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Designer's notes

P: n/a
Sirs

I have written a few "Designer's notes":
"(-: A computer (embedded (real-time)) programmer's notes :-)"
which I believe have had no readers so far!

If anybody finds them interesting or have comments, I'd
be glad to hear from you.

See http://home.no.net/oyvteig/pub/notes

--
Oyvind (Řyvind) Teig, Trondheim, Norway
http://home.no.net/oyvteig (Reply-to address there)

Nov 14 '05 #1
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P: n/a
oyvteig <le********@hotmail.com> wrote in
news:br************@ID-218470.news.uni-berlin.de:
Sirs
So there are no women C programmers? This is a newsgroup, not a letter
recipient.
I have written a few "Designer's notes":
"(-: A computer (embedded (real-time)) programmer's notes :-)"
which I believe have had no readers so far!

If anybody finds them interesting or have comments, I'd
be glad to hear from you.


This would be better posted in comp.arch.embedded, eh?

--
- Mark ->
--
Nov 14 '05 #2

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"Mark A. Odell" <no****@embeddedfw.com> wrote in message
news:Xn********************************@130.133.1. 4...
oyvteig <le********@hotmail.com> wrote in
news:br************@ID-218470.news.uni-berlin.de:
Sirs


So there are no women C programmers? This is a newsgroup, not a letter
recipient.


In English grammar, the masculine embraces the feminine. Use
of the masculine form implies inclusion of the feminine.
Nov 14 '05 #3

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"xarax" <xa***@email.com> wrote in
news:Ep*****************@newsread1.news.pas.earthl ink.net:
> Sirs


So there are no women C programmers? This is a newsgroup, not a letter
recipient.


In English grammar, the masculine embraces the feminine. Use
of the masculine form implies inclusion of the feminine.


I think "dear group" would have been just as easy.

--
- Mark ->
--
Nov 14 '05 #4

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xarax <xa***@email.com> spoke thus:
In English grammar, the masculine embraces the feminine. Use
of the masculine form implies inclusion of the feminine.


*Formal* English grammar. "He" is still grammatically correct for a
person of unknown gender, but "he/she" is becoming the de facto
standard. I also don't believe "sir" is a synonym for "sir or madam."

--
Christopher Benson-Manica | I *should* know what I'm talking about - if I
ataru(at)cyberspace.org | don't, I need to know. Flames welcome.
Nov 14 '05 #5

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On Mon, 15 Dec 2003 19:09:46 +0000 (UTC), Christopher Benson-Manica
<at***@nospam.cyberspace.org> wrote:
xarax <xa***@email.com> spoke thus:
In English grammar, the masculine embraces the feminine. Use
of the masculine form implies inclusion of the feminine.
*Formal* English grammar. "He" is still grammatically correct for a
person of unknown gender, but "he/she" is becoming the de facto
standard.


Not around here - I hardly ever see it, probably because it looks and
sounds so awkward.
I also don't believe "sir" is a synonym for "sir or madam."


No, but the OP didn't use that. He said "Sirs:" which is a correct
salutation when addressing unknowns.

--
Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
re************************@att.net
Nov 14 '05 #6

P: n/a
Alan Balmer <al******@att.net> spoke thus:
Not around here - I hardly ever see it, probably because it looks and
sounds so awkward.
Given the gender makeup of this group, it isn't really an issue. I
think in formal contexts, however, "one" is to be preferred over "he,"
else one may be semi-justly accused of sexism.
No, but the OP didn't use that. He said "Sirs:" which is a correct
salutation when addressing unknowns.


Do you have a source for that? I wasn't of that impression.

--
Christopher Benson-Manica | I *should* know what I'm talking about - if I
ataru(at)cyberspace.org | don't, I need to know. Flames welcome.
Nov 14 '05 #7

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On Mon, 15 Dec 2003 19:39:55 +0000 (UTC), Christopher Benson-Manica
<at***@nospam.cyberspace.org> wrote:
No, but the OP didn't use that. He said "Sirs:" which is a correct
salutation when addressing unknowns.


Do you have a source for that? I wasn't of that impression.


When I was in school, it was taught as the proper salutation for
business letters when names were unknown. I don't have much time at
the moment, and a search on "forms of address" seems to give me only
how to address kings and presidents and such, but try a Google search
on "dear sirs" (with the quotes) to see lots of examples.

--
Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
re************************@att.net
Nov 14 '05 #8

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Alan Balmer wrote:

(snip)
I also don't believe "sir" is a synonym for "sir or madam."
No, but the OP didn't use that. He said "Sirs:" which is a correct
salutation when addressing unknowns.

Well, at least in the Dear sirs: form.

"To whom it may concern:" seems to be getting more popular,
but I think most people know what "Dear sirs:" means.

