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multiply random number

P: n/a
Suppose I have a function rand() that can generate one integer random
number between 0 and 100. Suppose also rand() is very expensive. What
is the fastest way to generate 10 different random number between 0 and
100? (call rand() only 10 times...)

Thanks,

qq

Nov 11 '05 #1
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11 Replies


P: n/a
quick...@yahoo.com wrote:
Suppose I have a function rand() that can generate one integer random
number between 0 and 100. Suppose also rand() is very expensive. What
is the fastest way to generate 10 different random number between 0 and
100? (call rand() only 10 times...)

Thanks,

qq


If you're not talking about the standard function std::rand(), then
your post is off topic here since it is not concerned with the C++
language or libraries. See the FAQ for what is on-topic:
http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lit...t.html#faq-5.9. You
probably want a newsgroup dealing with algorithms in general (e.g.,
comp.programming) or one dealing with random number generation.

Cheers! --M

Nov 11 '05 #2

P: n/a
qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Suppose I have a function rand() that can generate one integer random
number between 0 and 100. Suppose also rand() is very expensive. What
is the fastest way to generate 10 different random number between 0 and
100? (call rand() only 10 times...)


Is there a C++ language question somewhere hiding in all this? For
general programming questions consider 'comp.programming'.

If you're talking about the Standard function 'rand', then it (a) doesn't
generate 0 to 100 numbers, its limits are 0 and RAND_MAX, and (b) is in
fact quite inexpensive.

V
Nov 11 '05 #3

P: n/a
qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Suppose I have a function rand() that can generate one integer random
number between 0 and 100. Suppose also rand() is very expensive. What
is the fastest way to generate 10 different random number between 0 and
100? (call rand() only 10 times...)

Thanks,

qq


I don't think it is possible to solve that problem and guarantee to only
call rand() 10 times. I could be wrong.

john
Nov 11 '05 #4

P: n/a
John Harrison wrote:
qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Suppose I have a function rand() that can generate one integer random
number between 0 and 100. Suppose also rand() is very expensive. What
is the fastest way to generate 10 different random number between 0 and
100? (call rand() only 10 times...)
I don't think it is possible to solve that problem and guarantee to only
call rand() 10 times. I could be wrong.


You can, for example, create a list with the numbers from 0 to 100, call
rand, pick the number obtained and remove it from the list, call rand and
pick the number obtained modulus the remaining elements in the list, remove
it from the list, and repeat the times desired.

--
Salu2
Nov 11 '05 #5

P: n/a
John Harrison wrote:
qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Suppose I have a function rand() that can generate one integer random
number between 0 and 100. Suppose also rand() is very expensive. What
is the fastest way to generate 10 different random number between 0 and
100? (call rand() only 10 times...)

Thanks,

qq


I don't think it is possible to solve that problem and guarantee to only
call rand() 10 times. I could be wrong.


I am thinking something in the direction of: make a vector of 100 values,
ten loops, each containing: a calls to 'rand()' to get an index, extract
the value from the vector, amend the value indexed to the value below or
above it, unless it's been already extracted, then keep going in that
direction until reaching the value that hasn't been extracted yet. The
proof of the randomness of the values extracted that way lies on the OP.

V
Nov 11 '05 #6

P: n/a
Julián Albo wrote:
John Harrison wrote:

qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Suppose I have a function rand() that can generate one integer random
number between 0 and 100. Suppose also rand() is very expensive. What
is the fastest way to generate 10 different random number between 0 and
100? (call rand() only 10 times...)


I don't think it is possible to solve that problem and guarantee to only
call rand() 10 times. I could be wrong.

You can, for example, create a list with the numbers from 0 to 100, call
rand, pick the number obtained and remove it from the list, call rand and
pick the number obtained modulus the remaining elements in the list, remove
it from the list, and repeat the times desired.


But after you remove an item for the list you need a random number from
0 to 99, and you haven't got that. By using a modulus you are biasing
the pick, so unless you list is random in the first place (which it
isn't) you are going to get biased results.

john
Nov 11 '05 #7

P: n/a
Julián Albo wrote:
John Harrison wrote:

qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Suppose I have a function rand() that can generate one integer random
number between 0 and 100. Suppose also rand() is very expensive. What
is the fastest way to generate 10 different random number between 0 and
100? (call rand() only 10 times...)


I don't think it is possible to solve that problem and guarantee to only
call rand() 10 times. I could be wrong.

You can, for example, create a list with the numbers from 0 to 100, call
rand, pick the number obtained and remove it from the list, call rand and
pick the number obtained modulus the remaining elements in the list, remove
it from the list, and repeat the times desired.


The OP didn't specify but if the desired distribution is uniformly
random then this will not work (i.e., not all outcomes are equally likely).
Nov 11 '05 #8

P: n/a
Victor Bazarov wrote:
John Harrison wrote:
qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Suppose I have a function rand() that can generate one integer random
number between 0 and 100. Suppose also rand() is very expensive. What
is the fastest way to generate 10 different random number between 0 and
100? (call rand() only 10 times...)

