By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
446,376 Members | 1,566 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 446,376 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

custom C++ exceptions

P: n/a
Hello everyone,

Recently I was coding a little app at home on my Linux box. I'm
using gcc 3.3.4 (well actually g++) to compile my programs. I was
compiling a module of the app into object code and got a nasty error
that gcc could not find a matching constructor. Here is the offening
code in simplified terms.
---code----

//file: myexception.hh
#include <exception>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class MyException : public exception {
public:
MyException(const string & Message = "") :
exception(Message.c_str()) {}
};

//End of file.

---code---

And simply put this is what I would like to do with it.

---code---

#include <iostream>
#include <myexception.hh>

//And whatever other headers I may use.

void blah() { throw MyException("Blah, not done yet!"); }

int main() {

//Some code here...

try {
blah()
}
catch (MyException e) {

cout << e.what() << endl;
}

//and so on...
}

This seems to work with the HP-UX compiler and seems to be valid
code in most of the books I have read, however, upon inspection of the
header file on Linux, it does indeed lack a constructor for
std::exception::exception(const char *)

However, the GNU header seems to have a public function member
called what(). This leads me to believe that somewhere it has a
private data member that holds a message of some sort.

This leads me to my question: If the GNU c++ library lacks a
constructor to set a data member to hold some sort of message, then how
does one set a message at all.

Thank you all in advance,
Justin

Jul 23 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
4 Replies


P: n/a
slack_justyb wrote:
Hello everyone,

Recently I was coding a little app at home on my Linux box. I'm
using gcc 3.3.4 (well actually g++) to compile my programs. I was
compiling a module of the app into object code and got a nasty error
that gcc could not find a matching constructor. Here is the offening
code in simplified terms.
---code----

//file: myexception.hh
#include <exception>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class MyException : public exception {
public:
MyException(const string & Message = "") :
exception(Message.c_str()) {}
};

//End of file.

---code---

And simply put this is what I would like to do with it.

---code---

#include <iostream>
#include <myexception.hh>

//And whatever other headers I may use.

void blah() { throw MyException("Blah, not done yet!"); }

int main() {

//Some code here...

try {
blah()
}
catch (MyException e) {

cout << e.what() << endl;
}

//and so on...
}

This seems to work with the HP-UX compiler and seems to be valid
code in most of the books I have read, however, upon inspection of the
header file on Linux, it does indeed lack a constructor for
std::exception::exception(const char *)

However, the GNU header seems to have a public function member
called what(). This leads me to believe that somewhere it has a
private data member that holds a message of some sort.

This leads me to my question: If the GNU c++ library lacks a
constructor to set a data member to hold some sort of message, then how
does one set a message at all.

Thank you all in advance,
Justin


Here's a snip from the docs for 'std::exception'

<snip>

exception

class exception {
public:
exception() throw();
exception(const exception& rhs) throw();
exception& operator=(const exception& rhs) throw();
virtual ~exception() throw();
virtual const char *what() const throw();
};

The class serves as the base class for all exceptions thrown by certain
expressions and by the Standard C++ library. The C string value returned
by what() is left unspecified by the default constructor, but may be
defined by the constructors for certain derived classes. None of the
member functions throw any exceptions.

</snip>

As you can see, there is not a constructor for 'exception' that
takes a 'const char *' arg.

what() is virtual, derived class can define a what() that returns
meaningful data -and- implement a constructor that takes a
'const char *' arg.

Something like this might be appropriate:

class MyException : public exception
{
private:
std::string msg;

public:
MyException() throw() {}
~MyException() throw() {}
MyException(const MyException& rhs) throw() :
msg(rhs.msg) {}
MyException(const char * Message) : msg(Message) {}
MyException(const string & Message) : msg(Message) {}
MyException& operator=(const MyException& rhs) throw()
{ msg = rhs.msg; }
const char * what() const throw()
{ return msg.c_str(); }
};

Larry
Jul 23 '05 #2

P: n/a
Thank you.

I reread the header and noticed the virtual nature of the header.
I'll move on to futher implement my exception class in order to make it
more usable.

Cheers,
Justin

Jul 23 '05 #3

P: n/a
Ian
slack_justyb wrote:


catch (MyException e) {

cout << e.what() << endl;
}

Not answering your question, but never catch by value. You will both
slice any derived exception and copy it.

Catch by const reference.

Ian
Jul 23 '05 #4

P: n/a
Thank you for your information.
I was just trying to write some quick code to show my point in my
example above, but to be more correct I will show the modified code
here for any who may read this thread.

---code---

catch (const MyException &e) {

cout << e.what() << endl;
}

---code---

It was a slight mistake that I simply overlooked in writing my example.
I hope that this clears things up.

Jul 23 '05 #5

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.