-- glen

Nov 14 '05 #9

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Alan Balmer wrote:
When I was in school, ["Sirs"] was taught as the proper salutation for
business letters when names were unknown. I don't have much time at
the moment, and a search on "forms of address" seems to give me only
how to address kings and presidents and such,


That is /so/ important. :-)

--
Richard Heathfield : bi****@eton.powernet.co.uk
"Usenet is a strange place." - Dennis M Ritchie, 29 July 1999.
C FAQ: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
K&R answers, C books, etc: http://users.powernet.co.uk/eton
Nov 14 '05 #10

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On Mon, 15 Dec 2003 19:39:55 +0000 (UTC), in comp.lang.c , Christopher
Benson-Manica <at***@nospam.cyberspace.org> wrote:
Alan Balmer <al******@att.net> spoke thus:
No, but the OP didn't use that. He said "Sirs:" which is a correct
salutation when addressing unknowns.


Do you have a source for that? I wasn't of that impression.


When addressing an unknown person, you begin "Dear sir" unless you're
writing to the newspapers, in which case you begin "Sir".

This is Common Knowledge amongst those of us with proper educations,
old boy, don'cha know, what?

--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.com/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc.html>
----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Nov 14 '05 #11

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Richard Heathfield wrote:
Alan Balmer wrote:
When I was in school, ["Sirs"] was taught as the proper salutation for
business letters when names were unknown. I don't have much time at
the moment, and a search on "forms of address" seems to give me only
how to address kings and presidents and such,


That is /so/ important. :-)


He has an incomplete text. It should deal with addressing kings,
presidents, popes, bishops, me, and the hoi-palloi. :-)

--
Chuck F (cb********@yahoo.com) (cb********@worldnet.att.net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net> USE worldnet address!

Nov 14 '05 #12

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Sirs..

You are invited to give me in for more than a Sirs statement!

http://home.no.net/oyvteig/pub/notes/index.html
There's meant to be some comp.language.c valid stuff in there.
Or better comp.language.any iff it existed.

--
Oyvind (Řyvind) Teig, Trondheim, Norway
http://home.no.net/oyvteig (Reply-to address there)

Nov 14 '05 #13

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On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 05:19:16 GMT, CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.com>
wrote:
Richard Heathfield wrote:
Alan Balmer wrote:
> When I was in school, ["Sirs"] was taught as the proper salutation for
> business letters when names were unknown. I don't have much time at
> the moment, and a search on "forms of address" seems to give me only
> how to address kings and presidents and such,


That is /so/ important. :-)


He has an incomplete text. It should deal with addressing kings,
presidents, popes, bishops, me, and the hoi-palloi. :-)


You and the hoi-palloi might be in there, but I went to sleep before I
got that far :-)

--
Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
re************************@att.net
Nov 14 '05 #14

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In <8arDb.401767$ao4.1319675@attbi_s51> glen herrmannsfeldt <ga*@ugcs.caltech.edu> writes:
Alan Balmer wrote:

(snip)
I also don't believe "sir" is a synonym for "sir or madam."

No, but the OP didn't use that. He said "Sirs:" which is a correct
salutation when addressing unknowns.


Well, at least in the Dear sirs: form.

"To whom it may concern:" seems to be getting more popular,
but I think most people know what "Dear sirs:" means.


"To whom it may concern:" doesn't look like a salutation to me.

Dan
--
Dan Pop
DESY Zeuthen, RZ group
Email: Da*****@ifh.de
Nov 14 '05 #15

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On Tue, 16 Dec 2003, Dan Pop wrote:

glen herrmannsfeldt <ga*@ugcs.caltech.edu> writes:
Alan Balmer wrote:

(snip)
I also don't believe "sir" is a synonym for "sir or madam."

No, but the OP didn't use that. He said "Sirs:" which is a correct
salutation when addressing unknowns.


Well, at least in the Dear sirs: form.

"To whom it may concern:" seems to be getting more popular,
but I think most people know what "Dear sirs:" means.


"To whom it may concern:" doesn't look like a salutation to me.


Not in the sense that "Good morning!" or "Halloo!" is a salutation,
but in the sense that "Dear sirs," or "To whom it may concern:" is
a salutation, yes it is. (IOW, sense 3 of the first definition from
Google, not sense 1.)
This is another of those times where I can't tell whether your
post is supposed to be humorous, or a real statement of ignorance
(in the "I never saw that" sense, not the "I'm stupid" sense, of
course).
"To whom it may concern" is IME getting less popular as a salutation,
even in correspondence in which it might once have been appropriate,
because it looks stuffy and impersonal. Maybe it's just that these
days, when you're taking all the "trouble" to write a letter, you're
expected to know who's going to be reading it, exactly (or, in the
case of letters to your elected officials, to at least *pretend* you
know who's going to read them).

-Arthur
Nov 14 '05 #16

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