihailmihai484 | last post: by
By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.