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What about a C compiler with structured data management INSIDE ?

P: n/a
HELLO !

in upper case: i mean to be heard ;o)

Compilers are good !
Myself, i used TP6 and TP7 to work on dBASE V files, once ... a long
time ago.

I was unaware of Internet Usenet world, fool of me !

Today i use Internet and Html (hand coding HTML, quite a dumb)also XML
and XSLT and so on...!
Like any one of you.

And it appears me that, internet for "clients" costumers, or people who
don't want to be tighted to a server, is too stretchy.

Yes stretchy, because even if on client side there is no real need of a
server, there is a need to fake a server. I explain myself : you can be
like any one interested in structured like files known as XML and want
to make data collection of any item you know or own (you can own
something only y knowing it).

Why dont make "Structured" files which can be displayed as HTML files ?
Put in a drive or in a floppy to latter print or make a book!

And here stand the problem.

Internet client side is usually (just tell me if i am wrong) not
compilable program eg javascript and others...

Compiler for internet are server side.
So structuring and writing files are on server side.

And here you can se bright and clear the original question, which need
an clear answer !
What about a C compiler to manage structured files like XML XSL and so
on ?

Any bit of info to make the whole thing take off, will be welcome !

HALLES.
The paradoxal thinker, lives in FRANCE !

Nov 15 '05 #1
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P: n/a
HALLES wrote:

I was unaware of Internet Usenet world, fool of me !


Then read the following, and pay heed to the info in my sig line
below.

Some useful references about C:
<http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt>
<http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
<http://benpfaff.org/writings/clc/off-topic.html>
<http://anubis.dkuug.dk/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n869/> (C99)
<http://www.dinkumware.com/refxc.html> (C-library}
<http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/> (GNU docs)

--
"If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
"show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
"Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson
Nov 15 '05 #2

P: n/a
Hello !

Seems some other people have the need to structure info .

I will pay attention to the links you sent me.
Do you WHY C is such interesting a compiler ?
Because it can accept Exceptions, Pascal does not accept exceptions.

Regards.

HALLES
CBFalconer a écrit :
HALLES wrote:

I was unaware of Internet Usenet world, fool of me !


Then read the following, and pay heed to the info in my sig line
below.

Some useful references about C:
<http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt>
<http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
<http://benpfaff.org/writings/clc/off-topic.html>
<http://anubis.dkuug.dk/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n869/> (C99)
<http://www.dinkumware.com/refxc.html> (C-library}
<http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/> (GNU docs)

--
"If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
"show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
"Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson


Nov 15 '05 #3

P: n/a
"HALLES" <sl*********@yahoo.fr> writes:
I will pay attention to the links you sent me.
Do you WHY C is such interesting a compiler ?
You meant "Do you know ...", right?

C is a language, not a compiler.
Because it can accept Exceptions, Pascal does not accept exceptions.


C doesn't have support exceptions, at least not directly. If you're
thinking of C++, which does have exceptions, you'll need to try
comp.lang.c++.

And please don't top-post. Your response should follow any quoted
text, not precede it. The purpose is to make your followup make sense
when read from top to bottom.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) ks***@mib.org <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
Nov 15 '05 #4

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