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Help needed: Is Quick-Union-Find the right solution to this problem ?

P: n/a
The user can dynamically enter and change the rule connection between
objects. The rule is a "<" and so given two objects:
a < b simply means that b < a can't be set, also it must be a != b.
And with three objects a < b , b < c means a < c

I studied Quick Union Find algorithms a bit and if I understood them
correctly, once the user gives the input setting the rules/connection
between objects, the algorithm will give as output the result of the
solved connections between objects.

As far as I check on the array or given list of objects from user
input that it's never added anything like a = b nor b<a when a<b it's
already in the list, would it work as expected so that I know which
objects in the list are "the strongest" ones as per user given rules ?

I tried thinking about using simple logic like AND,OR,XOR of compare
results values but I couldn't find a way to ensure that the
transitivity rule could be mantained.

So, is a DAG or Quick Union Find the way to go ?

My only concern about Quick Union Find is that it constructs a graph
with a single highest level root like a tree, right ? But if I am not
wrong the user could set things in such a way that the graph would
have more than one "root" .. ?!

Someone please help me to understand what's the right thing I should
use, and the simpler one that would still let me solve the "which is
stronger" among the user given objects and user set rules.

Nov 14 '05 #1
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P: n/a
On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 17:05:05 +0000, aredo3604gif wrote:
The user can dynamically enter and change the rule connection between
objects. The rule is a "<" and so given two objects:
a < b simply means that b < a can't be set, also it must be a != b.
And with three objects a < b , b < c means a < c

I studied Quick Union Find algorithms a bit and if I understood them
correctly, once the user gives the input setting the rules/connection
between objects, the algorithm will give as output the result of the
solved connections between objects.


....

There is nothing in your question that obviously relates to the topic of
this newsgroup i.e. the C programming language. Your nest bet would be to
post to an algorithms related newsgroup such as comp.programming.

Lawrence
Nov 14 '05 #2

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