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Any down to earth c++ reference guides?

P: n/a
Hi,

Are there any reference guides, preferably online, for MS Visual C++
(or generic C++ probably is fine too), that give a simple overview of
the most commonly used C++ functions and techniques (like the command
to display a popup message for instance)? I need something that even a
3rd grader can understand, since I'm not a programming professional
dedicated to C++, but simply working on a little application at home.
I know I'll get bashed for saying this but I can't be the only one
frustrated by the unnecessary and unhelpful complexity of the
documentation currently available.

Thank you.

Aug 4 '05 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
Or if not, could comebody please just enlighten me as to the command
for displaying a popup message? There is such a forest of information
that I can't find the answer to this simple question in a search. Your
help is greatly appreciated.

Aug 4 '05 #2

P: n/a
cplusplus.com? I personally started from there.

C++ does't deal with message boxes. If you are on windows, look for
MessageBox api docs on windows.com

Aug 4 '05 #3

P: n/a
Thank you. Yes I am on windows using MS Visual C++.

Aug 4 '05 #4

P: n/a
"djohnson" <pr***********@msn.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@g47g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
Hi,

Are there any reference guides, preferably online, for MS Visual C++
There's a plethora of information on Microsoft Visual C++
at www.msdn.microsoft.com. But note that an implementation
is not the language. The C++ language itself is topical
here, specific implemementations are not.
(or generic C++ probably is fine too),
There are many good books on standard C++. See www.accu.org
for peer reviews. There's only one online book I know of that
I'd recommend: Bruce Eckel's "Thinking in C++" -- www.mindview.net
that give a simple overview of
the most commonly used C++ functions
Probably the most commonly used C++ functions are those which
are part of the standard library. For good explanations and
tutorials for those, see this book: www.josuttis.com
There are also many online standard library references, e.g.
at www.dinkumware.com
and techniques (like the command
to display a popup message for instance)?
The C++ language does not define anything such as 'popup' or 'message',
so of course there's no standard function offered by the language.

Perhaps you're looking for instruction with the Microsoft Windows
API? In that case, present your questins in a Windows newsgroup,
e.g. comp.os-ms-windows.programmer.win32
I need something that even a
3rd grader can understand, since I'm not a programming professional
dedicated to C++, but simply working on a little application at home.
IMO if you're not *serious* about programming and spending the necessary
time to learn, then C++ is not for you. C++ is a *huge, complex* language,
that takes (even professionals) years to master. Perhaps you'd be better
off with a simpler language.
I know I'll get bashed for saying this but I can't be the only one
frustrated by the unnecessary and unhelpful complexity of the
documentation currently available.
If you have a C++ implementation whose documentation is wanting,
I suggest shopping for a different one. There are many decent
free ones on the net.

Finally, if you select only materials (books, etc) which discuss the
standard C++ language, then which implementation you use doesn't matter
(as long as it's reasonably standard-compliant).


Thank you.


You're welcome.

-Mike
Aug 4 '05 #5

P: n/a
"djohnson" <pr***********@msn.com> wrote in news:1123165287.141475.114990
@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
Or if not, could comebody please just enlighten me as to the command
for displaying a popup message? There is such a forest of information
that I can't find the answer to this simple question in a search. Your
help is greatly appreciated.


You're in the wrong newsgroup. comp.lang.c++ is for Standard C++. There's
no such thing as a "popup message" in Standard C++. You'll need to ask in
a platform or vendor-specific newsgroup for this.
Aug 4 '05 #6

P: n/a

Mike Wahler wrote:
"djohnson" <pr***********@msn.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@g47g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
Hi,

Are there any reference guides, preferably online, for MS Visual C++
There's a plethora of information on Microsoft Visual C++
at www.msdn.microsoft.com. But note that an implementation
is not the language. The C++ language itself is topical
here, specific implemementations are not.

