By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
445,778 Members | 1,957 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 445,778 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Why do all the compilers I try fail?

P: n/a
I have tried to you so many compilers and none of them seem to work
properly. Can anyone tell me if it's me, my computer or something else?
What does everyone else use?

?...

Crazy Carl

Dec 22 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
12 Replies


P: n/a
"Crazy Carl" <cr*********@myway.com> wrote in news:1135212634.960252.259240
@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
I have tried to you so many compilers and none of them seem to work
properly. Can anyone tell me if it's me, my computer or something else?
It's you.
What does everyone else use?


A compiler for the target platform. Ask on a newsgroup specific to your
operating system and hardware....
Dec 22 '05 #2

P: n/a
Crazy Carl wrote:
I have tried to you so many compilers and none of them seem to work
properly. Can anyone tell me if it's me, my computer or something else?
What does everyone else use?

?...

Crazy Carl

How about make the question more concrete? :D
Dec 22 '05 #3

P: n/a
Crazy Carl wrote:
I have tried to you so many compilers and none of them seem to work
properly. Can anyone tell me if it's me, my computer or something else?
What does everyone else use?


Their brains.

Dec 23 '05 #4

P: n/a

hacker++ wrote:
Their brains.


Thanks for that.... REAL helpful.

Dec 23 '05 #5

P: n/a
I'm trying to learn c++ but no one seems very helpful. I tried reading
the books and learning it that way but I can't try any of the examples
because they wrote the examples for a specific compiler and they don't
work on any other. I'm trying the tutorials which are supposed to teach
the standard but even some of their examples don't work. I'm not old
enough to go to the classes at the collages and universities. I'd like
to know what compilers you use as well as how you went about learning
the language (What books you used, things you tried to do as you were
learning the language, etc.). Any non-derogatory advice would be
helpful. Pickin' on the noobs ain't nice...

Dec 23 '05 #6

P: n/a
Crazy Carl wrote:
I'm trying to learn c++ but no one seems very helpful. I tried reading
the books and learning it that way but I can't try any of the examples
because they wrote the examples for a specific compiler and they don't
work on any other. I'm trying the tutorials which are supposed to teach
the standard but even some of their examples don't work. I'm not old
enough to go to the classes at the collages and universities. I'd like
to know what compilers you use as well as how you went about learning
the language (What books you used, things you tried to do as you were
learning the language, etc.). Any non-derogatory advice would be
helpful. Pickin' on the noobs ain't nice...


Download the Borland compiler. It used to be state of the art, but it's still
good for playing around with C++
http://www.borland.com/downloads/download_cbuilder.html

--
Dirk

The Consensus:-
The political party for the new millenium
http://www.theconsensus.org
Dec 23 '05 #7

P: n/a
Dirk Bruere at Neopax wrote:
Download the Borland compiler. It used to be state of the art, but it's still
good for playing around with C++
http://www.borland.com/downloads/download_cbuilder.html

I do have an older Borland compiler, but if you think this one would
help I'll try it...

Crazy Carl

Dec 23 '05 #8

P: n/a
Crazy Carl wrote:
Dirk Bruere at Neopax wrote:
Download the Borland compiler. It used to be state of the art, but it's still
good for playing around with C++
http://www.borland.com/downloads/download_cbuilder.html


I do have an older Borland compiler, but if you think this one would
help I'll try it...

Crazy Carl


There should be no reason why the old one would not work.
I use 5.5 under XP for syntax checking and debugging before I transfer it to
realtime dev. Got it from the download page.

--
Dirk

The Consensus:-
The political party for the new millenium
http://www.theconsensus.org
Dec 23 '05 #9

P: n/a
On 23 Dec 2005 14:41:57 -0800, "Crazy Carl" <cr*********@myway.com>
wrote:
I do have an older Borland compiler, but if you think this one would
help I'll try it...
Crazy Carl


If you have the Borland C++ 4.5 or anything newer that should be
enough to get you started. Take note that older compilers used the
old header naming convention.

Example: #include <string>
You will use #include<string.h>.

If you have Borland Builder C++ even better. You should have help
files and they should show which headers to use.

If you are stating out examples can be quite confusing. A challange
will be to figure out nuances like above.

Good Luck.

On a side note has anyone ever made a "usable* IDE for the Borland
C++ 5.5 compiler?
Dec 24 '05 #10

P: n/a

Crazy Carl wrote in message
<11**********************@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups .com>...
Dirk Bruere at Neopax wrote:
Download the Borland compiler. It used to be state of the art, but it's still good for playing around with C++
http://www.borland.com/downloads/download_cbuilder.html

I do have an older Borland compiler, but if you think this one would
help I'll try it...

Crazy Carl

Hi Crazy Carl,

[ my suggestions ]

First thing, download and install this.
Dev-C++ IDE: http://www.bloodshed.net/
Get the package that has MinGW (the windows port of GCC (GNU Compiler
Collection)).
Alternate IDEs that will work with the DevCpp GCC(MinGW) installation:
MinGWStudio http://www.parinyasoft.com/
V IDE & V GUI: http://www.objectcentral.com/
Quincy IDE 2005 : http://pipou.net/down/Quincy2005Project.zip
www.gnu.org

Read the docs that come with DevCpp (in the 'help' menu.
--
Bob R
POVrookie
Dec 24 '05 #11

P: n/a

Forgot to add this to other post:

You might find this site interesting.

www.BruceEckel.com -> Books -> "Thinking in C++, vol. 1"
(since it only costs $(a download))

Two heads are better than one, and so are two books!

Note: This is NOT a programming beginner book, but, it has many good examples
to try out. It won't hurt you to read it along with your other books.

--
Bob R
POVrookie
Dec 24 '05 #12

P: n/a
On Sat, 24 Dec 2005 02:11:23 +0000, BobR wrote:

Forgot to add this to other post:

You might find this site interesting.

www.BruceEckel.com -> Books -> "Thinking in C++, vol. 1"
(since it only costs $(a download))

Two heads are better than one, and so are two books!

Note: This is NOT a programming beginner book, but, it has many good examples
to try out. It won't hurt you to read it along with your other books.


Heh, I downloaded those two books a week back (Thanks to someone in #c++
on freenode for the reference)
I whole heartedly recommend them! I have no problems with the examples
(g++ on linux) and I have finally grasped some concepts my previous
hackish attempts failed to understand
It *is* heavy going though, but worth the effort (Im wishing I had found
these books some time ago)

--
You cannot have a science without measurement.
-- R. W. Hamming

Dec 24 '05 #13

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.