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What is the single most helpfull guide/reference one could go to!?

P: n/a
When learning the C programing languages, i have had and still am
having the problem of not being able to find answers to many
questions. Is their an overall guide/reference that someone knows?
Nov 14 '05 #1
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P: n/a
erebus- wrote:
When learning the C programing languages, i have had and still am
having the problem of not being able to find answers to many
questions. Is their an overall guide/reference that someone knows?


This group, plus K&R2ed, are probably the best resources.

/david

--
"As a scientist, Throckmorton knew that if he were ever to break wind in
the echo chamber, he would never hear the end of it."

Nov 14 '05 #2

P: n/a
erebus- wrote:
When learning the C programing languages, i have had and still am
having the problem of not being able to find answers to many
questions. Is their an overall guide/reference that someone knows?


The single most definitive reference is the ISO C Standard, ISO/IEC 9899.
There is a new version, dated 1999, but the Real World hasn't caught up
yet, and most compilers still implement the 1990 Standard.

The single most /helpful/ reference? Well, that's a bit harder. The language
of the Standard is not intended to be friendly, but to be definitive. The
most /helpful/ reference for a relative beginner is probably "The C
Programming Language", 2nd edition, by Brian W Kernighan and Dennis M
Ritchie (by the way, Dennis Ritchie also wrote the C language itself). It's
a remarkable book. Short by modern standards at 272 pages, it is
nevertheless packed to overflowing with useful, well-explained material.

--
Richard Heathfield : bi****@eton.powernet.co.uk
"Usenet is a strange place." - Dennis M Ritchie, 29 July 1999.
C FAQ: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
K&R answers, C books, etc: http://users.powernet.co.uk/eton
Nov 14 '05 #3

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"Richard Heathfield" <in*****@address.co.uk.invalid> wrote in
The single most definitive reference is the ISO C Standard, ISO/IEC > 9899.
The single most /helpful/ reference? "The C Programming Language",
2nd edition, by Brian W Kernighan and Dennis M Ritchie

What is badly needed is a second book of C, for those who know the basics
but want to know how to apply it. For this I recommend "C Unleashed" by R.
Heathfield.
Nov 14 '05 #4

P: n/a
On Sun, 21 Feb 2004, erebus- wrote:
When learning the C programing languages, i have had and still am
having the problem of not being able to find answers to many
questions. Is their an overall guide/reference that someone knows?


Depends on how much money you are willing to spend. You could hire Dan
Pop, Richard Heathfield or one of the many other regulars of comp.lang.c
to be your guide.

I'd recommend the follow:

1) Get a good book on C. People like different writing styles so there
is no one answer on this. Use Google newsgroups to search for past
discussion on what is a good book. Search for "site:comp.lang.c book
recommendation" and you should find something.

2) Find a newsgroup that can help you with your specific implementation.
There is nothing more frustrating then not being able to get the compiler
to work properly. You don't need that frustration while you are learning
to program.

3) Find and read the FAQ for this newsgroup. Make sure you understand what
you read. If you don't understand WHY the answer is what it is then ask.

4) Try some of the assignments you will find in books. Post your code to
comp.lang.c when it fails to work. If the code is large, ask in
comp.programming for techniques on how to isolate a defect in your code.
Once you get it down to a small code snippet, if it is still not obvious
to you, post it to comp.lang.c.

5) Learn to use search engines. Search comp.lang.c. Someone has probably
had the same problem you are having.

6) If you can afford it, get a local tutor or take a class. I occasionally
post ads at the local universities offering my services. I often find
students struggle for days only to be frustrated. I can sometimes
straighten them out in an hour or two. Don't confuse a good tutor with
someone who will do the homework for you. You want to hire someone with
teaching experience and not just programming experience.

Most importantly is to try things and ask questions. Even if you think you
have the code perfect it never hurts to post it to comp.lang.c and see if
you are making a bad assumption.

--
Send e-mail to: darrell at cs dot toronto dot edu
Don't send e-mail to vi************@whitehouse.gov
Nov 14 '05 #5

P: n/a
da*****@NOMORESPAMcs.utoronto.ca.com (Darrell Grainger) wrote in message news:<Pi******************************@drj.pf>...
On Sun, 21 Feb 2004, erebus- wrote:
When learning the C programing languages, i have had and still am
having the problem of not being able to find answers to many
questions. Is their an overall guide/reference that someone knows?


Depends on how much money you are willing to spend. You could hire Dan
Pop, Richard Heathfield or one of the many other regulars of comp.lang.c
to be your guide.

I'd recommend the follow:

1) Get a good book on C. People like different writing styles so there
is no one answer on this. Use Google newsgroups to search for past
discussion on what is a good book. Search for "site:comp.lang.c book
recommendation" and you should find something.

2) Find a newsgroup that can help you with your specific implementation.
There is nothing more frustrating then not being able to get the compiler
to work properly. You don't need that frustration while you are learning
to program.

3) Find and read the FAQ for this newsgroup. Make sure you understand what
you read. If you don't understand WHY the answer is what it is then ask.

4) Try some of the assignments you will find in books. Post your code to
comp.lang.c when it fails to work. If the code is large, ask in
comp.programming for techniques on how to isolate a defect in your code.
Once you get it down to a small code snippet, if it is still not obvious
to you, post it to comp.lang.c.

5) Learn to use search engines. Search comp.lang.c. Someone has probably
had the same problem you are having.

6) If you can afford it, get a local tutor or take a class. I occasionally
post ads at the local universities offering my services. I often find
students struggle for days only to be frustrated. I can sometimes
straighten them out in an hour or two. Don't confuse a good tutor with
someone who will do the homework for you. You want to hire someone with
teaching experience and not just programming experience.

Most importantly is to try things and ask questions. Even if you think you
have the code perfect it never hurts to post it to comp.lang.c and see if
you are making a bad assumption.


Thank you very much for that reply. I will try to follow through with
the advice that you've given me the best that I can. I just went out
to my local Fry's Elecrtonics and bought me C: The Complete Reference
and The C Programming languages, hoping that they will help me along
the way, and will improve what i already know. I'm at that stage where
pointers, dynamic memory allocation, and buffered file i/o are the
toughest things going on in my life, yet the ones that satisfy me the
most. I'm reading the FAQ at this very moment :), and if you noticed,
that was actually my first post here.
Nov 14 '05 #6

P: n/a
"Malcolm" <ma*****@55bank.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:
"Richard Heathfield" <in*****@address.co.uk.invalid> wrote in
The single most definitive reference is the ISO C Standard, ISO/IEC >

9899.

The single most /helpful/ reference? "The C Programming Language",
2nd edition, by Brian W Kernighan and Dennis M Ritchie

What is badly needed is a second book of C, for those who know the basics
but want to know how to apply it. For this I recommend "C Unleashed" by R.
Heathfield.


Et aliis, some of whom are also to be found in this 'ere group. I second
this recommendation, but I do recommend you take a sturdy bag when you
go pick it up - a mere plastic sack is guaranteed to tear.

Richard
Nov 14 '05 #7

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