This is the very first question I've posted regarding C++ and it was
not clear to me where to post it. Now I know. Thanks.
(or generic C++ probably is fine too),


There are many good books on standard C++. See www.accu.org
for peer reviews. There's only one online book I know of that
I'd recommend: Bruce Eckel's "Thinking in C++" -- www.mindview.net
that give a simple overview of
the most commonly used C++ functions


Probably the most commonly used C++ functions are those which
are part of the standard library. For good explanations and
tutorials for those, see this book: www.josuttis.com
There are also many online standard library references, e.g.
at www.dinkumware.com
and techniques (like the command
to display a popup message for instance)?


The C++ language does not define anything such as 'popup' or 'message',
so of course there's no standard function offered by the language.

Perhaps you're looking for instruction with the Microsoft Windows
API? In that case, present your questins in a Windows newsgroup,
e.g. comp.os-ms-windows.programmer.win32


I did mention I was using MS Visual C++ so yes.
I need something that even a
3rd grader can understand, since I'm not a programming professional
dedicated to C++, but simply working on a little application at home.


IMO if you're not *serious* about programming and spending the necessary
time to learn, then C++ is not for you. C++ is a *huge, complex* language,
that takes (even professionals) years to master. Perhaps you'd be better
off with a simpler language.


Well I'm serious, but I do not have the luxury or fortune of being
able to use it for work. I have to use it during the small amount of
time I have at home because I have no choice in the matter. It's not
like I can decide my career, some corpoartion does. I've had
experience with many facets of computers including scripting languages,
embedded programming, database server administration, multimedia
programming, and have decided to use C++ at home as a way to avoid
having to deal with less powerful tools.
I know I'll get bashed for saying this but I can't be the only one
frustrated by the unnecessary and unhelpful complexity of the
documentation currently available.


If you have a C++ implementation whose documentation is wanting,
I suggest shopping for a different one. There are many decent
free ones on the net.


Are you making reference to MS? I don't like dealing with this evil
company but MS rules us, so it's not like I have a choice. I know
their online documentation is intentionaly useless because they want to
sell their certification classes. But I would think that MS would make
the language most suitable to write apps for the OS which we have no
choice but to use.
Finally, if you select only materials (books, etc) which discuss the
standard C++ language, then which implementation you use doesn't matter
(as long as it's reasonably standard-compliant).

I know, I need to become better at reading the APIs but even then I
would need some kind of *friendly* overview of the most commonly used
procedures, due to the immensity of the APIs.
Dave

Aug 4 '05 #7

P: n/a
djohnson wrote:

Mike Wahler wrote:
"djohnson" <pr***********@msn.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@g47g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
I've had experience with many facets of computers including scripting
languages, embedded programming, database server administration,
multimedia programming, and have decided to use C++ at home as
a way to avoid having to deal with less powerful tools.


Well thats a good start, but "Power is nothing without control", so if you
want the power of C++ you will have to learn to control it, or it will blow
into your face.

A few references to books that are more or less considered canon:

Stroustrups' - The C++ Programming Language, Special Edition.
Nicolai M. Josuttis' - The C++ Standard Library
Scott Meyers - Effective C++ Third Edition
Andrei Alexandrescu - Modern C++ Design

There are many more, but they are a good start.
Finally, if you select only materials (books, etc) which discuss the
standard C++ language, then which implementation you use doesn't matter
(as long as it's reasonably standard-compliant).

I know, I need to become better at reading the APIs but even then I
would need some kind of *friendly* overview of the most commonly used
procedures, due to the immensity of the APIs.


I think whats even more important is that get yourself an overview of the
alternatives. What do you want to archive? C++ has no standard API for GUI
Programming, so you have to choose from the rich variaty of third Party
Libraries.

There are a couple of free ones which are also Cross Platform, like
wxWindows, Trolltech's QT (comes with a very friendly Documentation), gtk,
etc. Serch this or comp.lang.c++.moderated's archive for GUI, and there
should be a whole lot of threads discussing this in detail.
(or have a look at
http://www.geocities.com/SiliconVall...4/guitool.html )

HTH

Fabio





Aug 4 '05 #8

P: n/a
I've almost completed developing a USB device and want to use C++ as
the front end application development tool. If these cross platform
implementations are better than 'a certain other implementation' I'd
have to try it in order to get customers on other platforms. Your
website looks very useful. Thanks.

Aug 4 '05 #9

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