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C: A Reference Manual ...

P: n/a
.... by Harbison and Steele

Q. Is this more or less the only book that goes into c99 in a generally
readable way [if indeed it IS readable: I don't have a copy yet]?

I'd like to get a book that covers most of the c99/ansi standard - for one
thing, I find the actual standard, um, rather terse and generally difficult
to read [needless to say, it probably [optimally?] *has* to be written this
way - a kind of geeky legalese].

Also, another question - how close to the 'ISO c99 adopted by ansi' is K&R
Ed. II please?

Thanks v much.
Nov 15 '05 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
"patrick M" <pa******@gmail.com> writes:
... by Harbison and Steele

Q. Is this more or less the only book that goes into c99 in a generally
readable way [if indeed it IS readable: I don't have a copy yet]?
You should always put the entire question in the body of your message,
even if you have to repeat the subject.

Having said that, I don't actually know the answer. I believe the 5th
edition of Harbison and Steele's "C: A Reference Manual" is the first
to cover C99. I know other books cover it to some extent, but I don't
know how well.

[snip]
Also, another question - how close to the 'ISO c99 adopted by ansi' is K&R
Ed. II please?


K&R2 covers only the 1989 ANSI C standard (equivalent to the 1990 ISO
C standard). None of the changes made to the C99 standard are
mentioned, since the book was first published in 1988. (There are
apparently no plans for a K&R3.)

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
Nov 15 '05 #2

P: n/a
Le 07-11-2005, patrick M <pa******@gmail.com> a écrit*:
... by Harbison and Steele

Q. Is this more or less the only book that goes into c99 in a generally
readable way [if indeed it IS readable: I don't have a copy yet]?


I do not known many other books, so, I could not say that it
is the "only one", but, I find it very usefull, well written, and
readable.
It should be mentionned that each chapter ends with a "C++
compatibility" section.

As I said in anoher thread, I was using K&R, and now, even
for c89 features, I mainly uses H&S.

Marc Boyer
Nov 15 '05 #3

P: n/a
patrick M wrote:
[C: A Reference Manual] by Harbison and Steele

Q. Is this more or less the only book that goes into c99 in a generally
readable way [if indeed it IS readable: I don't have a copy yet]?
I havn't read the current edition, but I thought the previous edition
was very readable.
I preferred it for its coverage of the library to K&R
I'd like to get a book that covers most of the c99/ansi standard - for one
thing, I find the actual standard, um, rather terse and generally difficult
to read [needless to say, it probably [optimally?] *has* to be written this
way - a kind of geeky legalese].


I've read a few standards, the C standard is eminantly readable, and
short. I have a physical copy of the C++ standard and it weighs over 4
pounds (I ran out of weights
on my kitchen scales). For an interesting alternative approach to
specifying a
language take a look the Alogol 68 Report.

<snip>
--
Nick Keighley

I mean, if 10 years from now, when you are doing something quick and
dirty,
you suddenly visualize that I am looking over your shoulders and say to
yourself, "Dijkstra would not have liked this", well that would be
enough
immortality for me.
-- Edsger W Dijkstra

Nov 15 '05 #4

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