Thanks,

qq


I don't think it is possible to solve that problem and guarantee to
only call rand() 10 times. I could be wrong.

I am thinking something in the direction of: make a vector of 100 values,
ten loops, each containing: a calls to 'rand()' to get an index, extract
the value from the vector, amend the value indexed to the value below or
above it, unless it's been already extracted, then keep going in that
direction until reaching the value that hasn't been extracted yet. The
proof of the randomness of the values extracted that way lies on the OP.

V


It's clever, but it doesn't sound random to me.

Suppose your initial list is 0 to 100 and the first random number picks
5. So 5 is one of your random numbers, but in the list 5 gets replaced
with the next higher number, i.e. 6. So now you have two sixes in the
list. And if either of those sixes gets hit you'll have three sevens, etc.

I think you'll will get more bunching than you would with a
straightforward random pick.

john
Nov 11 '05 #9

P: n/a
John Harrison wrote:
You can, for example, create a list with the numbers from 0 to 100, call
rand, pick the number obtained and remove it from the list, call rand and
pick the number obtained modulus the remaining elements in the list,
remove it from the list, and repeat the times desired.


But after you remove an item for the list you need a random number from
0 to 99, and you haven't got that. By using a modulus you are biasing
the pick, so unless you list is random in the first place (which it
isn't) you are going to get biased results.


Is a random result. Certainly is not equally distributed as the original
rand function, but the distribution properties of the result were not in
the OP conditions, it just asked for speed and for call rand 10 times.

--
Salu2
Nov 11 '05 #10

P: n/a
qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Suppose I have a function rand() that can generate one integer random
number between 0 and 100. Suppose also rand() is very expensive. What
is the fastest way to generate 10 different random number between 0 and
100? (call rand() only 10 times...)

Thanks,

qq


This is an instance of a general problem of converting random values
from one set into random values from another set. In your case there
are (100 C 10) possible outcomes and you have random values from a set
of size 100. Since (100 C 10) is not divisible by 100, there is no way
to guarantee the number of required operations.

You can do well on expectation though and a short illustration should
give you the idea. Suppose you want to pick a number between 1 and 5
and you only have a coin. Flip it three times to get a number between 1
and 8. If the number is less than or equal to 5, you're done.
Otherwise you have one of three numbers. Flip once more get another bit
which, combined with the leftover choice among three, gives you one
among 6 values. If the value is 1-5 your done, otherwise repeat the
process.

I'm not sure this is optimal but as you can see, unless rand() truly is
expensive, it's probably not worth the effort.

Mark
Nov 11 '05 #11

P: n/a
On 2005-11-11, John Harrison <jo*************@hotmail.com> wrote:
Victor Bazarov wrote:
John Harrison wrote:
qu******@yahoo.com wrote:
Suppose I have a function rand() that can generate one
integer random number between 0 and 100. Suppose also rand()
is very expensive. What is the fastest way to generate 10
different random number between 0 and 100? (call rand() only
10 times...)

I am thinking something in the direction of: make a vector of
100 values, ten loops, each containing: a calls to 'rand()' to
get an index, extract the value from the vector, amend the
value indexed to the value below or above it, unless it's been
already extracted, then keep going in that direction until
reaching the value that hasn't been extracted yet. The proof
of the randomness of the values extracted that way lies on the
OP.

V


It's clever, but it doesn't sound random to me.

Suppose your initial list is 0 to 100 and the first random
number picks 5. So 5 is one of your random numbers, but in the
list 5 gets replaced with the next higher number, i.e. 6. So
now you have two sixes in the list. And if either of those
sixes gets hit you'll have three sevens, etc.

I think you'll will get more bunching than you would with a
straightforward random pick.


If the OP really gave a crap about randomness he wouldn't be
worried about getting duplicates. ;-)

Anyhow, I took a stab at it, using a rotating translation table.

And, err, rand_expensive needs to be *really* expensive before
adopting this solution.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>

using namespace std;

int rand_expensive()
{
/* Spend millions of resources somehow doing the following: */
return rand()%101;
}

struct counter
{
int c_;
counter(int c): c_(c) { }
int operator()()
{
return c_++;
}
};

int main()
{
srand(time(0));
vector<int> nums;
vector<int> range(101);
generate_n(range.begin(), 101, counter(0));
for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
int r = rand_expensive();
while (find(nums.begin(), nums.end(), range[r]) != nums.end())
{
rotate(range.begin(), range.begin()+1, range.end());
}
nums.push_back(range[r]);
}
copy(nums.begin(), nums.end(), ostream_iterator<int>(cout, " "));
cout << endl;
return 0;
}

--
Neil Cerutti
Nov 11 '05 #12

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